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Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 1 University of Connecticut Neag School of Education US.

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Presentation on theme: "Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 1 University of Connecticut Neag School of Education US."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 1 University of Connecticut Neag School of Education US DOE #PR333A Joan McGuire Sally Scott Stan Shaw Universal Design For Instruction: An Introduction

2 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 2 Contents Unit 1. The Need for a New Paradigm Unit 2. Universal Design (UD) Unit 3. Universal Design for Instruction (UDI) Unit 4. Side by side: Principles of UD and UDI References

3 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 3 Unit 1. Providing Equal Access to Education for Students with Disabilities:The Need for a New Paradigm

4 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 4 Factors suggesting the need for a new paradigm in providing equal access to postsecondary instruction for diverse learners Increased diversity in the student population Barriers reported by students with disabilities Concerns of postsecondary instructors about the accommodation process

5 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 5 Growing student diversity on college campuses 2001 demographic profile of students: 40% of the student population was 25 or older 12% more women than men were enrolled 31% were racial/ethnic minorities 34% were attending college part-time 20% increase in international students between (Chronicle of Higher Education Almanac, 2003)

6 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 6 Future Projections Ethnicity African American 12.8%13.2% Hispanic 10%15% Asian 5.4%8.4% Caucasian 71.8%62% (Carnevale & Fry, 2000)

7 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 7 Incidence of full-time, first-time college students with disabilities All DisabilitiesLD %no data 19844%1.2% %3.5% Henderson, 1999

8 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 8 Barriers in the learning environment reported by students with LD Unclear expectations Difficulty attaining accommodations Text books in an accessible format Note taking during class lecture University of Connecticut, Universal Design for Instruction Project

9 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 9 Other barriers reported by students with disabilities Stigma of accommodations Self-disclosure concerns Faculty ignorance Faculty teaching styles Heavy workloads on disability services offices University of Hawaii, National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Educational Supports

10 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 10 Instructors’ concerns regarding individual accommodations Is this fair to other students? How do I maintain academic integrity? Are these students qualified to be in my class? How much time will this take? I'm not trained to do this.

11 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 11 Providing access to postsecondary instruction for students with disabilities and other diverse learners traditional approach- making individual accommodations for students with disabilities. a UDI approach- designing instruction to be inclusive of students with disabilities and other diverse learners.

12 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 12 Looking ahead to Unit 2. How can design increase access for a diverse population? Learn how architects and designers use Principles of Universal Design © to create buildings, environments and products that can be used by people of varying abilities and sizes. (Copyright 1997, Center for Universal Design, North Carolina Sate University)

13 Unit 1 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 13 References Carnevale, A., & Fry, R. (2000). Crossing the great divide: Can we achieve equity when generation Y goes to college? Princeton, N.J.: Educational Testing Service. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED443907). Chronicle of Higher Education: Almanac (2003). Washington, DC: The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved May 21, 2004, from: Henderson, C College freshmen with disabilities, statistical year Washington, DC: American Council on Education. Madaus, J. W., Scott, S., & McGuire, J. (2003). Barriers to learning as perceived by postsecondary students with learning disabilities (Tech. Rep. No. 01). Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut. Retrieved April 28, 2004, from: pdf The Center for Universal Design. (1997). Principles of Universal Design version 2.0. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Sate University. Retrieved April 28, 2004, from: University of Hawaii, National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Educational Supports, Research Findings Brief. Retrieved May 24, 2004, from:


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