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Secondary Transition Patricia L. Anderson, Ph.D. CT State Department of Education Bureau of Special Education 860-713-6923

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Presentation on theme: "Secondary Transition Patricia L. Anderson, Ph.D. CT State Department of Education Bureau of Special Education 860-713-6923"— Presentation transcript:

1 Secondary Transition Patricia L. Anderson, Ph.D. CT State Department of Education Bureau of Special Education

2  Transition Planning assists a student and his/her family in “creating a vision” of what life will look like in the future –  Postsecondary Education or Training  Employment  Independent Living /Community Participation  “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

3  Family involvement  Social skills  Integration/LRE  Independence/Responsibility  Interests/Preferences  Futures planning/Goal-setting  Community-based instruction/activities  Community service/volunteer work  Paid work experience  Interagency collaboration  Vocational training Adapted from Best Practices in Transition by Paula Kohler

4  Coordinated set of activities  Result-oriented process  Improve academic AND functional achievement  Movement from school to post-school  Activities (integrated and inclusive)  Based on needs, including strengths, preferences and interests

5  Required by IDEA 2004  A 6-year plan describing the State’s performance on 20 indicators  14 indicators required for compliance  Reports progress through the Annual Progress Report (APR)

6 Secondary Transition  Indicator #13 – Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate, measurable, postsecondary goals that are annually updated and based upon an age-appropriate transition assessment, transition services, including courses of study, that will reasonably enable the student to meet those postsecondary goals, and annual IEP goals related to the student’s transition services needs.

7 Secondary Transition  Indicator #13 – (continued) There also must be evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting where transition services are to be discussed and evidence that, if appropriate, a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority. (20 U.S.C. 1416(a)(3)(B))

8 Transition Services – IDEA 2004  Transition Services – § (b)  Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child turns 16, or younger  Updated annually, thereafter  IEP must include –  Appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments  Related to postsecondary education or training, employment, and if appropriate, independent living skills (OSEP, 2007)  Transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist child in reaching postsecondary goals

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10  Special Education is an “entitlement” program  Adult services are “eligibility” programs  The capacity of the adult systems cannot and do not match the services and supports that students receive under IDEA

11 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act – IDEA  Free and appropriate education  Serves all students with disabilities  Program modifications IEP  Parent involvement Americans with Disabilities Act – ADA  Civil rights legislation  Serves qualified students with disabilities  Accommodations determined by documentation  Student self-advocates  Ensures access – not success

12 An ongoing process of gathering information that will help students, educators, and family members make informed decisions about life, during and after high school... specifically in the areas of college, training, employment and independent living.

13  Promotes the participation of students and parents in the IEP meeting process.  Ensures that a student’s interests and preferences are considered when the IEP Team is planning his/her program.  Must document how student’s input was obtained in planning his/her educational program if did not attend the IEP meeting.

14  How do you know what PSOGS or annual goals to write in an IEP?  What is recorded on Page 6 of the IEP, #3?  What is recorded on pages 4 & 5 of the IEP – Present Levels of Performance?  What do you do with the information on pages 4 & 5?

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17 Impact of Indicator #13 on LEAs  Every IEP that is written for a student who will turn 16 during the course of the school year MUST include transition planning (i.e., Post- School Outcome Goal Statements –PSOGSs; annual goals & related objectives; and transition services).  The “transition planning” box in the “Reason for Meeting” section of page 1 of the IEP should be checked in addition to any other appropriate reasons when holding a Planning and Placement Team (PPT) meeting to discuss transition goals and objectives.

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20  Initiates the referral process to any appropriate adult agency or service, so the referral is completed prior to exit from special education  Ensures that agency personnel that could provide services and support for a student once he/she graduates, are part of the planning process

21  Agency participation  IEP Team – § (b)(3) To the extent appropriate, with the consent of the parents or a child who has reached the age of majority,... When considering postsecondary goals for the child and the transition services needed to assist the child in reaching those goals..., the public agency must invite a representative of any participating agency that is likely to be responsible for providing or paying for transition services.

22  Item 4 – evidence that PPT has considered whether a representative of an outside agency/ service is appropriate to be invited to participate in the transition planning process  postsecondary education  vocational education  integrated employment [including supported employment]  adult services  independent living/community participation

23  No, not appropriate to invite a representative from an outside agency;  No, written consent to invite a representative was not provided - (inviting an outside agency may be appropriate but written consent was not granted); or  No, no outside agency was invited. (This was not done by the district.)

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25  A Post-School Outcome Goal Statement is “generally understood to refer to those goals that a child hopes to achieve after leaving secondary school” (IDEA 2004 Part B Regulations, § (b), discussion of Final Rule p. 46,668)  A Post-School Outcome Goal Statement is NOT the process of pursuing or moving toward a desired outcome. National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center:

26  Non-Examples:  After high school, Jodi will explore taking classes at the local community college.  The fall after graduation from high school, Allison plans to enroll in a four-year university in the Southeast.  Marianne will complete all academic coursework in preparation for going to a four-year college.

27  Non-Examples:  Alejandro wants to work as a welder.  Vanessa will work with the vocational rehabilitation services to ensure competitive employment.  Upon completion of high school, Kevin will express his preferences related to his postsecondary employment options, given picture symbols on an augmentative communication device.

28  Upon completion of high school, Ted will enroll in the general Associates Degree program at the local community college in September of  Participation in postsecondary education is the focus of this post-school outcome goal statement.  Enrollment at a community college can be observed, as in Ted enrolls in courses or he does not.  Enrollment at a community college occurs after graduation.

29  The fall after high school, Juanita will enroll in courses (non-degree) at the local community college.  Participation in postsecondary education is the focus of this post-school outcome goal statement.  Enrollment in courses (or not) can be observed.  The goal will occur after Juanita leaves high school.

30  Carol will independently attend culinary training at the XYZ Center after exiting from high school, so that she can obtain entry level employment within the food services industry.  Participation in training, employment, and independent living skills are part of this post-school outcome goal statement.  Enrollment in the culinary training program and entry level employment in food services job can be observed.  Participation in the training will occur after exiting from high school.

31  Upon completion of high school, Joan will work independently in a competitive employment setting in the clerical field.  Employment and independent living skills are the focus of this post-school outcome goal statement.  Employment in a competitive clerical position can be observed.  It is stated that this goal will occur upon completion from high school.

32  After finishing high school Alex will increase his work hours in the business department of a local office supply store, contacting XYZ Agency for employment support services.  Participation in employment is the focus of this post- school outcome goal statement.  Increasing work hours is measurable.  The expectation, or behavior, is explicit, as in Alex continues employment and accesses adult agency services (or not).  It is stated in this goal that increased employment and use of adult services will occur after Alex leaves high school.

33  After high school, Jeremy will improve his social, self-advocacy, and self-care skills by attending instruction at a center-based adult day program.  Training and independent living skills are the focus of this post-school outcome goal statement.  Improving the skills noted is an explicit outcome for Jeremy.  Improving skills and attending the program are observable goals that will occur after Jeremy leaves high school.

34  After graduation, Rolanda will live at home and participate to the maximum extent possible in her daily routines (e.g., feeding, dressing, bathing, activating small appliances/media devices, choice making) and environment through the use of technology.  Post-school outcome goal statement is focused on independent living (residential, self-care, community participation, communication skills).  Goal is stated in an explicit manner that can be observed (i.e., “will live”, “participate.”)  The post-school outcome goal statement identifies outcomes for Rolanda after high school, not activities or processes toward outcomes.

35  Upon completion of high school, Mason will obtain competitive employment in a field of his choice.  Participation in employment is the focus of this goal.  Employment in a competitive job can be observed and measured.  This goal will occur after completion of high school.

36  After graduation from high school, Shelia will participate in training that is required for her to obtain competitive employment in the field of her choice.  Participation in training and employment is the focus of this goal.  Employment in a competitive job and participation in training can be observed and measured.  This goal will occur after completion of high school.

37  Chris will attend a postsecondary education program after high school in preparation for obtaining competitive employment.  Participation in postsecondary education and employment is the focus of this goal.  Employment in a competitive job and participation in a postsecondary education program can be observed and measured.  This goal will occur after completion of high school.

38  For each Post-School Outcome Goal Statement, there must be an Annual Goal(s) and Objectives included in the IEP that will help the student make progress towards the stated postsecondary goal(s).

39 Employment Does the student’s IEP include consideration of: ___Enrollment in the highest level of academic coursework to ensure students are gaining the skills to advance to the best career opportunities; ___Supporting and enhancing the skills required to be successful in a variety of employment settings through school curricula; ___Enrollment in coursework to enhance skill development in technologies (business, computers); ___Sequencing of employment curricula from career awareness to career exploration to specific skills training that matches interests and preferences; ___Movement of career training experiences from in-school to community-based settings; ___Exposure to appropriate workplace behaviors (task persistence, punctuality, effective communication); ___Workplace accommodations, if appropriate; ___Teaching self-advocacy skills so the student can articulate learning strengths and weaknesses and share information with others; ___Development of employment goals and objectives that includes student/family input; ___Development of social skills; ___Linkages to state agencies/community resources, if appropriate; ___Utilization of Assistive Technology, if appropriate.

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41  Professional Development & Resources:  Transition Assessment and the IEP – SERC  Bureau of Special Education Web site: PPT – Writing Transition Goals and Objectives – PSOGS  Topic Brief - Post-School Outcome Goal Statements: Frequently Asked Questions

42  Additional Issues  Transition planning should be a “student-driven” process.  Transition assessment and career planning for a student with an IEP must include activities and services that go beyond what any student would receive through general education (e.g., career interest inventory or college selection information provided via school counselor or career center).  TWNDP - For students 18 + receiving transition/ vocational services most appropriate to NOT be in HS building.

43  Additional Issues  In some LEAs that do not have a dedicated high school, students might need transition planning in middle school to assist with the decision about which school to attend, including the option of a technical high school.  Transition assessment and career planning for a student with an IEP must include activities and services that go beyond what any student would receive through general education (e.g., career interest inventory or college selection information provided via school counselor or career center).

44  Additional Issues  # 7. At least one year prior to reaching the age of 18, the student must be informed of her/his rights under IDEA which will transfer at age 18.  NA (Student will not be 17 within one year)  The student has been informed of her/his rights under IDEA which will transfer at age 18  No IDEA rights will transfer  Explore options with family and student  Written statement for continued parental involvement  Power of Attorney (full or limited) - Attorney  Guardianship/Conservatorship – Probate Court

45  New SDE/SERC Publications:  Building a Bridge (also in Spanish)  Directory of Transition Services in College, University and Community-Based Settings  Directory of Transition/Vocational Service Providers  Transition Services Survey Summary Report  CT DCDT Chapter – NEW!  Council of Exceptional Children (CEC) – Division of Career Development and Transition

46  Percent of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school and were (within one year of leaving high school):  Enrolled in higher education;  Enrolled in HE or competitively employed;  Enrolled in HE, or in some type of postsecondary education or training program, or competitively employed or in some other employment.

47  Preparation for college  Transition services during a “bridge” or “fifth” year  Up-to-date preparation skills for competitive employment  Ac cess to assistive technology for ALL students to transition to college and/or work  Post-School Outcome Goal Statements for students in “unique” circumstances

48  Help students to understand how their disability impacts them in school, work and social settings  Help students to learn how to use a range of accommodations, effective learning strategies, and assistive technology  Expose students to a range of opportunities beyond high school  Involve students in their IEP meetings  Foster independent decision-making and self- advocacy skills

49  Set realistic goals  Encourage gradual independence  Gather information about transition issues  Become familiar with adult service systems  Build self-esteem  Encourage social integration  Encourage self-advocacy  Provide real experiences  Encourage good grooming and work habits  Foster acceptance of constructive criticism  Encourage independent living skills  Plan for “ letting go ”

50 CT State Agencies  Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS)  Assists persons with physical or mental disabilities to prepare for, find or keep a job  Disability must result in a substantial impediment to employment  Must be able to be competitively employed  “Order of Selection” when resources are limited  Individuals with severe disabilities have serious limitations in one or more functional areas

51 CT State Agencies  Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS)  Time-limited services  Collaboration with districts with eligible students as young as age 14  Six transition counselors “embedded” in urban districts: Bridgeport, Hartford, New Britain, New Haven, New London, and Stamford/Norwalk  BRS Transition Committee

52 CT State Agencies  Department of Developmental Services (DDS)  Intellectual and adaptive difficulties present and occurred before the age of 18  IQ of 69 or lower  Adaptive behavior test  Required to apply for Medicaid/Title 19 and Social Security entitlements  Life-long support as needed

53 CT State Agencies  Department of Developmental Services (DDS)  Assist in the preparation for transition by identifying the student’s projected level of support regarding vocational/day needs – NOTIFY as EARLY as possible  Students who have graduated or exited special education services  Funding via fiscal year (July – June)  Collaboration with BRS

54 CT State Agencies  Board of Education and Services for the Blind (BESB)  Comprehensive range of services for children who are legally blind or visually impaired; adults who are legally blind  Braille instruction,  Independent living and social development training,  Provision of adaptive technology and textbooks,  Transition from school to work services,  Mentoring programs, and  Consultation services to local school districts.

55 CT State Agencies  Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) – Young Adult Services (YAS)  Ages 18 – 25 (may be referred at 16)  Chronic and serious mental health illness  Be medically indigent  Priority given to DCF clients  Services:  Housing supports  Clinical supports for mental health issues  Skill building and vocational supports  Fosters independence

56 “There are no secrets to success. It is a result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” Colin Powell

57 “Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day; Teach him how to fish and he will eat for a lifetime.” Chinese Proverb


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