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PDR Presentation 1. Eric P o Team Leader o Payload Manager o Documentation Manager Michael B o Building Team Manager o Safety Manager Sean K o Outreach.

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Presentation on theme: "PDR Presentation 1. Eric P o Team Leader o Payload Manager o Documentation Manager Michael B o Building Team Manager o Safety Manager Sean K o Outreach."— Presentation transcript:

1 PDR Presentation 1

2 Eric P o Team Leader o Payload Manager o Documentation Manager Michael B o Building Team Manager o Safety Manager Sean K o Outreach o Materials Manager Jacob E o Launch Manager o Budget Manager Mike P o Technology Manager o Equipment and Facility Manager Michael G o Recovery Manager o Communications Manager Brian G o Technical Manager o MSDS Manager The Lake Zurich Rocketry Team and Responsibilities 2

3 LengthDiameterFinSpanMass (with motor) in6.16 in15.16 in Oz MotorCGCPStability Margin K1050W in in2.05 ComponentJustificationMaterials Nose Cone Part of payload - needs to be durable Fiberglass ogive with short shoulder for more room in payload tube. Payload Need to be lightweight and relatively durable coupler and containmentt tube are made from kraft phonelic Payload Tube Needs to be lightweight and durable - to resist zippers. 6" Carbon Fiber - fiberglass too heavy. Avionics Bay Can't block the signal from the GPS 14" kraft phonelic coupler Avionics Bay Collar Holds the arming switches - can be easily armed from outside of LV. 2" collar is adequate for arming switches and for vent hole for altimeter. Drogue Chute Design to eject with payload and allow LV to descend with wind. 18" Nylon chute that is attached with quick links to eyebolts in bulkplate on Avionics Bay. Vehicle dimensions, materials, and justifications 3

4 ComponentJustificationMaterials Main Chute Designed to slow the LV down to safe landing velocity. 78" Nylon chute that deploys at 1,000' to reduce impact of winds. Booster Tube Needs to be lightweight and durable to resist zippers. 6" Carbon Fiber - fiberglass was too heavy for the motor requirement. Motor Mount Standard kraft phonelic motor mount system for 54 mm motor. Using a K1050W motor from Aerotech which is a long motor requiring extra length in the booster tube. Bulkplates and Centering Rings Strong, lightweight, and easy to glue All bulkplates are made of 1/4" birch plywood Fins Easily attached to motor tube, and sized to provide stable flight. Fiberglass fins provide durable system, and easily shaped for accuracy in predicting flight stability. Carbon Fiber airframe was selected due to weight concerns of the total rocket, and the required durability to reduce damage and ‘zippers’. Special epoxy will be used wherever a bond to the carbon fiber airframe is required. Vehicle dimensions, materials, and justifications – cont. 4

5 Static Stability Margin Component WeightsOz. Stability Data Launch Vehicle134.14Stability Margin2.05 Payload46.00Center of Pressure71.09 Avionics Bay81.02Center of Gravity58.57 Motor System83.50 The CG and CP are 12.1 " from each other, with the CG being 58.57" from the nose tip. Recovery Systems43.45 Total Static Stability Margin 5 The team has used RockSim to arrive at a safe Stability Margin, and will also use physical Measurements to verify these results.

6 Vehicle Safety Verification and Testing 6 Systems and Subsystems to be tested and verified: Airframe Structural Strength – Flight testing and analysis Fins – Flight testing and analysis Rocket Stability – RockSim and physical measurements Motor Selection – RockSim, and manufacturer specs. Ejection System – low pressure ground testing and flight testing Recovery System – (chutes and shock cords) stress testing and flight testing Payload – analysis, weather balloon testing, and flight testing Test Dates: Ejection and Recovery Systems: 1/17/2012, 2/25/2012, 3/3/2012, 3/17/2012 Test Flights – Sub-scale: 1/17/2012 Test Flights – Full-scale: 3/17/2012, 4/07/2012 Payload testing: in December and January – as weather permits Team Safety Managers will be briefing the team every other week on safety issues and training. They will also be responsible for executing the team safety plan, and maintaining a safe environment.

7 7 Motor Selection and Justification Motor Selected: Aerotech K1050W Total Impulse = Ns Size= 54mm diameter x 62.7 cm length Total Weight = 2203 g Prop Weight = 1265 g Maximum Thrust = 2172 N Average Thrust = N Burn Time = 2.1 sec

8 8 Thrust to Weight Ratio and Rail Exit Velocity Thrust to Weight Ratio Rocket weight = kg Thrust = Ns Ratio = to 1 Rail Exit Velocity Launch Rail Length = 120” Exit Velocity = ft/s

9 9 Launch Vehicle Verification and Test Plan Launch Vehicle RequirementVerification and Test Plan 5,280 feet AGLRockSim analysis and LV test 1 Maximum total impulse of 2,560 Ns (K class) Aerotech testing results for K1050W motor Remain subsonicRockSim and LV test 1 All sections to have GPS tracking deviceTest Must be have a stabilty margin of between 2.0 and 2.50 (RockSim) RockSim analysis and inspection Must have at least 1 sub-scale test flightScheduled for Must have at least 1 test flight of full-scale LV Scheduled for Ready to launch within 2 hours of waiverTesting Ready mode for one hourTesting DERS - Drogue and Main chutesInspection and Testing PDR Requirements and Launch Vehicle Verification and Testing to Meet these Criteria Team Safety Managers will be briefing the team every other week on safety issues and training. They will also be responsible for executing the team safety plan, and maintaining a safe environment

10 10 Launch Vehicle Verification and Test Plan – cont. Launch Vehicle RequirementVerification and Test Plan Ejection Charges adequate for construction Low Pressure Ground testing, Sub-scale test flight Separate Arming Switches - no higher than 6' above base Inspection and testing Redundant Altimeter SystemsTesting Electronics protected from frequency interference Analysis and testing Removable Shear pinsTesting No more than 75 ft/lbs of Kinetic Energy upon landing for each section RockSim analysis and LV Test All sections within 2,500 feet of launch padRockSim analysis Ready for re-launch in same day - no repairs or modifications Testing PDR Requirements and Launch Vehicle Verification and Testing to Meet these Criteria Team Safety Managers will be briefing the team every other week on safety issues and training. They will also be responsible for executing the team safety plan, and maintaining a safe environment

11 11 Major Components and Subsystems Launch System – the system to ignite the motor, the launch buttons, and the launch rail must all operate according to safe launch procedures. Launch checklist – all team members must complete their assigned tasks as outlined in the Launch Checklist. Motor System – the motor must operate as designed, and the structural system holding ht motor in the rocket must be secure and durable. Ejection System – the altimeters and ejection charges must fire as planned in order to ensure a safe deployment of the recovery system. This is a critical subsystem in our project, and impacts not only the mission outcome, but also the safety of the team and bystanders. Recovery System – the parachutes and shock cords must deploy correctly, and work to slow the LV to a safe velocity during descent. Recovery Checklist – each team member must perform their assigned checklist duties to ensure safe and reliable recovery of the rocket, components, and data. Launch Vehicle Systems

12 12 Major Components and Subsystems – cont. Recovery System Electronics Sled housed in the Avionics Bay Forward and Aft Bulkplates Avionics Bay Assembly

13 13 Major Components and Subsystems – cont. Recovery System Ejection Charges Payload – Drogue Chute o Free volume = ci o Charge size = 3 grams Booster – Main Chute o Free volume = ci o Charge size = 3 grams Parachutes Drogue Chute o Weight =.6 oz. o Diameter = 18” o Descent Velocity = ft/sec Main Chute o Weight = 11 oz. o Diameter = 78” o Descent Velocity = ft/sec Recovery Note – The Launch Vehicle will descend without the payload and nose cone. This required a separate RockSim simulation to calculate for this different weight.

14 14 Payload Design Payload System

15 15 R/C Signal Components ComponentFunction HiTec Optic 2.4 Transmits the commands for movinig the fins and power to the fan HiTec-Minima 6T Receives the fan and fin movement information from the tramsmitter HiTec-HS-45HB Moves the directional fins per the signal received Payload Design – cont. Telemetry Components ComponentFunction HTSS-Blue transmits the telemetry data to the HTS-Navi- USB HTS-GPS Calculates GPS and altitude information every second HTS-Navi-USB Enters the telemetry data into grounnd based laptop Additional Payload Components ComponentFunction WiVid L-5801-B Transmits positioning video to Payload Pilot Garmin Astro 220 Assists in recovery of Payload - back up for GPS data E-Flite 300 EFLM1150 Adjustable speed fan for forward movement E-Flite 300 EFLM1150 powers all of the R/C controls on the Payload Horizon R/C landing gear Moves the camera to the desired view point for pilot control LOC Precision / Custom-made Custom vents to propel the Payload forward Custom Made Adjusts the air flow to turn the Payload on descent

16 16 Payload Verification and Testing Payload Verification System and SubsystemsPerformance CharacteristicsVerification Payload Will be controlled to within 50 feet of a designated landing site Will send data back to the ground station If the payload lands within 50 feet of a designated location If the payload sends wireless information to the ground station during flight Brushless Motor with a Propeller and Fins Will propel the payload forward. Will alter the outgoing airflow from the payload to generate thrust in a specific direction If we are able to alter the payloads trajectory while in flight The HiTEC GPS Sensor and Sensor Station Will send information to the ground station such as speed, GPS location, flight path, and altitude If we receive information from the payload during the payload’s flight The WiVid Lightweight Video Camera Will send video telemetry to the ground station to give us a perception of what direction the payload is traveling in If we receive video telemetry from the payload during the payload’s flight RequirementDesign The payload's trajectory will be controlled The payload contains a remote controlled fan and several fins to allow changes in the payload's descent. The payload will send wireless telemetry to the ground station while in flight The payload will utilize a GPS sensor to transmit position from the payload to a monitor on the ground The payload will send video telemetry to the ground station while in flight The payload will utilize a video camera to transmit video telemetry to a monitor in the ground station The payload will land at a designated point on the ground Utilizing systems, the payload will land within 50 feet of a designated location

17 17 Payload Verification and Testing – cont. Payload Testing TestProcedures Drop TestThe payload is dropped from a helium balloon at 250 feet to test for accuracy of steering and structural integrity Battery Connection TestThe batteries are connected to the various subsystems to test for functionality GPS Location Test (GPS Unit)GPS is tested in various locations for verification of accuracy Altitude Test (GPS Unit)GPS unit is taken to various heights to test for accuracy Speed Test (GPS Unit)GPS unit is moved at various speeds for verification of accuracy Flight Path Test (GPS Unit)GPS unit’s flight path is tested during the drop test to verify accuracy GPS Location Test (Garmin Astro) GPS is tested in various locations for verification of accuracy Altitude Test (Altimeter)Altimeter is taken to various heights to test for accuracy R/C Transmitter and Receiver Operating Distance Test R/C Transmitter and Receiver are taken to their furthest operating distance to verify that the will operate at over 1 mile Thrust TestThe payload is placed on a scale and has its thrust steadily increased to verify that it can propel the payload in flight Wiring TestThe subsystems are connected to corresponding wire connections to test if each responds accordingly Stress TestThe payload is run for an hour to verify that it can withstand the stresses of flight Camera TestCamera images are compared to known ground features to ensure that the camera is functioning Final TestThe completed payload is tested for functionality

18 18 Thank you! Can we answer any of your questions?


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