Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Using Transition Assessment Results to Write Transition Plans Dr. Amber McConnell University of Oklahoma Zarrow Center Web: zarrowcenter.ou.edu.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Using Transition Assessment Results to Write Transition Plans Dr. Amber McConnell University of Oklahoma Zarrow Center Web: zarrowcenter.ou.edu."— Presentation transcript:

1 Using Transition Assessment Results to Write Transition Plans Dr. Amber McConnell University of Oklahoma Zarrow Center Web: zarrowcenter.ou.edu

2 Postsecondary Goals Students of transition age must have further education and employment postsecondary goals Independent living optional Students have input and write goals based on answers to three questions: Where do I want to live after completing high school? What type of work do I want to do after completing high school? How do I want to learn to do my job after completing high school? Need to be updated annually

3 Postsecondary Goals

4 Three-Part Transition Assessment Model

5 5 Transition Assessment Model Components 1. Education/Training 2. Employment 3. Independent Living

6 Measurable Annual Goals

7 Annual goal must be measurable A measurable goal includes the behavior or skill that can be measured at periodic intervals against some criterion of success.

8 Annual Goals Need to Include Condition involve the application of skills or knowledge and describe the materials and environment necessary for the goal to be completed. Behavior identifies the performance that is being monitored. Criterion how much, how often, or to what standards the behavior must occur Timeframe usually specified in the number of weeks or a certain date for completion

9 9 Education/Training Assessments Part 1 of the 3-Part Transition Assessment Model To create goals based on academics, functional academics, life centered competencies or career/technical or agricultural training.

10 Guide to Assessing College Readiness Landmark College Assessment Webinars/College-Readiness_Assessment.pdf Webinars/College-Readiness_Assessment.pdf Read each item with student and discuss Provides Assessment for Self-Advocacy to include in annual transition goals Five Domains Academic Skills Self-Understanding Self-Advocacy Executive Functioning Motivation and Confidence

11 Transition Planning Inventory ProEd

12

13 Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) PLAN ACT SAT GED WorkKeys

14 Self-Advocacy Checklists Self-Advocacy crucial self-determination concept Students speak and act on their own behalf Self-Determination and Self-Advocacy Skills Questionnaire Self-Determination and Self-Advocacy Skills Student form Parent form Teacher forms (A & B)

15 TAGG An easy-to-use transition assessment based upon behaviors and experiences research has identified as associated with post-school employment and further education Our TAGG assessment yields priority ranked annual transition goals and an overall strengths and needs profile.TAGG

16 TAGG Constructs Strengths and Limitations Disability Awareness Student Involvement in the IEP Persistence Goal setting and attainment Interacting with Others Employment Support Community

17

18

19 Write an Annual Transition Goal for Education / Training

20 Could you identify Strengths? Needs? Goals?

21 Instruction

22 22 Development of Employment Assessments Part 2 of the 3-Part Transition Assessment Model To create goals based on occupational awareness, employment related knowledge and skills and specific career pathway knowledge and skills.

23 Employment Options Individual Competitive Employment Individual Supported Employment Group Supported Employment At Home or Community-Based Entrepreneurial Jobs

24 Career Clusters Career Tech uses career clusters to sort programs.career clusters

25 25 Vocational Interests for High Achieving Students With Mild Disabilities Group Interest Inventories ACT Explore ACT Plan U.S. Dept of Labor O*NET Interest profiler, ability profiler Look left under Products Select career exploration tools

26

27

28 28 On-Line Free Interest Inventories Nebraska Career Connections

29 29 Career Awareness & Exploration Watching Video Provides numerous videos for students to watch  English or Spanish  Job cluster and skill categories  Horse Training Horse Training  Coast Guard Assistant Coast Guard Assistant  Construction Workers Construction Workers

30 Annual goal must be measurable A measurable goal includes the behavior or skill that can be measured at periodic intervals against some criterion of success.

31 Annual Goals Need to Include Condition involve the application of skills or knowledge and describe the materials and environment necessary for the goal to be completed. Behavior identifies the performance that is being monitored. Criterion how much, how often, or to what standards the behavior must occur Timeframe usually specified in the number of weeks or a certain date for completion

32 Write an Annual Transition Goal for Employment

33 Employment

34 Functional Vocational Evaluation

35 35 Independent Living Assessments Part 3 of the 3-Part Transition Assessment Model (Skills for self-determination, interpersonal interactions, communication, health/fitness and knowledge needed to successfully participate in Adult Lifestyles and other Post School Activities (e.g. skills needed to manage a household, maintain a budget and other responsibilities of an adult.)

36 Life Skills Inventory 15 domains (money, hygiene, safety, etc) Four levels: basic, intermediate, advanced, exceptional Must know 3 of 5 to advance from basic to intermediate Must know the person or have family member complete Cost: free Available athttp://www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/ms/forms/10_2 67.pdfhttp://www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/ms/forms/10_2 67.pdf

37 37 Enderle-Severson Transition Rating Form ESTR-J Students with mild disabilities Parent (available in Spanish) and Teacher version Five Transition areas ESTR-III Students with “more” disabilities Parent and Teacher version Five Transition areas ESTR-S Students with severe/multiple impairments Parent and Teacher versions Employment, Rec/leisure, home living, community participation, and adult life Estr.net (each costs about $2.00)

38 ESTR Automatic Scoring

39 39 Casey Life Skills Web based and FREE!!! Spanish, French or English, with numerous supplemental assessments Youth and caregiver formats Automatically scored and sent to you Can obtain class summaries Provides different levels of questions for students across functioning levels

40 40

41 CLSA Appropriate for all youth ages 14 to 21 regardless of living circumstances (i.e., in foster care, with bio-parents, in group homes or other places). Comprehensive with 113 assessment items categorized within eight areas for skills, knowledge and awareness. Youth can complete one area at a time or finish the whole assessment in approximately minute

42

43

44 44

45

46

47 Younger Youth Youth Assessment Level I (elementary ages) This 33-item assessment is appropriate for younger youth ages 8-9 or any young person with reading and/or developmental challenges. Youth can self- report on communication, daily living, home life, self- care, and work and study skills. Youth Assessment Level II (middle school ages) With 49 items, this assessment is for youth ages Like Youth Level I, it may be useful for young people with reading and/or developmental challenges. It assesses areas in communication, daily living, self- care, social relationships, and work and study skills

48 48 Independent Living Assessments Personal Preference Indicators Informal and free Life Skills Inventory Informal and free Independent Living Skills Assessment (and others) https://sites.google.com/a/apps.edina.k12.mn.us/o din-b-portfolio/independent-living-skills https://sites.google.com/a/apps.edina.k12.mn.us/o din-b-portfolio/independent-living-skills

49 Personal Preference Indicators Interview format Family members, friends, professionals who know student well Designed for students with significant support needs Likes, dislikes, social indicators, choices Health, body clock, future Personal Preference Indicators Cost: free

50 Life Skills Inventory 15 domains (money, hygiene, safety, etc) Four levels: basic, intermediate, advanced, exceptional Must know 3 of 5 to advance from basic to intermediate Must know the person or have family member complete Cost: free Available athttp://www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/ms/forms/10_2 67.pdfhttp://www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/ms/forms/10_2 67.pdf

51 51 Enderle-Severson Transition Rating Form ESTR-J Students with mild disabilities Parent (available in Spanish) and Teacher version Five Transition areas ESTR-III Students with “more” disabilities Parent and Teacher version Five Transition areas ESTR-S Students with severe/multiple impairments Parent and Teacher versions Employment, Rec/leisure, home living, community participation, and adult life Estr.net (each costs about $2.00)

52 Annual goal must be measurable A measurable goal includes the behavior or skill that can be measured at periodic intervals against some criterion of success.

53 Annual Goals Need to Include Condition involve the application of skills or knowledge and describe the materials and environment necessary for the goal to be completed. Behavior identifies the performance that is being monitored. Criterion how much, how often, or to what standards the behavior must occur Timeframe usually specified in the number of weeks or a certain date for completion

54 Write an Annual Transition Goal for Independent Living

55 Daily Living Skills

56 Related Services

57 Community Experiences

58 Interagency Linkages

59

60 + Transition Rulings and Decisions

61 Travis Pace v. the Bogalusa City School Board (2001) Parents allege the school district did not invite other agencies to the transition planning meeting The district documented contact with state and local agencies, yet scheduling conflicts arose SCHEDULING CONFLICTS MAY PRECLUDE ATTENDANCE BY AGENCIES, HOWEVER, SCHOOL MUST DOCUMENT THE CONTACT AND AGREED UPON SERVICES, AND PARENTS MUST BE NOTIFIED OF POSSIBLE SERVICES

62 Caribou School Department (2001) The student was not invited to the transition meeting The transition plan stated “Graduation” as the postsecondary goal for the student “TRANSITION PLANNING MUST BE MORE THAN GRADUATION.” The student was awarded college tuition, incidental costs of college attendance, and tutoring services.

63 Sherri High et al v. Exeter Township School District The student’s postsecondary education goal was to attend college The plan included 32 opportunities for transition counseling, transition assessment, job shadowing and internship, assistance with college testing, and career fair attendance. The student did not complete college While the district helped the student identify her desire to attend college, the district was not required to ensure she was successful in this pursuit.

64 Student with a Disability, 51 IDELR 89 (N.Y. SEA 2008) Parents filed due process, alleging that the district failed to provide an appropriate transition plan. The transition plan contained “attend a postsecondary institution for a Master of Science degree, live independently, and be competitively employed.” The school argued the academic goals were linked to the post-school goal to attend college with math and writing goals. The transition plan was deemed appropriate. Transition services should relate to the student’s post-school goals and annual goals must be linked to that goal.

65 Lancaster Independent School District (1998) Transition services were offered in the last semester of high school Parents stated, “It was unreasonable to expect a student operating on a sixth grade level, in his strongest subject, to take the SAT or know how to start a cosmetology business.” THE SCHOOL DISTRICT WAS ORDERED TO PROVIDE THE RECOMMENDED COUNSELING SERVICES AND TO CONDUCT EVALUATIONS TO DETERMINE WHICH ADDITIONAL TRANSITION SERVICES WERE NEEDED.

66 San Diego Unified School District, 2002 A parent of an 18 year-old with Down Syndrome alleged an inappropriate reading program was a barrier to the student’s post-school employment. The school district focused on learning sight words in the community and first-grade books HEARING OFFICER RULED THAT NO ONE TAUGHT THE STUDENT THE READING SKILLS NEEDED FOR SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT AND INDEPENDENT LIVING, INCLUDING “JOB APPLICATION, JOB DESCRIPTION, MEDICAL PRESCRIPTION, BUS SCHEDULES, MAPS, STORE PRICES, AND FOOD LABELS.” THE DISTRICT PAID FOR A 1-YEAR INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAM.

67 67

68 68 Amber McConnell, Ph.D. University of Oklahoma Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment 338 Cate Center Drive, Room 190 Norman, OK Phone: Web: zarrowcenter.ou.edu For More Information Contact:


Download ppt "Using Transition Assessment Results to Write Transition Plans Dr. Amber McConnell University of Oklahoma Zarrow Center Web: zarrowcenter.ou.edu."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google