Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

At a loss for words? 214 Evans Library | 205 West Campus Library writingcenter.tamu.edu | 979-458-1455 1.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "At a loss for words? 214 Evans Library | 205 West Campus Library writingcenter.tamu.edu | 979-458-1455 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 At a loss for words? 214 Evans Library | 205 West Campus Library writingcenter.tamu.edu |

2 Grammar & Punctuation for Writers 2

3 { } Agreement of Subject & Verbs Make the subject and verb agree with each other and not with the words that come between them. 3 One of the most famous Aggies is reviewing the march-in. Of my friends, several have vowed never to leave Aggieland.

4 Subject & Verb Agreement 4 Verb SubjectExample Singular Two, sing.Harry or Ron is arriving by floo subjects powder today. Singular Each Each of the professors knows how to teach potions. Plural Either/orNeither the History of Magic Neither/norbook nor the wands are sold at the Leaky Cauldron. Singular Sums ofOne hundred galleons is too moneymuch for a baby dragon.

5 { } Make the nouns and the pronouns that refer to it agree. 5 Agreement of Nouns & Pronouns Every Aggie has promised to uphold his or her part of the bargain. All Aggies have promised to uphold their part of the bargain.

6 Noun & Pronoun Agreement NounPronoun Example Singular Singular Everyone is bringing his or her wand to class. Singular Singular Each of the professors knows his or her most adept fliers. Singular Singular The class has its own dragon. Plural Plural The class has their own dragon. 6

7 { Dangling Modifiers An introductory modifier should always refer to the subject of the sentence. 7 After carrying the mini-fridge up the dorm stairs, it wouldn’t fit in the doorway to the room. After carrying the mini-fridge up the dorm stairs, the Fish found that it wouldn’t fit in the doorway to the room.

8 { Parallelism We learned Aggie yells, the “Aggie War Hymn,” talked about the traditions, and made new friends. We had fun learning the Aggie yells, singing the “Aggie War Hymn,” talking about the traditions, and making new friends. 8 In a series, always use the same type of grammatical structure for elements throughout the list. Make them parallel.

9 { } Active Voice If the subject of the sentence performs the action, the verb is in active voice. The Aggie men’s basketball team beat Colorado’s basketball team this week. *When the actor is more important than the action, use active voice. 9

10 { } Passive Voice If the subject of the sentence receives the action, the verb is in passive voice. The tu women’s basketball team was beaten by the Aggies this week. *When the actor is unknown or unimportant or you want to hide the actor, use passive voice. 10

11 Punctuation Check for... Commas Semicolons Colons Apostrophes 11

12 { } Understanding Clauses Independent clause Can stand on its own as a sentence Receives the most emphasis Dependent clause Is a sentence fragment Adds extra information 12 Because Aggies believe in honesty and loyalty, they do not lie, cheat or steal.

13 Dependent Clause Indicators A clause will be dependent if it starts with words like because, if, when, while, since, that, which, who, as, or a preposition. 13 *Prepositions are anything an Aggie can do at Kyle Field. Since I go to Texas A&M, I follow the Aggie Honor Code. { }

14 Comma Splice Error Joining complete sentences (independent clauses) with a comma 14 Aggies do not lie, cheat or steal, they believe in honesty and loyalty. Aggies believe in honesty and loyalty, therefore, they do not lie, cheat or steal.

15 Run-on Error 15 Aggies do not lie, cheat or steal they believe in honesty and loyalty. Aggies believe in honesty and loyalty therefore, they do not lie, cheat or steal. Joining complete sentences (independent clauses) with no punctuation { }

16 To Correct These Errors... 1.Comma + coordinating conjunction 16 Aggies do not lie, cheat or steal, for they believe in honesty and loyalty. Aggies believe in honesty and loyalty, so they do not lie, cheat or steal. {,} *What’s a coordinating conjunction? [for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so—FANBOYS]

17 To Correct These Errors Period 17 Aggies do not lie, cheat or steal. They believe in honesty and loyalty. Aggies do not lie, cheat or steal. For they believe in honesty and loyalty. {.}

18 To Correct These Errors Semicolon Aggies do not lie, cheat or steal; they believe in honesty and loyalty. Aggies believe in honesty and loyalty; therefore, they do not lie, cheat or steal. {;}

19 Transitions with Semicolons Aggies do not lie, cheat or steal; however, nobody’s perfect. Aggies do not lie, cheat or steal; thus, they have an Honor Code. 19 Words like however, therefore, in addition, nevertheless, whereas, and thus can be used with semicolons to make transitions. {;}

20 Semicolons & Colons Semicolons Set apart a complete sentence from an example or list He checked out three books: Jurassic Park, Timeline, and Airframe. Separate two complete sentences (second sentence NOT capitalized) Used in lists where there are two commas within the items of the list Colons {;} {:} 20

21 { } Use Coordination for Balance Coordinate sentences to have balanced parts that are given equal emphasis. Two sentences joined by a semi-colon Two sentences joined by a comma plus a coordinate conjunction (FANBOYS) 21 Aggies do not lie, cheat or steal; they believe in honesty and loyalty.

22 Subordinate Ideas with Commas The emphasis goes to the complete sentence or independent clause. 22 Because Aggies believe in honesty and loyalty, they do not lie, cheat or steal. Because they do not lie, cheat or steal, Aggies believe in honesty and loyalty. {,}

23 If the phrase or clause is essential to the sentence’s meaning, do not use commas. Commas & Who, Which, That 23 The Aggie wearing the Maroon Out shirt is my brother. The Aggie who is wearing the Maroon Out shirt is my brother. {,}

24 If the word, phrase, or clause is not essential for your sentence to make the sense you want, use commas. Commas & Who, Which, That 24 {,} The Aggie, wearing the Maroon Out shirt, is my brother. The Aggie, who is wearing the Maroon Out shirt, is my brother.

25 Commas & Introductory Elements 25 When using an introductory word, phrase, or dependent clause to begin a sentence, use a comma. During the last thirteen football seasons, I have seen every Aggie home game. However, I have seen every Aggie home game. {,}

26 UWC Jeopardy Grammar and Punctuation The court rules Name that blooper! The pause that refreshes The pen is mightier than the rule Potpourri BankEnd 26

27 The court rules for 100 Two complete sentences (punctuated as one) with no punctuation between them. 

28 The court rules for 200 Two or more complete sentences not started with “and, or, for, but, yet, so” and joined with a comma. 

29 The court rules for 300 One subject, one verb (predicate), and it stands alone. 

30 The court rules for 400 “Between you and I” 

31 The court rules for 500 One independent clause + one dependent clause. 

32 Name that blooper! for 100 Marie Antoinette said, “Let them eat cake”! 

33 Name that blooper! for 200 Warm and plump, Mary Beth inhaled the long-awaited hot dog. 

34 Name that blooper! for 300 My parents bought a house from a man with no inside plumbing. 

35 Name that blooper! for 400 Either are correct. 

36 Name that blooper! for 500 The perfect Martini uses equal parts dry and sweet Vermouth, having no more than one ounce of water or ice, and is always made with gin instead of vodka. 

37 Pause that refreshes for 100 The punctuation mark used to separate items in a series. 

38 Pause that refreshes for 200 The punctuation mark that separates two complete sentences and that is not a period, dash, or colon. 

39 Pause that refreshes for 300 It can be used to introduce a long list. 

40 Pause that refreshes for 400 One of three ways to fix a run-on sentence. 

41 Pause that refreshes for 500 A punctuation mark that is often substituted for the colon or comma and is considered less formal. 

42 The pen is mightier for 100 Sometimes you have to make exceptions. No kidding. 

43 The pen is mightier for 200 The policemen, firemen, and mailmen had gathered to honor fallen heroes. 

44 The pen is mightier for 300 Who did you call last night? 

45 The pen is mightier for 400 It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness. 

46 The pen is mightier for 500 To boldly go where no one has gone before. 

47 Potpourri for 100 Michael Crichton combines scientifical information with enthralling literature in his books. 

48 Potpourri for 200 Simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex 

49 Potpourri for 300 In spite of its name, it won’t catch spelling errors like “there” for “their.” 

50 Potpourri for 400 Is Bob dead, did something break? 

51 Potpourri for 500 If we cooperate together, we can fulfill the necessary requirements. 

52 The court rules 1.Run on 2.Comma splice 3.Sentence 4.Incorrect case (objective after preposition) 5.Complex sentence  Name that blooper! 1.Exclamation point goes inside quote (part of quoted material) 2.Dangling modifier 3.Misplaced modifier 4.Subject-verb disagreement 5.List not in parallel structure The pause that refreshes The pen is mightier than the rule 1.Comma 2.Semi-colon (;) 3.Colon (:) 4.Period, semi-colon, comma with coordinating conjunction 5.Dash 1.Rhetorically effective fragment 2.Discriminatory language 3.Acceptable use of who; less formal than whom 4.Parallel structure 5.Acceptable split infinitive Potpourri 1.A word that is not a word 2.Types of sentences 3.Spell-check 4.Comma splice 5.Wordy sentence 52

53 For More Help… Visit our website or call us to schedule an appointment. We can help you find answers to any of your grammar and punctuation questions! 53

54 214 Evans Library | 205 West Campus Library writingcenter.tamu.edu | We’ll help you find the write words. U N I V E R S I T Y J X I G Z P O E N H B W D E T L Q I L R D R C K K K P P T R T I V R M X S T X J P T B C Z P B Y O U C I S K E W V J D A E N S I N N Q O G P E G I C J C T O B Y P X E G K G V E F G B S R M C E V Q R M Check us out on… 54


Download ppt "At a loss for words? 214 Evans Library | 205 West Campus Library writingcenter.tamu.edu | 979-458-1455 1."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google