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1 ASSESSMENT AND PLAGIARISM AT RMIT A Briefing prepared by the Assessment Working Party RMIT University, Office of the Academic Registrar, 2003.

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Presentation on theme: "1 ASSESSMENT AND PLAGIARISM AT RMIT A Briefing prepared by the Assessment Working Party RMIT University, Office of the Academic Registrar, 2003."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 ASSESSMENT AND PLAGIARISM AT RMIT A Briefing prepared by the Assessment Working Party RMIT University, Office of the Academic Registrar, 2003

2 2 Academic Standards The reputation of your award within the community, industry and the professions - whether it’s a degree, diploma or certificate - depends on the quality and originality of the work that you submit. You are required to uphold the academic standards of the university and the quality of your degree. The RMIT Assessment Charter shows how you can do this.

3 3 RMIT Assessment Charter outlines the responsibilities of staff and students in relation to assessment can be found on the “Assessment and Plagiarism” website

4 4 What is Plagiarism? – the RMIT Definition The presentation of the work, idea or creation of another person as though it is your own. It is a form of cheating and is a very serious academic offence which may lead to expulsion from the University. Plagiarised material can be drawn from, and presented in written, graphic and visual form, including electronic data, and oral presentations. Plagiarism occurs when the origin of the material used is not appropriately cited.

5 5 The Australian context As in many countries, in Australia we value the work and words of a master or expert in a field. However, you must always acknowledge the source of the words or works which you copy or summarise. This acknowledgement must be done according to RMIT referencing guidelines. Failure to do this will lead to charges of plagiarism.

6 6 The Australian context - 2 We value your original work and ideas because we want you to  become independent thinkers  able to critically analyse information and ideas or create original designs, images, code, etc. Using a referencing system helps us to differentiate between your ideas and words and those of other people’s.

7 7 Why is Plagiarism Wrong? It is a form of fraud - you are stealing someone else’s work and ideas. It may be a breach of Copyright Law. You are denying yourself a valuable learning experience. It devalues the original work of other students. It goes against the university principle of graduating independent thinkers.

8 8 Your responsibilities You must: follow assessment rules and/or guidelines submit original work for assessment do the work yourself (unless it is a group assessment) not copy other people’s work not help others to plagiarise or cheat not provide false data

9 9 Your responsibilities - 2 acknowledge quotes and sources keep a copy of your assessments, (and related assignments, working papers, notes and drafts) for the duration of your program. keep them in a secure place so that others cannot access and copy them

10 10 Acknowledging your Sources: Citation and Referencing Systems There are several different systems. Some disciplines have a preferred system. The system used in this program/course is [to be supplied] You can find out about this system from [handout, the Library, essay-writing guide, etc. – to be supplied]

11 11 Plagiarism Detection Plagiarism detection software may be used on your assignments

12 12 Possible Penalties for Plagiarism Assessment failure Course failure Cancelled results Up to 12 months’ suspension Expulsion Whatever the penalty, it’s recorded in your student file and on the University plagiarism database

13 13 Plagiarism Prevention - 1 The Assessment and Plagiarism website page lists RMIT services and online resources where you can get help and guidance, e.g.  Library online tutorials and guides  RMIT101 unit on Citation and Referencing  Learning Skills Unit [Add local sources if available]

14 14 Plagiarism Prevention – 2 If you feel pressured by –Workloads –Clashing deadlines –Other people who want you to cheat/plagiarise or help them to cheat/plagiarise you can seek help from: –Your Program coordinator –An academic or international student adviser –The RMIT Counselling Service –Student Rights Officers

15 15 Plagiarism Prevention - 3 Plagiarism websites often contain resources which can help you acquire the skills to avoid plagiarism. Here is one example of the right and wrong way of acknowledging someone else’s words. It is from the Indiana University website on Plagiarism.

16 16 An Example: Original Text Technology has significantly transformed education at several major turning points in history. In the broadest sense, the first technology was the primitive modes of communication used by prehistoric people before the development of spoken language. Mime, gestures, grunts, and drawing of figures in the sand with a stick were methods used to communicate – yes, even to educate. Even without speech, these prehistoric people were able to teach their young how to catch animals for food, what animals to avoid,. Which vegetation was good to eat and which was poisonous. Source: Frick, T. (1991). Restructuring education through technology. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.

17 17 Plagiarised Version In examining technology, we have to remember that computers are not the first technology people have had to deal with. The first technology was the primitive mode of communication used by prehistoric people before the development of spoken language. Explanation: This example of student written work is plagiarised. The student copied, word-for-word, text from the original source material. No credit was given to the author of the text and quotation marks were not used. Also, the student didn’t provide a reference.

18 18 Correct Version In examining technology, we have to remember that computers are not the first technology people have had to deal with. Frick (1991) believes that “…the first technology was the primitive nodes of communication used by prehistoric people before the development of spoken language” (p. 10). Explanation: Note in this example that the passage begins with the author and year of the publication. Quotation marks are used to indicate that this passage is a word- for-word citation from the original document.


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