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1 1 US CBP-CBSA Beyond the Border Action Plan Stakeholder Town Hall

2 Integrated cargo security strategy: Advance data requirements Commercial Townhall Niagara, NY February 28, 2012 US Speaker: Mr. Dan Baldwin, CBP CDN Speaker: Ms. Kristine Stolarik, CBSA

3 Defining Success Develop a common set of required data elements for all modes of transport for advance security screening of cargo including:  targeted populations for collections  timing for collections  data elements Success achieved when  Data elements have been harmonized to the fullest extent possible  Client Satisfaction with alternate approaches and processes to submit advance data elements Contribution to border management  Accelerated movement of cargo that proceeds to cross the border  Enhanced security of the supply chain 3

4 Economic Benefits Harmonization of pre-arrival data requirements for all stakeholders and alternate processes and approaches for Trusted Trader participants.  Data harmonization will mean streamlining the requirements and reducing complexity for trade to provide the same information to both Agencies; thereby reducing the compliance burden on industry  Consistency in data requirements will decrease the likelihood of errors, resulting in higher compliance rates, and therefore, fewer data corrections and fewer delays at the border.  Harmonizing data elements will allow for increased accuracy in risk assessments based on common data elements, thus expediting processing of low risk goods.  Reduced costs to industry conducting business across the border by implementing, where practicable, common practices and streamlined procedures for customs processing of Trusted Trader participants. 4

5 Project Critical Path Project Timeline 5

6 Linkages with Other Initiatives Linkages with other initiatives:  This initiative is linked to the two other components of the ICSS:  Mutual recognition of Air Cargo Security Programs (Transport Canada and Transportation Security Administration)  Integrated Inbound Strategy.  Harmonized and enhanced benefits for trusted trader programs  Single Window Potential Pressures  Both agencies are in various stages of introduction of advance trade data requirements and harmonization could impact current implementation schedules already announced to industry 6

7 External and Internal (OGD) Stakeholders External  Rail, Air, Highway, and Marine trade communities  Freight Forwarders  CBP Electronic Systems Advisory Committee  Commercial Operations Advisory Committee Internal  Transport Canada  United Stated Transportation Security Administration  Canadian Food Inspection Agency  United States Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service  United States Coast Guard  United States Food and Drug Administration Stakeholder Questions and Consultation  Both CBP and the CBSA have been consulting with industry as they have implemented their requirements for their respective programs that call for the provision of pre-arrival data.  This practice of consultation will continue for this initiative 7

8 Project Governance  The CBSA Beyond the Border Senior Level Committee and the PV DG Steering Committee have been specifically established to oversee the management and progress of the initiative  Progress on this initiative will be reported by CBP through DHS to the White House National Security Staff according to an agreed upon matrix  CBP will track the day to day progress of the initiative on behalf of the U.S. Government through its Project Management Plan  CBSA-CBP Advance Data Elements Working Group will analyze the current data sets and make recommendations with respect to harmonization  The governance that oversees Perimeter Vision is in line with the Project Governance Framework and the decision making process will be administered through various governance practices to ensure appropriate oversight 8

9 Comment Period 9

10 10 Integrated Cargo Security Strategy Commercial Town Hall Niagara Falls, NY February 28, 2012 US Speaker: Mr. Dan Baldwin, CBP CDN Speaker: Ms. Kristine Stolarik, CBSA

11 Defining Success We will develop a joint Integrated Cargo Security Strategy (ICSS) to address risks associated with shipments arriving from offshore based on informed risk management.  ICSS aims to identify and resolve security and contraband concerns as early as possible in the supply chain or at the perimeter. The desired end state is a harmonized perimeter targeting, risk assessment and risk mitigation regime that offers enhanced supply chain security and the facilitative benefit of expediting the security clearance of cargo intending to cross the Canada - United States (U.S.) land border. The success of ICSS will advance border management by:  Optimizing the efficiency of offshore cargo clearing, thereby accelerating the legitimate flow of goods between the Canada and the U.S.;  Improving our capacity for interdicting and seizing inadmissible goods;  Providing joint responses to threats; thus increasing perimeter security. 11

12 Economic Benefits  Enhanced and convergent Canadian and U.S. cargo security programs and cooperation with international partners to enhance global supply chain security will:  Optimize efficiency of offshore cargo clearing by providing joint responses to threats; thus enhancing supply chain security and accelerating the legitimate flow of cargo between Canada and the U.S.  Provide greater consistency and predictability in the processes; each country assesses risk at the perimeter and conducts examination on behalf of the other country that will enable expedited clearance of cargo that proceeds to cross the Canada / U.S. land border.  Improve economic competitiveness due to reduced examinations and/or re- inspections and associated costs, as well as reduced waiting times at the border.  Investments in cargo examination facilities will increase efficiency and effectiveness; thus improving economic competitiveness, reduce costs, and facilitate improved just-in-time shipments for both exporters and domestic manufacturers. 12

13 Project Critical Path Project Timeline 13

14 Linkages with Other Initiatives Linkages  This initiative is linked to the two other components of the ICSS:  Mutual Recognition of Air Cargo (Transport Canada and Transportation Security Administration);  Advance Data Requirements.  The prospective wood packaging material component is dependant upon the completion of a Wood Packaging Material Feasibility Study – Implement Additional Pre-Inspection and Preclearance Initiatives (Lead: Public Safety and Department of Homeland Security). Potential Pressures  Should pilots be fully implemented, the demand on IT resources for PV builds may become too great. 14

15 External and Internal (OGD) Stakeholders External  Rail, Air, Highway, and Marine trade communities  Freight Forwarders  CBP Electronic Systems Advisory Committee  Commercial Operations Advisory Committee Internal  Transport Canada  United Stated Transportation Security Administration  Canadian Food Inspection Agency  United States Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service  United States Coast Guard  United States Food and Drug Administration Stakeholder Questions and Consultation  CBP and the CBSA will form working groups for each pilot  Pilots are expected to begin in September  Industry will be asked to develop the pilots and track the performance measures to ensure that they will feel the impact during the one year pilot period. 15

16 Project Governance  The CBSA Beyond the Border Senior Level Committee and the Beyond the Border DG Steering Committee have been specifically established to oversee the management and progress of the initiative  Progress on this initiative will be reported by CBP through DHS to the White House National Security Staff according to an agreed upon matrix  CBP will track the day to day progress of the initiative on behalf of the U.S. Government through its Project Management Plan  CBSA-CBP will work together industry stakeholders to design implement and evaluate the pilots  The governance that oversees Beyond the Border is in line with the Project Governance Framework and the decision making process will be administered through various governance practices to ensure appropriate oversight 16

17 Comment Period 17

18 18 Single Window Initiative Bi-National Commercial Town Hall Niagara Falls, NY February 28, 2012 US Speaker: Ms. Brenda Smith, US CBP CDN Speaker: Ms. Bruna Rados, CBSA

19 Defining Success A more integrated border process whereby:  Traders are provided with a single window in each country through which they can electronically submit all information to comply with Customs and other government regulations for border related decisions.  Departments and agencies have the required electronic data to support admissibility recommendations by their respective programs.  Data requirements are converted to electronic form using Customs import data collection mechanisms, minimizing the requirement for paper forms in the import process.  The United States (U.S.) and Canada achieve an increased measure of data harmonization for imports into both countries.  Improved trade facilitation and increased efficiency are achieved through the use of electronic data interchange.  There is an increase in the number of departments and agencies conducting business electronically at the border. 19

20 Economic Benefits  Simplifying, eliminating and streamlining current paper processes and improving border processing time can lead to reduced import costs for trade.  Ensuring consistent application of all government import regulations and reporting requirements.  Aligning with international standards for product/commodity identification and processing.  Reducing border compliance costs for trade while improving border efficiency and contribute to the health, safety and security of the public. 20

21 Project Critical Path High-Level Timelines  Technology - Provide the technology to convert data requirements of all partnering departments and agencies to electronic form by 2013 and provide the mechanism for trade to submit partnering government agency and department data requirements electronically to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Customs and Border Protection (CBP).  Regulatory – Departments and agencies will review their existing regulatory requirements and identify for conversion only that information that is essential for regulatory purposes and border related decisions.  Trade Outreach – The CBSA, CBP, Partnering Departments and Agencies will engage in consultations with stakeholders to determine the most efficient and effective manner for collecting the required import information.  Agency Participation – Maximize Department and Agency participation, with concentration on the priority partners. 21

22 Project Critical Path (continued) Key Deliverables  Engage in consultations with stakeholder to determine the most efficient and effective manner for collecting import information (begin June 2012).  Data collection  Commodity / product identification  Improved business processes  U.S. and Canada align data requirements, where possible (June 2012).  Development of technological enhancements to allow trade to submit electronic data to comply with customs and other government regulations for each country respectively (December 2013).  Development of technological enhancements to transfer data from Customs administrations to Participating Departments and Agencies (PGAs) (December 2013). 22

23 Challenges Dependencies on technological infrastructure  CBP and CBSA commercial environments are evolving  Multiplicity of PGAs introduces complex technological challenges Extensive intergovernmental co-dependencies  Demands a high level of participation and commitment from Departments and Agencies in both countries Legislative, Regulatory and Policy changes  Transition to electronic environment may require modernization of PGA legislative frameworks 23

24 Linkages with Other Initiatives  Integrated Cargo Security Strategy: Advanced Data Requirement – Data Harmonization.  Harmonizing Low Value Shipment processes – impact on data availability for PGAs/Other Government Departments.  Advance Trade Data (eManifest) and Integrated Import Declaration - (The CBSA). 24

25 Stakeholders  Canada and the U.S. will establish working groups with representatives from the Trade community to discuss the development of SWI deliverables such as:  Data requirements  Improved Business Processes  Outreach Improvements  Stakeholders will need to begin looking at changes to the way business is conducted at the border. 25

26 Next Steps  Canada and the U.S. have established a robust governance structure to ensure that both countries continue to collaborate on the progress of their respective SWI programs.  CBP and the CBSA plan to begin trade consultations in the coming months.  CBP and the CBSA to consult with Government departments and trade community to develop strategies for improved information and integration at the border.  The CBSA will communicate through established forums (Other Government Department Border Commercial Consultative Committee Subcommittee) on planned trade consultations. 26

27 Comment Period 27

28 Implement Pre-inspection and Pre-clearance Initiatives Commercial Townhall Niagara, NY February 28, 2012 US Speaker: Mr. Leroy Frazier, CBP CDN Speaker: Mr. Paul Haddow, PCO

29 The Overall Objective of the Border Action Plan  “Addressing threats at the earliest possible point is essential to strengthen the shared security of our countries and enable us to improve the free flow of legitimate goods and people across the Canada-U.S. border.”  “As our two countries work to strengthen the security of our shared perimeter, we will take steps simultaneously to create more openness at the land border for legitimate trade and travel.” 29

30 The Role of Pre-clearance and Pre-inspection  Permits more efficient use of limited physical border infrastructure  Manages risks earlier in the supply chain/travel continuum  Not a “one size fits all” approach but a package of initiatives, each of which is designed to effectively address a specific, practical problem  Some situations would require full pre-clearance as solution; others could be effectively addressed through pre-inspection  Some situations would call for scope to include travellers and cargo while others could be limited to one or the other.  Long history of mutual benefits from pre-clearance in the air passenger mode 30

31 The Pre-clearance Agenda (1)  Canada and the United States (U.S.) will negotiate, by December, 2012, a pre-clearance agreement for the land, marine and rail modes to provide the legal framework and reciprocal authorities necessary for the CBSA and CBP to effectively carry out their missions in the other country.  Concurrently, the authorities of inspecting officers under the Canada- U.S. Air Transport Pre-clearance Agreement will be reviewed and amended to be comparable to those exercised at airports by officers of the host country.  Both governments will identify and develop solutions to operational impediments to the effectiveness of CBP’s pre-clearance operations at Canadian airports by June, Implementation of the agreed solutions will begin in December,

32 The Pre-clearance Agenda (2)  Canada and the U.S. will launch, by September, 2012, a land cargo pre-inspection pilot in at least one location in Canada.  CFIA and FSIS will initiate by June of 2012 a one-year pilot to provide for advance review and clearance of official certification and alternative approaches to import inspection activities for fresh meat.  APHIS/CBP and CFIA/CBSA will conduct a jointly funded study, to be completed by December,2012, to examine the feasibility of moving wood packing material inspections of cargo arriving from offshore away from the U.S.-Canada border to the perimeter (“Cleared once, accepted twice.”) 32

33 Measuring Progress  Public Safety Canada and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security will lead the negotiations for rail, marine and highway modes as well as the updates of authorities under the existing air pre-clearance agreement.  They will similarly lead the negotiations for the cargo pre-inspection pilot  CFIA and USDA\FSIS will conduct the negotiations for the meat pilot  APHIS/CBP and CBSA/CFIA will make publicly available the findings from the respective pilots and report on reductions in wait times for cargo and travelers and increases in throughput for commercial traffic. 33

34 Comment Period 34

35 35 Harmonized and Enhanced Benefits for Trusted Trader Programs Commercial Townhall Niagara, NY February 28, 2012 US Speaker: Mr. Dan Baldwin, CBP CDN Speaker: Ms. Kristine Stolarik, CBSA

36 Defining Success Initiative  Canada and the United States (U.S.) will adopt a common framework to align their Trusted Trader programs requirements, enhance member benefits and provide applicants with the opportunity to submit one application to multiple programs.  Tier one  Harmonize the Partners in Protection (PIP) and Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT)  Align and offer new benefits on both sides of the border  Canada will expand Free And Secure Trade (FAST) benefits to PIP participants at agreed upon locations and assess lane capacity to ensure current users are not negatively impacted  Canada will develop an interoperable communication portal (similar to U.S. portal 36

37 Defining Success (cont’d)  Tier Two - Align self assessment programs and offer new benefits such as expedited border and accounting processes and trade compliance privileges.  Conduct a detailed comparison and review of Customs Self Assessment (CSA) and Importer Self-Assessment (ISA) programs  Canada will implement the Partners in Compliance (PIC) program and incorporate it as an option under the CSA program  U.S. will identify and provide expedited border processes and streamlined accounting benefits  The CBSA and CBP will conduct joint consultations with Tier II stakeholders to identify and assess additional ways to expedite border processes  CSA and ISA programs will be expanded to include non-resident importers between Canada and the U.S.  Extend access to Trusted Trader programs to include shipments that are subject to Other Government Department/Agency requirements.  Canada will conduct a one-year pilot for the agri-food sector  Explore product-specific pilots aimed at lowering inspection rates for certain industry sectors  Canada (CFIA) will lead a pilot for the agri-food sector and the U.S. will lead a pilot for the pharmaceutical sector. 37

38 Defining Success (cont’d)  Administration of U.S. and Canada’s Trusted Trader programs are streamlined and duplication is reduced  Lowered examination rates for Trusted Traders  Program benefits are strengthened, aligned and expanded, to the greatest extend possible  Membership application and renewal processes are streamlined  Program membership continues to increase and participants eligibility is expanded  Regulatory / Non regulatory requirements are reduced where feasible  Expedited border processes for Trusted Traders  Balanced approach to facilitation while ensuring that security issues are mitigated  Client satisfaction is high 38

39 Defining Success (cont’d) Contribution to Border Management  Canada and the U.S. will strengthen their risk management regime to better focus resources on high and unknown risk  Facilitation and acceleration of the movement of goods for Trusted Traders within the Canada-U.S. perimeter while strengthening supply chain security and economic competitiveness  By expanding participation in Free and Secure Trade (FAST), pre-approved, low risk carriers, importers and drivers will benefit from enhanced processes allowing for less documentation, swifter border clearance and lower examinations rates  Reduced administrative and regulatory costs as well as simplified accounting and payment processes for Canadian and U.S. businesses will reduce costs for both industry and Customs Administrations  Participating members with low risk shipments subject to Other Government Department/Agency (OGD/OGA) requirements are provided with alternate methods of submitting transactional data; permitting access to expedited clearance and lowered inspection rates 39

40 Economic Benefits Member Benefits  Increased time savings for industry by expanding eligibility of FAST where feasible  Expedited, streamlined clearance  Reduced border congestion and wait times  Reduced redundancy and cost by harmonizing CBSA and CBP trusted trader programs  Submitting one application to multiple programs and receive the benefits of both countries  Electronic process to provide information and updates  Elimination of multiple country site validations  Increased segment of trade eligible to join CSA program (e.g. Agri-food sector) and receive cost saving benefits  Reduced regulatory and non-regulatory requirements where feasible  Reduced delays and offload costs due to lowered examination rates for Trusted Traders 40

41 Project Critical Path High-level Timelines and Key Deliverables Tier One  Harmonization of Partners in Protection (PIP) and Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) (Phased approach)  PIP members receive FAST benefits (pilot) at agreed upon locations (July 2012)  Canada will initiate a pilot in Sarnia to extend FAST benefits to PIP members  Develop interoperable communication portal and related system functionalities (December 2013) 41

42 Project Critical Path (cont’d) High-level Timelines and Key Deliverables Tier Two  Conduct a detailed comparison and review of CSA and ISA programs (June 2012)  Canada will initiate one-year, product specific (agri-food sector) pilot to enable trusted trader shipments with OGD requirements an expedited clearance process. (July 2012)  U.S. will initiate one-year product specific (pharmaceutical sector) pilot to enable trusted trader shipments with OGD requirements an expedited clearance process (July 2012)  Implement the Partners in Compliance (PIC) program and incorporate it as an option under the CSA program (September 2012)  Through stakeholder consultation, identify and assess additional ways to expedite border process through non-transactional data submission. A report with recommended pilots/initiatives will be developed. (September 2012) 42

43 Linkages with Other Initiatives Linkages and Potential Pressures with Other Initiatives  Integrated Cargo Security Strategy – Advance Data Requirements  Enhance Facilities to Support Increased Participation in Trusted Traders and Traveller Programs  Single Window Initiative 43

44 External and Internal (OGD) Stakeholders External  Other Government Departments/Agencies within Canada and the U.S. (CFIA / FDA)  Canada’s Border Commercial Consultative Committee (BCCC) and the US Advisory Committee on Commercial Operations of Customs and Border Protection (COAC)  Trusted Trader participants Internal  Program areas within the CBSA and CBP  Regional operations  Information Technology areas with the CBSA and CBP  Legal Services 44

45 Next Steps Project Governance:  CBSA-CBP will collaborate amongst themselves as well as with industry partners and stakeholders to solicit input on a variety of initiatives  The governance that oversees Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives are in line with the Project Governance Framework and the decision making process will be administered through various governance practices to ensure proper oversight Stakeholders Questions and Consultations:  BCCC Trusted Trader working group to discuss various initiatives - March 2012  Industry will assist with the development of performance measures to ensure we can monitor impact of pilots and initiatives 45

46 Beyond the Border Action Plan Border Infrastructure Plan Commercial Townhall Niagara, NY February 28, 2012 US Speaker: Mr. Fred Eberhart, DOT Mr. Dennis Counihan, CBP CDN Speaker: Mr. Hal Parker, CBSA Mr. Ted MacKay, TC

47 Defining Success  Success is defined by bi-national transportation and customs infrastructure improvements that enhance cross-border trade, travel, and border security.  These improvements will help to ensure that our border infrastructure has the capacity to properly support and complement the efficiencies gained through other initiatives that fall under the broader vision for perimeter security and economic competitiveness.  To arrive at these infrastructure improvements, the U.S. and Canada will jointly develop and sustain an annual coordinated infrastructure investment plan. 47

48 Defining Success  Initial Canadian priority crossings:  Emerson, Manitoba  Lacolle, Quebec  Lansdowne, Ontario  North Portal, Saskatchewan  Peace Bridge, Ontario  Infrastructure investments at these locations are subject to the availability of funds  Initial U.S. priority crossings:  Alexandria Bay, New York  Blue Water Bridge, Michigan  Lewiston Bridge, New York  Peace Bridge, New York The U.S. and Canada will coordinate plans for investment in physical infrastructure upgrades at key crossings including the following (in alphabetical order): 48

49 Economic Benefits  This initiative, along with several other initiatives under the Beyond the Border Action Plan, is designed to benefit the integrated economies of Canada and the U.S., which depend on the fluid movement of commercial and non-commercial traffic across our borders.  Modernization of major border crossings will provide the following long-term economic benefits:  reduced wait times;  increased reliability of just-in-time shipments; and,  decreased fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, due to less engine idling at the border. 49

50 Project Critical Path  The first annual Border Infrastructure Investment Plan is currently being prepared by Transport Canada, U.S. Department of Transportation, the Canada Border Services Agency, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Completion of this plan is scheduled for June 30,  The U.S. and Canada would then seek the necessary resources needed to implement specific projects identified in the plan.  Performance measures will include: increased capacity at border crossings, reduced wait times, and decreased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, due to less engine idling at the border. 50

51 Linkages with Other Initiatives  This initiative, which specifically targets border infrastructure, is one of several complementary initiatives designed to facilitate cross- border trade, travel, and security. Efficiencies gained through this initiative will support and work in tandem with the following:  Small and Remote Ports of Entry;  Border Wait Time Technology;  Pre-inspection and Pre-clearance;  Enhanced Trusted Trader and Trusted Traveller; and  Harmonized Benefits to NEXUS Members. 51

52 Stakeholders  Stakeholder consultations will be undertaken to inform the first Border Infrastructure Investment Plan.  Consultations with states and provinces will take place at the Transportation Border Working Group (TBWG) Spring Plenary, in Seattle, Washington, in April  Once the upgraded border crossings are fully operational, stakeholders should benefit from increased physical capacity for both commercial and passenger traffic at the border, and decreased border wait times. 52

53 Next Steps  Improving our cross-border infrastructure is a long-term process. As other projects are identified, they will be addressed in annual updates.  A key success factor will be securing the necessary Canadian and U.S. government funding for identified, and future, projects. 53

54 Comment Period 54

55 Border Wait Time Technology Commercial Townhall Niagara, NY February 28, 2012 US Speaker: Ms. Colleen Manahar, CBP CDN Speaker: Mr. Jonathan Sabean, TC

56 Defining Success Initiative Description  To implement a Border Wait Time measurement solution at 20 high priority Canada/U.S. land border crossings.  Installation to be phased in over three years (2012 to 2014). Anticipated Initiative Results  Automation of wait time data collection at selected ports  Data analysis and management strategies that can lead to a reduction in wait times  Reduction of environmental impacts due to reduced wait times  Increased agency reporting and transparency via the Border Infrastructure Investment Plan-Progress Report 56

57 Defining Success Key Outcomes To Border Management  Increased capacity  Increased efficiency and border management  Reduced delays at the border  Automated dissemination of wait time data to drivers to make informed decisions Key Deliverables  Identify reasonable and achievable border wait time service levels at major crossings  Dissemination of real-time border wait times to border and transportation agencies 57

58 Project Critical Path Metrics/Performance Measurement  U.S. and Canada have established a Beyond the Border Working Group (BBWG) composed of representatives from the appropriate departments of our respective governments.  The BBWG will rely upon existing bilateral border-related groups for implementation and reporting.  The BBWG will report on the implementation of this initiative to leaders on an annual basis. Potential Obstacles  Legal and regulatory mechanisms between both countries will be carried out in close consultation with interested stakeholders in both countries.  Progress on many elements of this action plan depend on availability of funding. 58

59 External and Internal (OGD) Stakeholders External and Internal Stakeholders  Federal Highway Administration  Transport Canada  Canada Border Services Agency  U.S. Customs and Border Protection  BC Ministry of Transportation  New York State DOT  New York State Thruway Authority  Niagara International Transportation Technology Coalition  Niagara Bridge Commission  Ontario Ministry of Transportation  Peace Bridge Authority  Washington State DOT  Washington State’s Whatcom Council of Governments  BC/Washington State International Mobility and Trade Corridor Coalition  Canadian/American Border Trade Alliance  New Brunswick, Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan respective transportation authorities 59

60 Linkages with Other Initiatives  Port physical infrastructure upgrades  Build on the twenty land border Bi-national Port Operations Committees established in

61 Project Governance Decision Processes  The Beyond the Border Working Group (BBWG) will be leveraged to manage the selection and deployment of the border wait time measurement solution.  The BWWG will work closely with stakeholders to identify opportunities for cooperation on specific projects and activities that foster the use of technology to measure border wait times at the US/Canada land border crossings. 61

62 Comment Period 62

63 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) U.S. CBP Ready Lanes CBSA Perimeter Vision Commercial Townhall Niagara, NY February 28, 2012 US Speaker: Ms. Colleen Manahar, CBP CDN Speaker: Ms. Rachelle May, CBSA

64 Overview What is RFID and how will it be used at land borders?  Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is technology that uses radio waves to transfer a unique identifier number from an electronic chip located in an RFID enabled document. The use of RFID technology helps expedite cross border traffic at the land border in a secure way. The RFID readers leverage existing infrastructure and are able to read and simultaneously display RFID enabled documents at the Primary Inspection Line (PIL) from a distance which decrease border wait times/processing times. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (U.S. CBP)  Current use of RFID technology and further expansion to dedicated “Ready Lanes”.  CBP has currently deployed RFID Technology to 33 Ports of Entry (POE) on the Northern Border and 24 POE on the Southern Border. Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)  Beyond the Border Action Plan  The CBSA will be deploying RFID technology under the Border Action Plan to 11 land POEs in a minimum of two lanes. 64

65 U.S. CBP Defining Success Description  The U.S. has already extensively invested in RFID technology at the land borders. U.S. CBP has implemented RFID technology at 33 POEs on the Northern land border and 24 POEs on the Southern border to address the operational pressures and border wait times presented through the implementation of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI). U.S. CBP has reported that the use of RFID technology has resulted in a reduction in processing time. The U.S. has also implemented dedicated Ready Lanes at 4 Northern land borders. These lanes can only be utilized by people who possess RFID enabled documents.  To deploy additional Ready Lanes to northern border locations with sufficient RFID document saturation.  To begin an advertising campaign to boost RFID saturation. Defining Success  An increase in Ready Lanes and RFID document saturation will translate to a decrease border wait times. 65

66 U.S. Project Critical Path High-level Timelines  Ready Lane deployments along the northern border by September  Advertising campaign to co-ordinate with Ready Lane openings.  An increase in Ready Lanes and RFID document saturation will translate to a decrease in border wait times\processing times. Key Deliverables  Selection of Ready Lane locations.  Approval of plan.  Approval of funding to begin advertising campaign. 66

67 U.S. CBP Project Critical Path Metrics/Performance Measurements  Improvement in the percentage of vehicles being processed by Ready Lanes and NEXUS lanes.  Increased RFID document saturation along the Northern border. Potential Obstacles  Funding/ad campaign is not currently funded. While ports can re- designate lanes as Ready Lanes, there is no funding for infrastructure upgrades to support Ready Lanes. 67

68 U.S./CBP External and Internal Stakeholders Key Stakeholders  External Stakeholders – Other Governmental Departments (OGD)  Bridge Authorities  Ambassador Bridge  Windsor Tunnel  Peace Bridge  Rainbow Bridge  Department of State  Enhanced Driver’s License (EDL) states  Washington  New York  Vermont  Michigan 68

69 U.S. CBP Linkages with Other Initiatives Linkages and potential pressures with other initiatives  CBP Active Lane Management; Ready Lane project  CBP Light Emitting Diode (LED) signage project 69

70 U.S. CBP Project Governance Governance Structure  CBP (Land Border Integration, Program Management Office) will make decisions regarding when and where to open Ready Lanes, and what hours the lanes will be open.  CBP, Office of Public Affairs (OPA) will determine content of advertising and method of delivery (what stations to advertise, frequency etc.) Internal Governance  CBP will ensure successful Ready Lane deployments regarding cost, scope, and schedule.  CBP has clearly defined roles and responsibilities for the deployment of Ready Lanes.  CBP has defined criteria for reporting project status and for the escalation of risks and issues.  Project stakeholders will be fully engaged throughout the process. 70

71 CBSA Defining Success Description  To facilitate secure passage and expedite processing through implementing Radio Frequency Identification technology at appropriate crossings.  The RFID technology implemented at land ports of entry will:  leverage existing lane infrastructure  read vicinity RFID chips from a distance  simultaneously display RFID enabled documents at the Primary Inspection Line (PIL)  reduce processing times - eliminating the need for an officer to physically scan every travel document Defining Success  The RFID technology will be deployed to 11 land border ports and will be installed in a minimum of two lanes at 11 land ports 71

72 CBSA Project Critical Path High-level Timelines/Linkages  Deployment of RFID technology at 9 of the 11 select crossings will be aligned with the strengthened entry document requirements:  Ambassador Bridge (Windsor, ON);  Blue Water Bridge (Sarnia, ON);  Cornwall (Cornwall, ON);  Douglas (Surrey, BC);  Emerson (Emerson, MB);  Fort Erie – Peace Bridge (Fort Erie, ON);  Lacolle (St-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Que);  Pacific Highway (Surrey, BC);  Queenston Bridge (Niagara, ON);  Rainbow Bridge (Niagara, ON); and  Windsor – Detroit Tunnel (Windsor, ON)  Installation of RFID technology at the two remaining ports of entry at Cornwall, Ontario and Lacolle, Quebec, will be dependent on construction schedules for these separate Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives. 72

73 CBSA Project Critical Path Key Deliverables  Increase public uptake regarding the use of RFID enabled documents is key to the success of this project. The CBSA will develop an elaborate communications strategy. Efforts will be made to work closely with the U.S. CBP, CIC, Passport Canada and the provinces in this regard.  The CBSA will leverage lessons learned from our U.S. counterparts in regards to the implementation of RFID technology. 73

74 CBSA Project Critical Path (cont’d) Metrics/Performance Measurement  Progress towards establishing RFID lanes at all identified crossings.  Impact on processing times for individuals/vehicles after installation of RFID technology.  The number of travellers using RFID enabled documents such as EDLs, U.S. Passport Cards and NEXUS cards. Potential Obstacles  Success of this initiative for the CBSA is dependant on the number of RFID enabled documents on both sides of the border. 74

75 CBSA External and Internal Stakeholders Key Stakeholders  External Stakeholders – Other Governmental Departments (OGD)  Citizenship and Immigration Canada  United States - Customs Border Protection  Passport Canada  Enhanced Driver License Provinces  Ontario  British Columbia  Manitoba  Quebec 75

76 CBSA Project Governance Governance Structure  The CBSA Beyond the Border Action Plan Steering Committee will make decisions on the overall direction of RFID initiative. 76

77 CBSA Project Governance (cont’d) Internal Governance  Individual working groups will be created to focus on specific deliverables in support of the RFID Initiative:  Equipment Procurement  Marketing Communications  Technical Development, Application Testing  Privacy Impact Assessment, Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs), Statement of Sensitivity (SOS)/Threat Risk Assessment (TRA) 77

78 Comment Period 78

79 Harmonizing Low-Value Shipment Processes Commercial Townhall Niagara, NY February 28, 2012 US Speakers: Ms. Brenda Smith, US CBP CDN Speakers: Mr. Brent Patten, CBSA

80 Defining Success  Promote supply chain connectivity by harmonizing low-value shipment processes to expedite customs administration:  We will increase and harmonize the value thresholds to $2,500 for expedited customs clearance from the current levels of $2,000 for the United States and $1,600 for Canada.  Canada will increase the value threshold to $2,500 for exemption from North American Free Trade Agreement Certificate of Origin requirements, thereby aligning it with the current threshold of the U.S. 80

81 Project Critical Path Timelines for development of regulatory changes Department of Treasury/U.S. CBP  Value threshold for an informal entry of $2,500  October 27, 2011: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) published in the Federal Register with a 60-day public comment period  December 27, 2011: NPRM comment period closes, 18 comment letters received, overwhelmingly favourable to proposed threshold change  Summer 2012 (projected): Publication of a Final Rule establishing threshold for informal entries Canada Border Services Agency Value threshold of $2,500 for LVS  December 7, 2011: Announced and released by the Prime Minister and the President  Canada Border Services Agency officials working to amend the Accounting for Imported Goods and Payment of Duties Regulations to increase value threshold to $2,500  Implementation date of increased threshold – to be determined 81

82 Project Critical Path Timelines for development of regulatory changes (cont’d)  Canada Border Services Agency / Department of Finance  Value threshold of $2,500 for exemption of NAFTA Certificate of Origin requirement  December 7, 2011: Announced and released by the Prime Minister and the President  Department of Finance and the Canada Border Services Agency officials working together to amend the Proof of Origin of Imported Goods Regulations to increase value threshold to $2,500  Implementation date of increased threshold – to be determined 82

83 Comment Period 83

84 Border Fees and Charges Commercial Townhall Niagara, NY February 28, 2012 US Speaker: Mr. Dan Baldwin, CBP CDN Speaker: Mr. Paul Haddow, PCO

85 What We Heard  Given the current and future realities in the international marketplace, smooth and efficient border processing at the land border is critical for the competitiveness of our highly-integrated North American manufacturing sector.  Based on what we heard from stakeholders, a number of initiatives were included in the Action Plan to specifically reduce the compliance burden at the land border.  Stakeholders also stated that border fees create challenges for their domestic and international competitiveness, particularly for companies/industries that produce goods requiring several cross- border transactions. 85

86 The Action Plan Commitments We Will:  Develop for each country an inventory of fees and charges at the border which sets out their purpose and legal basis, how they are collected, how much is collected, their intended use and the rationale for collecting them at the border.  Using an agreed methodology, Commission a disinterested third party to conduct an economic impact assessment of such fees, including their cumulative effect, on the competitive position of three economic sectors in Canada and the United States for which cross-border activity is important.  Public Safety Canada and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security will produce and publish a joint Report on the above, which would be presented to Leaders and made available to the public by September 30,

87 The Objective for This Initiative  A common, analytically rigorous understanding of the current situation is a pre-requisite for a focused and informed discussion on what can and should be done about border fees and charges in the future.  The joint inventory and impact assessment will lay the groundwork for discussions on such issues as:  Impact of border fees and charges on the competitive position of our key industries? Are some fees more important than others?  How border fees and charges different sectors/industries?  Are there other ways to collect fees that are more user-friendly to industries? 87

88 Next Steps  Governments need to agree on a common position on some key issues prior to undertaking Phase I, the development of the inventory, such as:  Should fees and charges collected in all modes be included or should focus be limited to those collected at the land border?  Which fees should be included and which not?  For example, tariffs and taxes should not be included. What about program membership fees? Administrative monetary penalties?  Once Phase I is completed, Governments will need to work with industries being assessed by third party to ensure data analyzed and methodologies used are sound and reflect business realities for the third party assessment. 88

89 Comment Period 89

90 US CBP-CBSA Beyond the Border Action Plan Stakeholder Town Hall your comments on the Beyond the Border Action Plan to Visit URLs: border /feature.asp?pageId=357& featureId=30


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