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Document 61 1 Lansdowne Partnership Plan Transportation and Transit Strategy Presentation to Joint Transportation Committee and Transit Committee October.

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Presentation on theme: "Document 61 1 Lansdowne Partnership Plan Transportation and Transit Strategy Presentation to Joint Transportation Committee and Transit Committee October."— Presentation transcript:

1 Document 61 1 Lansdowne Partnership Plan Transportation and Transit Strategy Presentation to Joint Transportation Committee and Transit Committee October 8, 2009 Document 6

2 Overview OP and TMP Policy Framework and April 22 Council Directions – John Smit Lansdowne Partnership Plan Transportation Strategy – Ron Jack (Delcan) OC Transpo Operations Considerations and experiences – Pat Scrimgeour Traffic Management Considerations and Experiences – Phil Landry Next Steps – John Smit 2

3 Document 6 OP and TMP Policy Framework and April 22 Council Directions - Overview Official Plan policies, TMP directions and April 22, 2009 Motion of Council define the context and establish the framework for the LPP Transportation Strategy The LLP Transportation Strategy in turn will serve as the foundation for: –Undertaking a detailed Transportation Study and –Preparing a Transportation Demand Management Plan 3

4 Document 6 Official Plan Directions One of the key elements of the OP - increase use of sustainable transportation including walking, cycling and transit and reducing dependence on automobile use for all trips Specific Directives related to this proposal –Transportation Demand Management –Transportation System Management –Cycling Plan and Pedestrian Plan –Rapid Transit System Development –Parking 4

5 Document 6 Official Plan Directions (cont’d) Land use is a key element of achieving the Plan’s transportation objectives. Mixed use and more intense development in strategic areas will support: –Maximizing use of existing transportation infrastructure; –Support and enhance use of Alternative Transportation Systems (Pedestrian, Cycling, Transit) to reduce automobile travel –Reduce the need to travel across the city for different trip types. The specifics of how the City’s transportation objectives will be achieved are set out in the TMP. 5

6 Document 6 TMP Directions The Transportation Master Plan sets out specific directives and initiatives for a sustainable transportation system. Key directions include: Creating Supportive Land Uses –More intense mixed use development at key locations (mainstreets) –More compact development to reduce land area used for parking –Pursue opportunities for shared parking and for partnerships with the private sector to provide parking facilities/structures 6

7 Document 6 TMP Directions (cont’d) Managing Transportation Demand –Develop and implement TDM initiatives to increase use of sustainable transportation for all trip types; –Improve travel options for event attendees - walking, cycling, ride sharing, boats, and transit use Managing the Transportation System –Optimize the efficiency and people moving capacity of transportation facilities Improve Alternative Transportation Systems –Rapid Transit, Pedestrian, Cycling 7

8 Document 6 April 22 Council Directions The following directions requires that a strategy be developed for getting people to and from Lansdowne that places emphasis on Transit, Walking and Cycling – consistent with OP and TMP directions. –Revitalize and improve the Stadium and Civic center complex; –Design a substantial portion of the hard surface area of the park as public open space that is green and sustainable for recreational use; –Improve pedestrian and cycle links and access to the canal, recreation paths, garden and to adjacent parks; and, –That public transit options be considered 8

9 Document 6 Key changes to Lansdowne Less parking – reduced from 2200 to approximately 1800 (1100 below grade); Revitalized Stadium and Civic Center will remain with similar capacity as original facilities capable of accommodating the same scale of events as in the past; Introduction of mixed use resulting in day time activity. 9

10 Document 6 Transportation Strategy Mandate Identify preliminary impacts and requirements of the Lansdowne Live Proposal (LLP) in the context of Council direction and City policies Identify leading edge TDM Plan to address transportation requirements Identification of Action Items for further study 10

11 Document 6 Understanding the Existing Site “Transportation” Conditions Parking supply and its use Vehicle access/egress and level of service Service vehicle requirements for various event sizes Pedestrian mobility, circulation patterns and sidewalk/pathway connectivity Regular transit service Special events transit service 11

12 Document 6 Understanding the Site’s Context Bank Street traffic operations Typical “Main Street” transportation characteristics Community on-street parking supply Residential Parking Permits Available on-street parking supply Existing and historic “event” parking impacts 12

13 Document 6 Transportation Strategy Development Understand mandate Know existing conditions (on and off-site) Understand TDM’s relevance Understand Special Event History at Lansdowne – event sizes – transit service – traffic operations Determine LLP’s transportation impacts and requirements 13

14 Document 6 The Proposal Phase 1 UseParking Renovated stadium ± 24,000 seats Renovated Civic Centre ± 11,000 seats Retail ± 270,000 ft 2 Cinema± 8 theatres Aberdeen Pavilion and ± 31,000 ft 2 Horticultural Building Subtotal 1235* *Excludes front yard multi -use activity area which could be used for exceptionally large events (380 parking spaces) 14

15 Document 6 The Proposal (cont’d) Phase 2 Use Parking Residential ± 210 units Office ± 77,000 ft 2 Hotel ± 180 rooms 260 Total Phases 1 + 2 1495 15

16 Document 6 Critical Time Periods of Analysis Time Period Common Activities Typical weekday Retail, hotel, residential, office Typical weekdayRetail, hotel, residential, evenings and weekendscinema Special Events duringRetail*, hotel, residential, evening or weekendcinema*, event afternoon Each situation has varying amounts of walk, bike, transit and motorized vehicles that has to be identified and accommodated *reduced patrons due to “event” 16

17 Document 6 Analysis Findings Typical Weekday Transit service easily provided On-site parking supply of 1495 spaces is sufficient Site’s four driveway connections will operate at acceptable levels of service Traffic distribution 20% QED and 80% Bank 50% of retail traffic existing traffic already on Bank/QED (passby) Maximum two-way traffic increase on QED = 50 vph (4% of existing) Maximum two-way traffic increase on Bank = 215 vph (13% of existing) Daily traffic impacts along Bank Street considered manageable and consistent with successful “Main Street” as per its designation 17

18 Document 6 Analysis Findings Typical Evenings and Weekends Fewer trips for office, hotel, residential, but more cinema and retail trips overall “new” traffic similar to weekday afternoon peak hour trips, but background traffic generally less during these time periods transit service easily provided parking supply considered sufficient site driveway operation and impacts on Bank and QED considered acceptable 18

19 Document 6 Events Analysis Assessed many event sizes and many trip generation variables – 5 event sizes – 5 transit mode split %ages – 3 arrival/departure durations – 2 vehicle occupancy rates Following table is a “snap shot” of the Event sizes into which the significant majority of Civic Centre/Stadium events fall Sound basis for identifying event impacts/requirements 19

20 Document 6 Transportation Analysis of Base Case for Various Event Sizes 20

21 Document 6 Study Area: On-Street Parking Supply Analysis assumed – ±5000 space supply excluding metered spaces – only 3500 available during events City Count Program October 1, 2 and 4, 2009 – 126 on-street permits are currently issued – on-street parking supply actually ±5050 – empty available spaces ±3200 – metered spaces ±210 additional Assumption regarding available parking supply OK for this stage of analysis 21

22 Document 6 How Can Travel Requirements of Event Patrons be Best Accommodated? Learn from Lansdowne Park’s past – transit provision – on-site parking – traffic operations/control – neighbourhood parking/traffic Research on related best practices re: TDM Identify and Implement aggressive but achievable TDM Plan Transportation Strategy 22

23 Document 6 Transportation Strategy: Objectives Reduce on-site vehicle activity Minimize traffic impacts on Bank Street and other primary road corridors Minimize parking and traffic impact on adjacent neighbourhoods Maximize transit use 23

24 Document 6 Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Change travel behaviour More transit, walk, bike, ride share Less motorized vehicle traffic solutions – appropriate infrastructure for alternative travel modes – incentive to use, and dis-incentives of not using 24

25 Document 6 TDM Infrastructure Transit service Pathway connectivity Bicycle parking Virtucar Satellite parking and shuttle buses 25

26 Document 6 TDM Practices Shared-use parking Preferred parking for car poolers Parking rates Discounted employee transit passes Transit ride included in event ticket price – increases transit ridership – optimizes bus operation after event On-site parking only with prepaid ticket 26

27 Document 6 Further Study Requirements Strategy Document includes 24 Action Items Confirm availability and parking supply at satellite parking lots Refine special event transit/shuttle service and Refine Bank Street traffic control More comprehensive Traffic Impact Study for all on-site land uses/activities 27

28 Document 6 OC Transpo and Lansdowne Park OC Transpo’s role is to provide convenient public transit service, following Council’s directions, to all parts of the urban area of the City OC Transpo provides service all day long, every day to Lansdowne Park –Route 1 (Rockcliffe Park-Downtown-South Keys) –Route 7 (St Laurent-Downtown-Carleton University) Combined service now –Every 3-4 minutes during peak periods –Every 7-8 minutes in the midday, Monday-Friday –Every 6-10 minutes in the midday on weekends –Every 15 minutes in the evening, seven days a week 28

29 Document 6 OC Transpo service to Lansdowne Park 29

30 Document 6 Transit service to events at Lansdowne Park Additional trips on Routes 1 and 7 are provided for hockey and other events Additional trips have been provided for football Special service arrangements have been made for very large events (e.g., les Jeux de la Francophonie, Grey Cup, Rolling Stones) Special bus service from park and ride lots and via Queen Elizabeth Drive for very large events Future service for events can be made better with advanced planning that is built into the site and into event organisation 30

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33 Document 6 Day-to-Day Bus service to a redeveloped Lansdowne Park Current service is every 3-4 minutes during peak periods, to accommodate observed levels of ridership Transportation document calculates +350 transit customers to Lansdowne Park during the busiest hour of the morning peak period Additional ridership to/from retail, office, hotel, residential Service would be increased to approximately every 3 minutes Resources (buses, service hours) would be included in transit budget for year of opening (+4 buses, $230,000 net) Service at this level is feasible. 33

34 Document 6 Bus service to a 10,000-person event at Lansdowne Park Transit to carry 20 percent of people attending, or 2000 people 2 min service on Bank Street, one hour before and after event Costs would be funded from charge included in event ticket prices Service at this level is feasible 34

35 Document 6 Bus service to a 20,000-person event at Lansdowne Park Transit to carry 20 percent of people attending – 4000 people Transit to also carry 18 percent of people attending from remote parking lots – 3600 people 1 min service on Bank Street, 90 min before and after event Some trips from City Hall, Carleton University, Confederation Heights 35

36 Document 6 Bus service to a 20,000-person event at Lansdowne Park (cont’d) Some additional trips on Transitway routes to carry people from across the City for connections downtown and at Billings Bridge Costs would be funded from charge included in event ticket prices No special shuttle buses required, no operation on Queen Elizabeth Drive required Service at this level is feasible with appropriate traffic management measures on Bank Street so that buses flow 36

37 Document 6 Bus service to a 40,000-person event at Lansdowne Park Transit to carry 25 percent of people attending – 10,000 people Shuttle buses from remote parking lots to carry another 25 percent of people – 10,000 people Transit buses to operate 2 trips/min on Bank Street, 2 hours before and after event Additional trips required on Transitway routes to carry people from across the City for connections downtown and at Billings Bridge 37

38 Document 6 Bus service to a 40,000-person event at Lansdowne Park (cont’d) May be desirable to provide direct trips from some locations Costs would be funded from charge included in event ticket prices Parking shuttle buses to operate every 3 min from City Hall, every 1-2 min from Carleton University, every 1-2 min from Confederation Heights Parking shuttle buses to operate via Queen Elizabeth Drive to east side of Lansdowne Park Service at this level is feasible with appropriate traffic management measures on Bank Street and Queen Elizabeth Drive so that buses flow 38

39 Document 6 Elements of the Transportation Strategy that support Transit Service for events at Lansdowne Park Events would be outside of peak hours when buses and operators are available Event tickets would include transit fares to allow buses to load quickly Appropriate traffic management would be in place to keep buses moving on Bank Street Pedestrian crossings of Bank Street would be designed and managed to avoid conflict with buses Activity at and around Lansdowne Park would encourage people to arrive early and leave late 39

40 Document 6 In conclusion... Providing transit service to carry customers is what we do We have provided service of this type to Lansdowne Park in the past and can do so in the future The level of transit service foreseen is feasible to operate There are elements of the strategy that assure feasibility Advanced planning that is built into the site will make event service better than it has been in the past 40

41 Document 641

42 Document 6 Traffic Management Mandate Managing movement of traffic on City’s Transportation Network Ensuring this is done in an effective and efficient manner: –For day to day needs –For special events and activities –For all users 42

43 Document 6 Traffic Incident Management Group Inputs (i.e. Event info, weather, etc.) Traffic Incident Management Group (TIMG) City of Ottawa Public Works Emergency Services Public Affairs Ottawa Police Services OC Transpo National Capital Commission (NCC) Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) Others i.e. Event Organizers 43

44 Document 6 Level of Effort for Events at Lansdowne Park + 44

45 Document 6 Managing Road Network during Lansdowne Park Events Integration of Public Works with OC Transpo, Police, NCC, MTO and event organizers; Traffic Management Plans are developed for each type of event; Ensure that traffic entering and exiting site is done in most efficient and effective manner; and, For major events broader network is assessed and managed. 45

46 Document 6 Traffic Control Center 46

47 Document 6 Traffic Management during Events at Lansdowne No Events –Signal timing plans change to accommodate variation in traffic flows throughout the day Up to 10,000 people (hockey) –Pre-planned signal timing implemented –Increased traffic flows start approximately 1 to 1.5 hours before event –Event is normally cleared within an hour of the end of the event 47

48 Document 6 Traffic Management during events Up to 20,000 people (football) –Pre-planned signal timing implemented –Staff at Traffic Control Center monitoring traffic with traffic cameras and adjusting signal timing as required –Changes to parking regulations as required in consultation with Councillor, Community Association and BIA –Increased traffic flows begin about 90 minutes to 2 hours before event and is cleared within 90 minutes of the end of the event 48

49 Document 6 Traffic Management During Events Over 40,000 people (Grey Cup, Rolling Stones) –Traffic Incident Management Group manages weeks/months in advance; –Develop traffic management plans for event Priority given to OC Transpo service to get to and from park and ride lots and transitway Road closures, parking restrictions, temporary bus lanes Communications plan; –Consultation with Councillor, Community Association, and BIA; and, –TIMG at Traffic Control Center monitoring event 49

50 Document 6 Grey Cup - 2004 Working Group created to develop traffic management plan – met weekly Consulted with Community Association and businesses Road closures, parking restrictions, and bus lanes on Bank St Shuttle bus from City Hall and bus only access on Queen Elizabeth Driveway Park and Ride lots (Carleton University, Confederation Heights, Algonquin College area and existing P&R lots) Taxi shuttle on Monk St Advertising Campaign Increase in traffic began about 2 hours prior to event and 50,000 people were cleared from site within 2 hours 50

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53 Document 6 In Conclusion… Ensuring the Transportation Network operates efficiently and effectively is what we do –We have done in the past … –We do it today … –We will continue in the future to put plans in place built on the experiences of the present … 53

54 Document 6 Summary and Next Steps Transportation strategy embodies principles and directions of OP and TMP in the context of CC Directions of April 22 –Directions provided for revitalizing stadium and Civic center –Reducing hard surface area and increasing green and public open space –Enhancing links to Pedestrian and cycle systems –Advancing transit options Strategy focused on day to day and special events Strategy builds on past experiences Strategy is high level - while a certain level of assessment had been done to confirm that it can be made to work, additional detailed work remains to be done to develop a Transportation Demand Management Plan for the LPP The additional work would be undertaken through a more detailed Transportation Study 54

55 Document 6 Summary and Next Steps (cont’d) Key areas where additional work is required as part of the study to develop the plan include the following: –Confirm availability of on-street parking –Secure arrangements with off-site parking lot owners (Carleton University, Confederation Heights) –Continued discussions with NCC to confirm opportunities options related to the QED –Determining specifics of transit operational requirements for various event sizes –Determining specific traffic management requirements to support transit needs for various events sizes –Develop aggressive TDM promotional and communications initiatives that would be rolled out for events 55

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