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Transition Planning December 2008 Presented by The IEP Managers of the Integrated Service Centers.

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Presentation on theme: "Transition Planning December 2008 Presented by The IEP Managers of the Integrated Service Centers."— Presentation transcript:

1 Transition Planning December 2008 Presented by The IEP Managers of the Integrated Service Centers

2 2 Janet Blit IEP Manager Staten Island Integrated Service Center Office: Nicholas Chavarria IEP Manager Brooklyn Integrated Service Center Office: Madeline Rochelle IEP Manager Manhattan Integrated Service Center Office: Tanya Smith IEP Manager Queens Integrated Service Center Office: MaryAnn Vance IEP Manager Bronx Integrated Service Center Office: WELCOME FROM YOUR IEP MANAGERS:

3 3 Transition: Creating The Vision Transitioning Students With Disabilities To Successful Adult Outcomes

4 4 Table of Contents 1.Introduction to Transition 2. Indicator # 13 3.Reflecting Transition In the IEP 4.Student Exit Summary 5.Resources

5 5 Audience Poll Who is in the Audience?

6 6 Part 1 - Introduction to Transition Transition Is: A process An ongoing set of activities Looks at the needs of the whole person/whole life Managed by a team

7 7 Part 1 - Introduction to Transition: Transition Services Help Your Student To Answer These Questions: Who am I? Where am I going? How will I get there?

8 8 Part 1 - Introduction to Transition: Transition Services Help Your Student To: Clarify her/his dreams Identify his/her interests and strengths Apply her/his strengths to future endeavors Identify community supports

9 9 Part 1 - Introduction to Transition The Transition Process Throughout the Transition Process there must be: >Student input >Family input >School input In the year that the student turns 12: A Level 1 Vocational Assessment is conducted (See SOPM pages ). In the year that the student turns 14: Incorporate findings from the Level 1 Vocational Assessment into the IEP >Begin using the Transition page (10) of the IEP (Long Term Adult Outcomes only). In the year that the student turns 15: The Measurable Post-Secondary Goals (Long Term Adult Outcomes) are added to the Transition page of the IEP and implemented by the school. >Transition Services begin. In the year the student graduates or leaves school: An Exit Summary must be conducted (See SOPM pages ).

10 10 Part 1 - Introduction to Transition What are Transition Services? A coordinated set of activities designed to be within a results- oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability, to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school activities.

11 11 Part 1 - Introduction to Transition What are Transition Services? (Continued) Transition services include, but are not limited to: >Post-secondary education >Vocational education >Integrated competitive employment >Continuing and adult education >Adult services >Independent living >Community participation

12 12 Part 1 - Introduction to Transition Who Participates in Team Transition Planning? Student Parent/Guardian School Personnel Adult Service Agencies Parent Representative (Advocate, any additional person requested by Parent)

13 13 Audience Poll TRUE OR FALSE

14 14 Part 2: Indicator #13 Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) Indicator #13: Is aligned with IDEIA federal guidelines that evaluates the Transition Process for students with disabilities. Measures the percentage of students aged 15 and above with IEPs that includes coordinated, measurable annual goals and Transition Services to reasonably enable students to meet their measurable post-secondary goals.

15 15 Participate in Transition Focused Reviews to identify issues of non-compliance with state regulations. Identify the number of students aged 15 to 21 years, whose IEPs include appropriate Transition content. NYSED VESID, DJ, 3/29/06 Part 2: Indicator #13 Indicator #13 Requires Schools to:

16 16 Students must be invited to and actively participate in planning their educational programs, leading toward achievement of post- secondary goals. IEPs are individualized and based on student assessment, including student strengths, needs, preferences and interests. Student present levels of performance include identified Transition needs. NYSED VESID, DJ, 3/29/06 Part 2: Indicator #13 State Focused Review Quality Indicators:

17 17 Part 2: Indicator #13 Quality Indicators (Continued) Annual Goals address student Transition needs identified in the present levels of performance. Each annual goal is calculated to help the student progress incrementally toward post-secondary goals. Recommended special education programs and services relate to Transition and assist the student in meeting his/her annual goals. The attainment of the student’s post-secondary goals is linked to a course of study. NYSED VESID, DJ, 3/29/06

18 18 Part 2: Indicator #13 Quality Indicators ( continued) Statements of needed Transition Services are based on the students’ needs, preferences and interests. They are directly related to the student’s measurable post-secondary goals. The school, along with appropriate participating agencies, coordinates activities to support the student’s post-secondary goals. NYSED VESID, DJ, 3/29/06

19 19 Audience Poll Which element is not part of a Transition IEP?

20 20 Part 3 - Reflecting Transition In the IEP The IEP Must Include Statements that show the connections among transition activities in the following areas: Instruction Related services Community experiences The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives Acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation, where appropriate

21 21 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Transition Elements The following areas of the IEP must contain Transition elements: Present Level of Performance Measurable Annual Goals Measurable Post Secondary Goals Special Education Services Coordinated Transition Activities Participating Agency Assistance

22 22 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Present Levels of Performance The Present Levels of Performance narrative must reflect: Direct student involvement in determining preferences and interests, transition needs and post-secondary goals. Student’s strengths, abilities, rate of learning, learning style, accommodations; How the disability affects progress in general education curriculum; Student’s progress Relevant data from both formal /informal assessments and observations Transition Needs

23 23 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Sample Present Levels of Performance Example: Carmen’s* parents report that she enjoys caring for the family pets and visiting the neighborhood pet store. Carmen stated that she likes to talk with the employees at the pet store. She says that she learns best when listening to what people say. She identifies and watches special programs on television and the internet about animals. Carmen says that she wants to work as a veterinary assistant.** Informal and formal assessments reveal that Carmen is reading at a fourth grade level, due to weak decoding skills. She struggles with writing primarily because of challenges with spelling. Carmen has mastered the four basic arithmetic operations with whole numbers, fractions and decimals. She can solve simple algebra problems. Her math reasoning skills, including basic knowledge of geometry are near grade level, but problem solving is affected by her reading difficulty. Carmen needs to develop pre- employment skills such as: resume writing, completion of school and employment applications and interviewing skills. * Carmen is 15 and in the ninth grade. ** This is a example of student interest transition statement.

24 24 Annual Goals help students achieve their post-secondary goals. Student goals must be unique to each student. Example 1: In one year, Carmen will complete a log containing 3-paragraph entries reflecting information learned from watching 20 documentaries or informational shows about animals, on television and on the internet, related to animals and animal care professions. Progress will be evaluated monthly (one entry per documentary, two full entries per month) by the teacher’s review of the log. NYSED VESID, DJ, 3/29/06 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Annual Goals

25 25 Example 2: One year from now, during a simulated job interview with a staff member, Carmen will respond appropriately to ten questions used in interviews with 100% accuracy in 3 out of 4 weekly trials. NYSED VESID, DJ, 3/29/06 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Annual Goals (continued)

26 26 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Annual Goals (Continued) All Annual Goals (Transition or otherwise) need to be SMART! S – Specific M – Measurable A – Achievable R – Relevant T – Time related Follow the color scheme in order to understand the different components of Carmen’s annual goal.

27 27 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Annual Goals (Continued) All Annual Goals (Transition or otherwise) need to be SMART! From Example 1: In one year, Carmen will complete a log containing 3-paragraph entries reflecting information learned from viewing 20 documentaries or informational shows about animals, on television and on the internet, related to animals and animal care professions. Progress will be evaluated monthly (one entry per documentary, two full entries per month) by the teacher’s review of the log.

28 28 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Annual Goals (Continued) Starting in the year that a student reaches the age of 15 all Annual Goals should relate to Transition. Example: (Carmen will need to improve her reading to achieve her post- secondary goals.) In one year, using a sequential multi-sensory program, Carmen will demonstrate mastery of the six syllable types and, given a three-paragraph passage containing fifth grade level multi-syllabic words, Carmen will fluently read the passage aloud, with no more than one error, as measured by five consecutive weekly oral reading tests. Suggested activity: When you download this presentation, test this Annual Goal for SMART.

29 29 Audience Poll Which one is NOT a Long Term Adult Outcome?

30 30 Beginning in the year the student turns 14, or younger if appropriate, the IEP must include a statement of Long-Term Adult Outcomes (these are the Measurable Post-Secondary Goals) in the following four areas: Community Integration Post-Secondary Placement Independent Living Employment NYSED VESID, DJ, 3/29/06 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Measurable Post-Secondary Goals

31 31 Example: Long-term Adult Outcomes (beginning at age 14) Community Integration –Carmen will integrate into the community independently. Post-Secondary Placement – Carmen will enroll in a two-year job training program. Independent Living – Carmen will rent her own apartment after she is employed. Employment – Carmen’s career goal is to be competitively employed as a veterinary assistant. NYSED VESID, DJ, 3/29/06 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Measurable Post-Secondary Goals (Continued)

32 32 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Programs and Services Secondary students’ IEPs must include special education programs, services and transition activities that are: > coordinated > formulated to reasonably enable students to meet their annual and measurable post-secondary goals.

33 33 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Transition Services Transition Services must begin the school year that the student turns 15. The following areas are to be addressed: Instructional Activities Community Integration Post High School Independent Living Acquisition of Daily Living Skills (as needed)

34 34 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Transition Services (Continued) Transition Services must begin the school year that the student turns 15. Example: Transition Services Instructional Activities – Carmen will improve literacy in order to be competitively employed. Projects will enhance knowledge of animals and animal care. Community Integration – Carmen will volunteer at the local ASPCA Post High School – Carmen will participate in training to research programs and community colleges that offer programs in animal care. She will learn how to create a resume and fill out applications. She will participate in mock interviews with school staff members. Independent Living - Carmen will study budgeting, management of a checking account and general banking skills. Acquisition of Daily Living Skills (as needed)- Carmen does not require this option.

35 35 Part 3: Reflecting Transition In the IEP Participating Agency Identify any agency outside of the school district that will be providing specific transition services to the student. If the participating agency does not provide the agreed-upon service, the CSE must reconvene to determine an appropriate course of action.

36 36 Audience Poll When must the Exit Summary be Completed for a Student?

37 37 Part 4: Student Exit Summary “THE STUDENT EXIT SUMMARY A student Exit Summary must be completed for: All public school students and students who are attending non-public schools; and For whom special education services will terminate in the current year because the student will receive a Regent, local or IEP diploma or reach the age of 21. The summary should provide a meaningful picture of the exiting student’s strengths, abilities, skills, functional and academic levels, needs, limitations, necessary accommodations and recommendations that will support the student’s goals after leaving the New York City school system. The summary will assist the student in establishing eligibility for reasonable accommodations and supports in post-secondary education, the workplace and the community.” SOPM 2008, p. 89

38 38 Part 4: Exit Summary Purpose: To provide Students with Disabilities (SWD’s) with a written report of essential information that: >Supports the student’s Transition from high school >Helps the student become a self-advocate >Assists the student in establishing eligibility for reasonable accommodations in post-secondary settings and for adult vocational rehabilitation services >Facilitates the student’s acquisition of financial benefits and residential placements, as appropriate

39 39 Part 4: the Exit Summary Requirements IDEIA states: All students who have IEP’s and 504 plans must be provided with a summary of: >Academic achievement >Functional performance >Recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting their post- secondary goals Student Exit Summaries should be completed during the final year of high school and provided to the student prior to school exit.

40 40 Part 4: the Exit Summary Development Student Exit Summary should be completed through a team process which may involve any or all of the following: Students and families Special education teacher (s) General education teacher (s) Psychologist Related service providers Adult agency personnel

41 41 Part 4: Exit Summary Exit Summary: Part 1 – Background Information Date Completed:________________________ Student Name:__________________________________________________ Student Date of Birth:_______________ Date of Graduation/Exit:____________________ Reason for Exit: Regents Diploma Local Diploma IEP Diploma Student to exceed age eligibility Individual Completing Form________________________________________ Phone :__________________________________________________ Title:___________________________________ Number:_____________________

42 42 Part 4: Exit Summary Exit Summary: Part 2- Summary of Present Levels of Performance Academic or Functional Area / Present Levels of Performance Reading (e.g., basic reading/decoding and reading comprehension) Math (e.g., calculation skills, problem solving, quantitative reasoning) Language (e.g., written expression, speaking, spelling) Learning Characteristics (e.g., classroom participation, note-taking, homework and time management; study skills) Social and Behavioral Development (e.g., interaction with teachers/peers; responsiveness to services and accommodations; degree of involvement in extra-curricular activities; emotional or behavioral issues related to learning and attention) Physical Development and Medical Conditions

43 43 Part 4: Exit Summary Exit Summary: Part 3- Accommodations and Supports Indicate whether the student currently requires accommodations, including but not limited to assistive technology and environmental or material resources or modifications.

44 44 Part 4: Exit Summary Exit Summary: Part 4 - Student’s Postsecondary Goals Identify the post-school environment the student intends to transition to upon completion of his/her high school education and draft goals accordingly. Education and /or career training Employment Independent Living

45 45 Part 4: Exit Summary Exit Summary: Part 5 – Recommendations that may assist the student in reaching post-secondary goals Recommendations that may assist the student in reaching post-secondary goals

46 46 Part 4: Exit Summary Exit Summary: Part 6- Identify organizations or agencies to provide linkage support (as appropriate) Provide specific contact information for individuals and/or agencies, if available.

47 47 Part 5: Resources For a copy of the Exit Summary, located within the Standard Operating Procedures Manual (SOPM) Some Federal and State agencies that provide adult services/benefits include: Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID) Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities (OMRDD) Social Security Administration (SSA) Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped (CBVH) Office of Mental Health (OMH) Independent Living Centers (ILC’s) Other resources helpful when transitioning to adult services include: >Social Security Disability Benefits Planner >Post Secondary Education Planning Guide >New York Learns

48 48 Janet Blit IEP Manager Staten Island Integrated Service Center Office: Nicholas Chavarria IEP Manager Brooklyn Integrated Service Center Office: Madeline Rochelle IEP Manager Manhattan Integrated Service Center Office: Tanya Smith IEP Manager Queens Integrated Service Center Office: MaryAnn Vance IEP Manager Bronx Integrated Service Center Office: …the One Place to turn to We are here to serve you.


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