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Annual Staff Recertification Rev 2010 Annual Staff Recertification Rev 2010 TACT -2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques.

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Presentation on theme: "Annual Staff Recertification Rev 2010 Annual Staff Recertification Rev 2010 TACT -2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques."— Presentation transcript:

1 Annual Staff Recertification Rev 2010 Annual Staff Recertification Rev 2010 TACT -2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

2 What would you do? 1. John lives in a foster home. Today is his birthday, and he hasn’t yet heard from his mother. He is normally pretty easy-going, but seems pretty agitated as he comes in from school. When you ask him how his day went, John says angrily: “How do you THINK it went? Why don’t you people just get a life!”

3 What would you do? 2. Henry bounces into your classroom, excited about the perfect point sheet he’s got going. He doesn’t settle down when the class begins, and continues telling his classmates about the prizes he’s going to win, interrupting your lesson.

4 3. Susan and Nicole live in a residential treatment center. As you walk by Susan’s room, you see her talking with Nicole, who is backed into a corner. Before you can say a thing, Susan swings her fist into Nicole’s stomach, then grabs her by the hair, about to punch her again. What would you do?

5 Immediately Dangerous? CORRECTION 1.Reminder 2.Warning 3.Confrontation Not Immediately Dangerous? COUNSELING 1.Give space 2.Active Listening 3.Problem Solving TACT-2 MODEL DeliberateEmotional Crisis Response 1. Redirect2. Remove3. Restrict4. Restrain

6 Peers Outside Issues Expression Behavior Deliberate Emotional Approval None Calm Usual Disapproval Significant Intense Unusual

7 Understanding Deliberate Problems TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

8 What is Deliberate Misbehavior? “Purposeful attempt to meet one’s own needs at the expense of others.” TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

9 Understanding Deliberate Problems TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques Dr. William Glasser ’ s model of social needs suggests that deliberate behavior is FUNCTIONAL. Negative behavior can meet students ’ short-term social needs, though often at the expense of others ’ rights or even the students own long-term best interests.

10 Glasser’s Social Needs Love Belonging Power Importance Freedom Choice Fun Pleasure

11 Negative Needs Fulfilling Behaviors Belonging Class clown, neediness, giving into peer pressure Importance Defying authority, breaking rules, intimidating others Fun Teasing others, vandalism, thrill seeking activities Freedom Refusal to work, running away, using drugs or alcohol

12 Deliberate example: Susan, the group intimidator, walks into the dorm and immediately calls out to Nicole across the room. “Hey b----. Don’t forget to do my homework tonight. I don’t want to miss out on that trip tomorrow!” When Nicole protests, Susan steps close and twists her hair in a fist. When staff intervene, Susan backs off but looks threateningly at Nicole. Which cues of deliberate behavior are seen here? Which social needs are met by Susan’s behavior?

13 Understanding Emotional Crisis TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

14 What is Emotional Crisis? “Impulsive reaction to overwhelming stress or misperceptions.” TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

15 Understanding Emotional Problems TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques Dr. Nicholas Long ’ s Conflict Cycle suggests that emotional crisis is often driven by low self-esteem, misperceptions, and/or unusual stress. Students become overwhelmed by their emotions and act impulsively, leading staff to engage them in power struggles.

16 Irrational Beliefs Low Self-Esteem Irrational Beliefs Low Self-Esteem Stressful Problem Thoughts Feelings Impulsive Behavior Conflict Cycle Based on a model created by Nicholas Long, Ph.D. Negative Consequences

17 Nicole’s Issues Nicole was sexually abused by her stepfather for many years before he finally left, some-thing her mother has never forgiven her for. What might Nicole believe about herself? Imagine that Nicole is loudly criticized by staff for forgetting to make her bed. This triggers her memories of abuse and.... What feelings might she have? What impulsive behavior might result? What negative consequences might be next?

18 Emotional example: Later that evening, Nicole is anxiously working on Susan’s homework when Ms. Selma calls for lights out. “I have to finish this!” Nicole insists, biting her lip and bouncing her foot up and down. “If I don’t I’ll get in trouble tomorrow!” Which cues of emotional crisis are seen here? What emotions might Nicole be experiencing? “You should have planned your time better, Nicole,” Ms. Selma responds, not realizing the situation with Susan. Though she is normally cooperative, Nicole begins to escalate as Ms. Selma insists she follow the rules and turn the lights out NOW.

19 Skills for Handling Emotional Crisis TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

20 Handling Emotional Crisis TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques Emotional problems call for counseling responses. Our goal is to de-escalate the youth and help him/her to learn better coping strategies, rather than dealing with the immediate behavior. Depending on the intensity, we might: (1) Give Space, (2) Actively Listen, or (3) Problem Solve

21 Tasks During Crisis 1. Warning 2. Escalation 3. Crisis 4. Resolution PREVENT DE-ESCALATE Promote LEARNING SAFETY

22 Problem Solving Active Listening Give Space 4. Resolution Phase 1. Warning Phase 2. Escalation Phase TensionTension

23 Giving Space 1. PHYSICALLY SAFE, but 2. TOO UPSET to talk rationally. Give time and space when a youth is: Use a calm tone and non-threatening body language. Acknowledge feelings, offer time to calm down, and set limits while monitoring the youth.

24 Giving Space example: Since Nicole looks about ready to explode, you decide to give her a moment to calm down before trying to figure out what’s going on. What could you say to acknowledge Nicole’s feelings and give her space? “Nicole, I can see how worked you are about this. Why don’t you take a minute to yourself in your room. I’ll visit with you when I’ve checked on the other girls.”

25 Active Listening 1. CALM ENOUGH to talk, but 2. TOO UPSET to problem solve. Use active listening when a resident is: First, be attentive and encourage the youth to vent. Do not take sides, or engage in premature problem solving. Instead, reflect or paraphrase the youth’s feelings and reasons. Ask non-threatening, open-ended questions to get more information.

26 Active Listening example: After calming down in her room, Nicole begins talking: “Why couldn’t you just let me finish my work? All I needed was another 10 minutes. Now I’m going to get in big trouble with Susan and it’s going to be YOUR FAULT!” REFLECTION: “It sounds like you’re really upset about not finishing your work.” PROBE: “I’m curious: Why would SUSAN care about YOUR homework? What else is going on?”

27 Problem Solving 1. CALM ENOUGH to talk, and 2. READY to problem solve. Use Therapeutic Problem Solving when a youth is: Begin with the “therapeutic” steps by using active listening skills to explore the youth’s side of what happened. LISTEN, EMPATHIZE and SUMMARIZE their point of view. Then move into “problem solving” steps by helping the youth see other options and resolve the situation. SUGGEST new perspectives, explore OPTIONS, then create a NEW PLAN.

28 Skills for Managing Deliberate Problems TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

29 Handling Deliberate Misbehavior TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques Deliberate misbehaviors call for behavioral responses. Our goal is simply to change the immediate behavior. Depending on the seriousness of the issue, we might use a: (1) Friendly Reminder, (2) Fair Warning, or (3) Firm Confrontation

30 RemindersReminders Use “Friendly Reminders” to verbally or non-verbally recall a rule or expectation without putting youth on the spot.

31 Friendly Reminder What are some VERBAL or NON-VERBAL reminders you could use to redirect her? The day after the homework incident, Susan is sitting in the kitchen of the group home laughing with her friends. It is her chore to peel carrots for dinner, and she hasn’t begun yet.

32 WarningsWarnings Use “Fair Warnings” to privately caution about impending consequences. 1.Ask to Talk 2.Clear “If/Then” statement 3.Repeat Request

33 Three Types of Consequences a. NATURAL CONSEQUENCES b. LOGICAL CONSEQUENCES c. PUNITIVE CONSEQUENCES Tom stays up past his bedtime playing video games: √ Natural Consequences of this behavior? √ Logical Consequences of this behavior? √ Punitive Consequences of this behavior?

34 Fair Warning Five minutes later, Susan still hasn’t begun her chores. You offer her another reminder and she says: “Nicole said she’d do it for me tonight since I did a favor for her last night.” House rules state that everyone must do their own chores or go to bed 1 hour early. What WARNING could you give Susan? “Let me see you for a second Susan. If you want to avoid an early bedtime, then you have to do you OWN chores, and you know it. Now please get started.”

35 Confrontatio n Use “Firm Confrontations” to directly address a serious problem behavior in a calm, professional manner.

36 Firm Confrontation You walk away for a minute, then return to the kitchen, where you see Nicole peeling the carrots you asked Susan to peel. Susan is still sitting nearby, talking with her friends. When she sees you she says, “I tried to tell her, but she INSISTED!” You ask Nicole and the other girls to leave the kitchen and prepare for a private confrontation. Write a FIRM CONFRONTATION. 1.Misbehavior: “Susan, I asked you several times to do your own chore tonight, and you’ve ignored me.” 2. Effects: “It’s clear that you’re taking advantage of Nicole, and that’s just plain wrong.” 3. Consequences: “I want you to finish YOUR chore while I’m here… and you’ll have a early bedtime tonight, just like I warned you about.”

37 Recognizing Adult Anger Traps TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

38 ADULT ANGER TRAP #1 OUTSIDE STRESS Leftover stress from other home or work problems… makes it easy to overreact angrily to a minor situation.

39 ADULT ANGER TRAP #2 EMBARRASSMENT We feel helpless or inadequate trying to manage a challenging situation… then turn embarrassment to anger.

40 ADULT ANGER TRAP #3 FEAR We feel a natural shock or fear in response to a threatening situation… then turn anxiety into anger.

41 ADULT ANGER TRAP #4 VALUES VIOLATION A core value is violated by a resident’s behavior, sparking feelings of righteous anger. VALUES VIOLATION

42 ADULT ANGER TRAP #5 AUTHORITY CHALLENGE We engage in an angry power struggle to establish dominance over a defiant resident.

43 Anger Trap example Ms. Selma walked in just as Susan was shoving Nicole into a wall. Susan grabbed Nicole’s chest and pinched HARD, causing the smaller girl to bend over and cry out in pain. “You better shut up!” Susan whispered intensely, not seeing Ms. Selma as she approached from behind. “ To be honest, I didn ’ t even think about it. I ’ d already been having a bad day, and this was just the last straw. I just grabbed Susan and flung her across the I HATE bullies! ” What Anger Traps did this staff fall into?

44 25-item multiple choice test Prepare for TACT-2

45 Immediately Dangerous? CORRECTION 1.Reminder 2.Warning 3.Confrontation Not Immediately Dangerous? COUNSELING 1.Give space 2.Active Listening 3.Problem Solving TACT-2 MODEL DeliberateEmotional Crisis Response 1. Redirect2. Remove3. Restrict4. Restrain


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