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Professor Samantha Twiselton Director of Sheffield Institute of Education Professor Samantha Twiselton Founding Director of Sheffield Institute of Education.

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Presentation on theme: "Professor Samantha Twiselton Director of Sheffield Institute of Education Professor Samantha Twiselton Founding Director of Sheffield Institute of Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 Professor Samantha Twiselton Director of Sheffield Institute of Education Professor Samantha Twiselton Founding Director of Sheffield Institute of Education

2 How does expertise develop? How can we support/accelerate this? What gets in the way? Student Teachers at different points in their programmes – observed moment by moment in the classroom: What are they trying to achieve through what they do and say? What knowledge do they draw on? What strategies do they use? What do they think they need in order to be more effective in achieving their goal? How does this link to becoming an expert teacher? How does this link to an effective curriculum? How does this mean schools and universities should work together?

3 Three types of teacher - or three points on a sliding scale: Task Manager Curriculum Deliverer Concept/skill Builder

4 I wanted them to get the sheet filled in I wanted them to get the sheet filled in Really I was just concentrating on getting it done. Really I was just concentrating on getting it done. My role was organisation - make sure they went in turns - went clockwise. My role was organisation - make sure they went in turns - went clockwise. I didn’t want them to start being silly, that was really the main thing I was thinking about I didn’t want them to start being silly, that was really the main thing I was thinking about Classrooms should look busy. Classrooms should look orderly. Children should complete their tasks. Teachers should be in control. TASK MANAGERS

5 Learning is prescribed. Learning is dictated by someone else. The curriculum is a goal in itself. It is hard to give a reason why the learning is important. CURRICULUM DELIVERERS It was in the scheme… that was what was next. It was in the scheme… that was what was next. The book said to do it that way. The book said to do it that way. To be honest I don’t know why - it was just what I was told to do – it’s what they always do To be honest I don’t know why - it was just what I was told to do – it’s what they always do I was bothered about getting though the plan I was bothered about getting though the plan

6 CONCEPT/SKILL BUILDERS I knew they had to really get it - to understand … before they could use it properly I knew they had to really get it - to understand … before they could use it properly I wanted to show them in different ways - help them see what it was all about. I wanted to show them in different ways - help them see what it was all about. Focused on the subject and why it matters. The concepts and skills are key. Tasks only a vehicle for learning. The main goal lies beyond the lesson - transferable and transformative learning. I wanted them to be able to use it in their writing – to bring it to life I wanted them to be able to use it in their writing – to bring it to life being flexible in the discussion so I haven’t like got a set of questions that … like a script – so I wanted to be flexible … respond … go with the flow

7 Task Manager Curriculum Deliverer Concept/skill Builder Task Manager Near beginning of ITE Informed by experience as pupil Likely to revert Curriculum Deliverer Next Stage of Development Can stick in this category Prescribed curricula very dominant factor A continuum or a cycle? A vicious circle? Traps and ways of thinking/being/behaving to try and avoid Concept/skill builder Towards the end of ITE Need access to multiple contested perspectives Need iterative experiences /dialogue

8 Major curriculum change in England – implementation of 'National Strategies' - very detailed in content and method Too much prescription and too much detail made most teachers into Curriculum Deliverers ‘There’s no time to think – it’s like a steam roller!’ Communities of Practice - acculturation (Lave and Wenger) Learned dispositions for action (Bourdieu). Routinisation’ (Eraut) Tasks and routines become ends in themselves. Too much ‘stuff’ crowds out ability to see the wood for the trees. Twiselton,

9 More likely to be/stay a Task Manager or Curriculum Deliverer if: Very crowded and prescriptive curriculum - stops asking 'why'? Very busy school environments with no built in developmental programme or time for reflection = unreflective culture/unarticulated pedagogy - no time for debate ‘Routinisation’ (Eraut) THE IMPACT OF CONTEXT AND CULTURE More likely to become/remain a Concept/Skill Builder if: Contexts conducive to articulation and Able to compare/contrast/critique approaches

10 Effective teaching Critical reflection Conceptual framework Effective curriculum

11 Oct 2009

12 THE PRIMARY NATIONAL CURRICULUM: THE REMIT help schools design engaging, challenging and inspiring learning experiences to meet their pupils’ individual needs and strengths - put personal development at the heart of the curriculum reflect what we know about how children learn - reflect the distinctive features of the primary phase

13 The primary curriculum consultation and evidence base 1057 survey responses 9 conferences attended by 750 educationalists 49 focus groups and seminars for 800 participants Pupil consultation – 507 responses Parent consultation – 375 responses Hundreds of s, letters, speaking engagements, school visits… 0-14 advisory group: including system leaders, Primary Heads International comparison studies and probes Subject expert group Co-development Evidence from Ofsted Literature review Commissioned research and probes Universities and academics Policy steer: Personal development, ICT, flexibility

14 Good Curriculum Leaders see the big picture and talk about it make learning deep and profound resist institutional habits stretch it to fit the child

15 Levels of Specification (Mick Waters) High Low Design Content coherencefragmentation stagnationregimentation

16 Highest Curriculum Factor Design linked to development Content is kept low but major focus on relevance Real audience and purpose Engaging and inclusive Pupils as ‘drivers’ Community links

17 Lowest Curriculum Denominator Getting through the day Restrictive and stifling, or random and unrewarding Pupils as ‘passengers’ Learning in segments We always did it like this Task Management and Curriculum Delivery

18 Conclusions Effective learning needs learning experiences to be designed to be purposeful, developmental and relevant Effective/expert teaching utilises a range of knowledge, applied through the use of higher order teaching strategies Learning organisations are most effective when the points above come together - effective teaching involves being a member of a critically reflective community of practice that is constantly relating practice to the bigger picture at every level Hence - Sheffield Institute of Education's approach to partnership working and whole school development...


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