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Mitigating Cheating A Cliff’s Notes version. What is cheating? The expectations change Faculty vs. Students vs. administration.

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Presentation on theme: "Mitigating Cheating A Cliff’s Notes version. What is cheating? The expectations change Faculty vs. Students vs. administration."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mitigating Cheating A Cliff’s Notes version

2 What is cheating? The expectations change Faculty vs. Students vs. administration

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4 “Stealing a glance at a test, a little bit of plagiarism – it’s just not on people’s radar screens anymore.” - Donald L. McCabe Duke University Center of Academic Integrity

5 Conventional vs. Digital TypeConventionalDigital Copied homework84.5%40.2% Unpermitted collaboration81.4%49.5% Plagiarized a few sentences46.6%60.4% Plagiarized a complete paper20.2%13.6% Used unpermitted notes during an exam 44.5%27.2% Coped from someone else during an exam 60.5%23.5%

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7 UVU TurnItIn statistics – 8% of submission scored above 50% – 16% scored above 25% – 10% scored above 50% – 23% scored above 25% – 7% scored above 50% – 21% scored above 25%

8 Why cheating? A number of reasons

9 Performance

10 Napster effect

11 Class a hoop

12 Get away with it

13 Culture

14 Who is to blame?

15 Students

16 Teachers

17 “ – unreasonable assignments, the poor quality of teaching, and unclear instructions on major assignments were mentioned frequently by students.”

18 “I have witnessed cheating on several occasions and even reported it to the professors. On one occasion I was told no action was going to be taken against them since they were doing a poor job of cheating”

19 “Faculty need to be more active in monitoring academic dishonesty as well as punishing those students that participate in it. Facutly often turn their heads or “Punish” on their own terms rather than follow university policy.”

20 The institution

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23 Course design strategies

24 Avoid war on cheating

25 “…students at schools with high levels of self- reported cheating often discuss the issue of academic dishonesty in terms of a ‘we’ versus ‘they’ mentality. Cheat by us (students) is acceptable because they (faculty and/or administrators) ‘deserve’ it for any number of reasons” (McCabe and Trevino, 1993)

26 Process documents Reflections Drafts (Annotated bibliography, thesis statement, etc.) Multiple assessments Oral reports (process questions) Courtesy of TurnItIn.com

27 High-Stakes Assessments

28 Make connections Why are students doing this assessment?

29 “Students are also taught that collaboration is a critical business skill that is valued in corporations. Yet, students are often required to complete assignments by themselves with no outside assistance.” (McCabe, Butterfield, and Trevino, 2006)

30 Statement Usually placed in syllabus. Good idea to have it in Canvas if you are using it. Consult with department if unsure about language. Custom TurnItIn statement

31 F2F Strategies Proper seat spacing. Seat randomization. A/B quizzes Cell phone policy Random walkthroughs

32 Other ideas?

33 Strategies for Canvas Files Quizzes


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