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Using Data to Improve Student Achievement: November 17 th, 2011 A Conversation with members of the Montana Education and Local Government Interim Committee.

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Presentation on theme: "Using Data to Improve Student Achievement: November 17 th, 2011 A Conversation with members of the Montana Education and Local Government Interim Committee."— Presentation transcript:

1 Using Data to Improve Student Achievement: November 17 th, 2011 A Conversation with members of the Montana Education and Local Government Interim Committee Aimee Rogstad Guidera On the Web: DataQualityCampaign.org On

2 Setting the Context: Why Data MattersWhy Data Matters

3 Doing More with Less Improve student outcomes Improve efficiencies Increase transparency Improve system performance Effective use of data Increasing expectations Decreasing resources

4 Changing the Culture around Data  In the education sector, leaders… o Make decisions by hunch or anecdote o Throw darts hoping to hit the bullseye  In all other sectors, leaders… o Make decisions based on data o Have dashboards at their fingertips  To get from “here” to “there”, leaders… o Must lead a culture change o Support data use for continuous improvement

5 The Data Quality Campaign: A National Non-Profit Advocacy Organization

6 Changing the Culture Around Data Use

7 States Have Made Unprecedented Progress Toward Building State Longitudinal Data Systems No state had all 10 Essential Elements 24 states report that they have all 10 Essential Elements

8 Lagging Essential Elements are those MOST Critical to Current Reform Efforts Essential ElementData for Action 2010 (# of States) 1A unique student identifier52 2Student-level enrollment, demographic, and program participation information 52 3The ability to match individual students’ test records from year to year to measure academic growth 52 4Information on untested students49 5A teacher identifier system with the ability to match teachers to students 35 6Student-level transcript information, including information on courses completed and grades earned 37 7Student-level college readiness test scores46 8Student-level graduation and dropout data52 9The ability to match student records between the P-12 and postsecondary systems 41 10A state audit system assessing data quality, validity, and reliability states cannot link teacher and student data 15 states do not collect course- taking information 11 states can’t connect K-12 and higher education Montana is missing elements 5, 6 and 7

9 Montana: Missing Critical Elements »A teacher identifier system with the ability to match teachers to their students »Student-level transcript information, including information on courses completed and grades earned »Student level college readiness test scores- such as the ACT, SAT and AP exam »Montana is the only state to still be lacking more than two elements

10 States Have Not Taken Action to Support Data Use 2010 No state has taken all 10 State Actions

11 ImperativeAction# of states Link data systems across P-20 and the workforce to answer key questions 1. Link state K-12 data systems with early learning, postsecondary, workforce, and other 9 2. Create sustainable support for LDS32 3. Develop governance structures to guide LDS40 4. Build state data repositories40 Ensure that appropriate data can be accessed while protecting privacy 5. Provide timely role-based access to data8 6. Create progress reports with student-level data for educators, students, & parents to make individual decisions Create reports with longitudinal statistics to guide change at system level 27 Build capacity of all stakeholders to use longitudinal data 8. Develop a research agenda28 9. Implement policies to ensure educators know how to use data appropriately Raise awareness to ensure all key stakeholders know how to access and use data 9 43 states, including Montana, cannot link data Data Are Not Linked and Accessible, and Stakeholders- like you- Do Not Have Capacity To Use Data

12 Early ChildhoodK-12PostsecondaryWorkforce Which early childhood programs best prepare students for kindergarten? To what degree are high school math grades predictors of readiness for college math? What industries are most employing high school and college graduates? How successful are college graduates in the workforce by major or credential? What is the graduation rate by high school? Critical Policy Questions: The Importance of Longitudinal Data

13 Kentucky: Providing High Schools With Feedback on Postsecondary Preparedness

14 ImperativeAction# of states Link data systems across P-20 and the workforce to answer key questions 1. Link state K-12 data systems with early learning, postsecondary, workforce, and other 9 2. Create sustainable support for LDS32 3. Develop governance structures to guide LDS40 4. Build state data repositories40 Ensure that appropriate data can be accessed while protecting privacy 5. Provide timely role-based access to data8 6. Create progress reports with student-level data for educators, students, & parents to make individual decisions Create reports with longitudinal statistics to guide change at system level 27 Build capacity of all stakeholders to use longitudinal data 8. Develop a research agenda28 9. Implement policies to ensure educators know how to use data appropriately Raise awareness to ensure all key stakeholders know how to access and use data 9 44 states, including Montana, don’t provide timely access to data Data Are Not Linked and Accessible, and Stakeholders- like you- Do Not Have Capacity To Use Data

15 Colorado: Comparing growth by district and school

16 Colorado: Examining individual student growth

17 Prioritizing the End User: DQC Highlights the State of GeorgiaGeorgia

18 ImperativeAction# of states Link data systems across P-20 and the workforce to answer key questions 1. Link state K-12 data systems with early learning, postsecondary, workforce, and other 9 2. Create sustainable support for LDS32 3. Develop governance structures to guide LDS40 4. Build state data repositories40 Ensure that appropriate data can be accessed while protecting privacy 5. Provide timely role-based access to data8 6. Create progress reports with student-level data for educators, students, & parents to make individual decisions Create reports with longitudinal statistics to guide change at system level 27 Build capacity of all stakeholders to use longitudinal data 8. Develop a research agenda28 9. Implement policies to ensure educators know how to use data appropriately Raise awareness to ensure all key stakeholders know how to access and use data 9 51 states, including Montana, have not taken steps to build educator capacity Data Are Not Linked and Accessible, and Stakeholders- like you- Do Not Have Capacity To Use Data

19 Teachers want to know how to use data! Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, Use of Education Data at the Local Level From Accountability to Instructional Improvement, Washington, D.C., 2010

20 Building Stakeholder Capacity: Getting to Action 9 Traditional Responsibility Service DistrictProvide educator training to tailor instruction and inform school-wide policies and practices DistrictProvide educator training on interpreting and using specific reports StateIn pre-service policies, data literacy is a requirement for licensure purposes, and data literacy is a requirement of state program approval StateData and performance data are automatically shared with teacher preparation programs SLDS can augment and provide support for these services through its greater capacity

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22 By Working Together, We Get There Faster Higher Capacity District Lower Capacity District State Improved Student Outcomes When states and districts collaborate around data use each single entity and the entire system can gain more powerful results- improving student achievement and system performance.

23 Key Principles of State-District Collaboration: A Framework for States 1 Maximize efficiency and minimize burden in data collection 2 Identify and respond to the variety of need for both higher and lower capacity districts 3 Transform district data into actionable information based on user, type and need and disseminate to districts 4 Establish policies and practices to build the capacity of all educators to use data to inform decision-making

24 Maximizing Data, Minimizing Risk Minimize risk, and protect privacy, security, and confidentiality. Maximize effective data use and improve student achievement …doing so will also improve data quality and increase data management efficiency

25 Page 5 State policymakers have three overarching responsibilities to protect the privacy, security and confidentiality of student’s personally identifiable information: 1.Establish roles for data stewardship 2.Ensure policy documentation, transparency, & enforcement 3.Support organizational capacity State policies and practices must be designed to: Justify that the student data being collected and stored are necessary, useful, accurate and valid Limit access to personally identifiable information to necessary and appropriate individuals Protect data that are shared from inappropriate use Implement a security framework that protects student information Provide public and parental notice about data collection, policies, access and use

26 Conversations are changing… Link data across systems Ensure appropriate access Build capacity for use …but there’s more work to be done to support effective data use… …and that requires tackling tough territory. TurfTrust Technical Issues Time As a result of states’ progress…

27 Montana State Context Madalyn Quinlan Montana Office of Public Instruction

28 Leadership is Imperative DQC Highlights MarylandMaryland

29 How Will We Know When We Are Successful? When all education stakeholders demand and use quality data to make decisions

30 Discussion

31 You can’t use it if you can’t see it: Examples of longitudinal data reports in other states

32 Virginia: Monitoring early warning signs to help students at risk

33 Colorado: Examining Individual Student Growth

34 Florida: Examining individual student achievement

35 Michigan: Understanding real graduation and drop out rates

36 Illinois High School Feedback Report: Comparing ACT scores with Remediation

37 Oregon DATA Project: Building Educator Capacity to Use Data in the Classroom »The Oregon DATA Project went out to on-the-ground stakeholders to find what they needed- developed a gap analysis (what’s missing?) that lead to a Profession Development Roadmap »Strand 1: Creating a Data Culture Targeted to administrators, district leaders and teacher leaders »Strand 2 Using data to improve learning in districts and schools Target to administrators, district leaders and teacher leaders »Strand 3: Using data to improve learning in the classroom Targeted to principals and classroom teachers


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