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Keys to Accessing Postsecondary Education Presented by Beverly Boggess, Ph. D. Maureen Baldwin-Lamper, M.Ed. Sharon Cronin, M.S. Carole Schuschu, M.Ed.

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Presentation on theme: "Keys to Accessing Postsecondary Education Presented by Beverly Boggess, Ph. D. Maureen Baldwin-Lamper, M.Ed. Sharon Cronin, M.S. Carole Schuschu, M.Ed."— Presentation transcript:

1 Keys to Accessing Postsecondary Education Presented by Beverly Boggess, Ph. D. Maureen Baldwin-Lamper, M.Ed. Sharon Cronin, M.S. Carole Schuschu, M.Ed. Kathleen Sosny, M.Ed. Disabilities Services Community College System of New Hampshire CCSNH

2 NHTI Concord’s Community College, Concord Lakes Region Community College, Laconia Great Bay Community College, Stratham River Valley Community College, Claremont White Mountains Community College, Berlin Nashua Community College, Nashua Manchester Community College, Manchester

3 CCSNH

4

5 DISABILITIES SERVICES Maureen Baldwin-Lamper, Lakes Region Community College, Laconia Beverly Boggess, NHTI Concord’s Community College, Concord Sharon Cronin, Great Bay Community College, Stratham Emma Clifford, River Valley Community College, Claremont Kathleen Sosny, White Mountains Community College, Berlin Donna Szekely, Nashua Community College, Nashua Kevin Wason, Manchester Community College, Manchester

6 It is the mission of the CCSNH Disabilities Services to provide equal educational access, opportunities and experiences to all qualified students with documented disabilities who register with each college’s Disabilities Services Office. Reasonable accommodations are provided to students to allow them to achieve at a level limited only by their abilities and not by their disabilities. Assistance is provided in a collaborative way to help students develop strong and effective independent learning and self-advocacy skills, as they assume responsibility for reaching their academic goals.

7 Unlocking individual potential

8 Advising at CCSNH Advising at each CCSNH campus considers the whole person and reflects a value for lifelong learning.

9 Advising at CCSNH We recommend that each individual reflect upon: his/her own interest areas, specific talents and learning styles in concert with the pursuit of career and employment goals.

10 Advising We recommend consideration of ways for a student to develop transferable skills

11 What can a student do to prepare for next steps after high school? Know his/her own:  Learning Style  Academic levels  Personal Skills  Best Study Methods  Assistive Technology  Activity Level  Career and Work Interests

12 I. Key differences between College Disabilities Services and High School Special Education

13 Key Differences Between High School and College High SchoolCollege Special EducationDisabilities Services IDEA & Section 504American with Disabilities Act Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act IEP or 504 PlanReasonable Accommodation Plan/ Accommodation Letter

14 ADA and 504 These laws protect those that are “otherwise qualified.” The laws only guarantee –“reasonable accommodations” for –“equal access” to curriculum and facilities.

15 Key Differences Between High School and College High SchoolCollege Services are provided. Curriculum can be modified. Services must be requested Laws protect only those students who are deemed “ otherwise qualified ” Students need to meet course objectives and essential elements of the course. There are NO course modifications

16 ADA and 504 The college is “…not required to lower or waive essential requirements.” “In providing an academic adjustment, (the) postsecondary school is not required to lower or effect substantial modifications to essential requirements.” From Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities, U.S. Department of Education, September, 2007.

17 What does “courses are not modified” mean? A modification is a change in the essential elements of a course, either in how or what is taught. At the college level, course material does not change depending on an individual’s abilities, as it can in high school.

18 Specialists inform teacher of Students are responsible for informing students’ needs through an IEP professors of their needs using their reasonable accommodation plan Students disclose a disability through Disabilities Services Key Differences Between High School and College High School College

19 Testing is provided Students need to provide documentation. If re-evaluation is necessary, it is the student’s responsibility to arrange and pay for it. Students’ strengths & challenges Students are expected to develop Are determined by the Specialistsself-advocacy skills Key Differences Between High School and College High School College

20 II. Expectations

21 equal opportunity At college students have equal opportunity to pursue programs and: evaluated will be evaluated against the same standards and course objectives, health, character and technical standards that are ALL required of ALL students.

22 Expectations at College Students need to be “otherwise qualified” –Have a diploma or GED –Meet academic requirements

23 Expectations at College Students are expected to do Independent Academic work –1-3 hours of homework per class hour –Use critical thinking skills –Set one’s own schedule

24 Maintain acceptable academic progress GPA 2.0 or better Comply with conduct code Note: There is no Special Education at college. Expectations at College

25 At college We expect students to become moreindependent,self-directedlearners.

26 III. Process Students need to disclose to access services.

27 Process Provide documentation Meet with Disabilities Services Staff to develop a reasonable accommodation plan.

28 If a student wants to use Disabilities Services, he/she needs to let Disabilities Services know that he/she: has a disability needs support has documentation

29 IV. Documentation To qualify for services, a student needs recent, updated documentation

30 What is “documentation?” The student’s most recent educational test reports Pertinent records from a health care professional Note: The IEP and/or 504 plan may be helpful, but are not sufficient by themselves as full documentation.

31 The student’s records are confidential. and kept separate from… department records admissions decisions registrar records and transcripts

32 Documentation should be Up-to-date Address current level of functioning Support the request for accommodations.

33 Documentation Must include:  diagnosis(es)  The credentials of the professional/ evaluator  Effect of the disability on  MAJOR LIFE ACTIVITY and  EFFECT UPON ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE.

34 Documentation is reviewed on a case-by-case basis based upon: quality, date, completeness

35 Rights and Responsibilities change upon graduation from high school, as noted in KEY DIFFERENCES. Students are responsible. The role of parents changes. –Release of Information

36 Rights and Responsibilities… We recommend this ← excellent resource ←from the U.S. Dept. of ←Education to explain ←the major ←points.

37 V. Methods to foster growth toward a student becoming a more successful, independent, self-directed learner

38 Supports available to the student to address course requirements include: AccommodationsAccommodations Support servicesSupport services Strategies for efficient learningStrategies for efficient learning

39 Supports available to the student to address course requirements include: AccommodationsAccommodations

40 What’s an accommodation? Here are some examples….  Test Accommodations »Extended time (time and a half: for example: for a 60 min. test you can take up to 90 min.) »Separate Quiet Test Environment »Reader for Exams

41 Examples of accommodations  Math  Use of calculator when appropriate to course objectives  Use of formula sheets, when appropriate to course objectives  Language  Use of spell checker  Support with proofreading and editing

42 Supports available to the student to address course requirements include: Support servicesSupport services –Availability varies depending on the CCSNH campus.

43 Supports available to the student to address course requirements include these options (also available to other students): Math Lab Writing Center Reading Center

44 Supports available to the student to address course requirements include these options (also available to other students): Peer Tutoring Mentoring Computer Lab Computer-Assisted Instruction- “Plato” Study Strategies Classes –College Success Seminar

45 Supports available … Assistive Technology Note: availability varies at each campus; s Note: availability varies at each campus; some restrictions apply. For example:  Spell Checker  Tape Recorder  Alpha Smart Keyboard  Quicktionary Reading Pen

46 Supports available… Assistive technology: Note: availability varies at each campus; Note: availability varies at each campus; some restrictions apply.  Electronic texts requested from publishers  Audio books requested from RFB& D and audiobook players

47 Supports available… Assistive technology: Software Note : Availability varies at each campus; for use in Learning Center. S Note : Availability varies at each campus; for use in Learning Center. Some restrictions apply. For example:  Text to Voice: “Kurzweil Scanner”  Voice-to-text: “Dragon Naturally Speaking”  Enlarging & speaking: “Zoomtext”

48 Strategies for more efficient learning SAvailability varies depending on the CCSNH campus. Some restrictions apply. Academic Coaching to help a student learn how to: discover and use his/her learning style keep him/herself on track improve time management skills practice self-management skills

49 Strategies for more efficient learning Academic Coaching to help a student learn how to: prepare for tests organize course materials for success problem solve about courses and working with faculty balance school, work, family and personal responsibilities share successes !

50 Is it a good idea to use supports? Each student must decide…. It’s been our experience that the students who ACTIVELY use supports available are those students who DO ACHIEVE THEIR GOALS!

51 VI. Alternatives Advising Skill Building Interest Areas for Enrichment Community Participation

52 Alternatives Advising Options

53 If a student is qualified for a college program: Associate’s Degree Program –Full course load 12 or more credits –Reduced course load 6-11 credits

54 If a student is qualified for a college program, options for advising include: Taking only one course at a time –“Individual Course Enrollment” Same pre-requisites Same requirements and policies Space available basis

55 If a student is qualified for a college program, options for advising include: Auditing a course –Opportunity to learn more about the challenges of college work –Explore an area of interest –Refresh prior learning –Supplement existing knowledge Some restrictions apply No evaluation component Taken with permission

56 If a student is qualified for a college program, options for advising include: Certificate Programs For a concentration in a field without the general education requirements of a full Associate’s degree

57 Certificate Programs Note: Availability depends on the CCSNH campus; see catalogs or www.ccsnh.eduwww.ccsnh.edu For example: Landscape Design Early Childhood Community Social Services

58 Other Alternatives for Lifelong Learning Availability varies with each community.

59 Other Alternatives for Lifelong Learning Skill Building to Strengthen Academic Backgrounds Lifelong Learning: Interest Areas for Enrichment Community Participation and Community Service

60 ALTERNATIVES TO STRENGTHEN ACADEMIC BACKGROUNDS Division of Continuing Education Non- credit Workshops for skill development –Day, evening short-term workshops –example-Computer Proficiency Certificate

61 Summary Keys to Accessing Postsecondary Education A C E S

62 ACCESS to college A Accommodations are available through Disabilities Services to eligible students under the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

63 ACCESS to college C College curriculum and conduct code expectations are the same for all students, as listed in the course syllabus, program requirements and health, character and technical standards.

64 ACCESS to College C Choosing to actively learn new strategies and participate in supports such as academic coaching can make a difference in students’ achieving goals.

65 ACCESS to College E Equal opportunity to pursue programs is afforded to qualified students.

66 ACCESS to college S Strategies for studying, self-management and self-advocacy skills are keys to success!

67 ACCESS to College S “Success means doing the best we can with what we have. Success is in the doing, not the getting--- in the trying, not the triumph.” - Wynn Davis

68 Keys to Accessing Postsecondary Education Prepared by Beverly W. Boggess, Ph.D. Coordinator of Disabilities Services, NHTI- Concord’s Community College bboggess@ccsnh.edu

69 Thank you

70 For more information refer to www.ccsnh.edu www.ccsnh.edu


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