Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 Grade 4 Teacher Directions Hillsboro Elementary Interim Assessment Interim Assessment Reading Informational Text Interim Assessment Reading Informational.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 Grade 4 Teacher Directions Hillsboro Elementary Interim Assessment Interim Assessment Reading Informational Text Interim Assessment Reading Informational."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Grade 4 Teacher Directions Hillsboro Elementary Interim Assessment Interim Assessment Reading Informational Text Interim Assessment Reading Informational Text

2 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 2 Interim Assessment Awesome Team Members, Writers and Editors! AllenBlake AlvaradoDeborah ChristensenHaley ChronisterNicole CrowellLindsay DanielsVicki DarnallMonica DelplancheDeborah DowDiane DuranLiana EllisCarrie FisherSheri GarciaLindsay GerigStephanie GiardHeather GodfreyBrooke GoldmannChristine HancockMelissa IncrovatoJamie JayGinger JohnsonJenn KagawaKo KinsmanLaycee LawsKimberly LeonardKelly LuleBerta LuleAlfonso MainesSandra McLainGina MunsonShawna OrozcoChristina PortingaTeresa RamerJudy ReamerErin RetzlaffSara RiderJami RookeKelly RussoJill SaxtonBrent SchoebelTrina SellLeslie ShepherdErin StinsonJanet ThoenNikki TovarArcema VanDykeErin WaltersChristy WedelMandy WintersMelanie ZagyvaAlia

3 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 3 Important Information A.This booklet is divided into two parts… 1.Teacher’s Resources and Answer Keys a.Pages 1 – 9 2.Student Assessment (can be printed in a small booklet form) b.Pages 10 – 25 B.This is the HSD Elementary Interim Assessment. This material is intended for assessing reading informational standards 1,2,3,5,6 and 7 taught in the first school semester. Printing Instructions… The interim assessment should be ordered through the HSD Print Shop. Be sure you order the section: Teachers Directions Be sure you order one copy of the student assessment for each of your students.

4 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 4 Reporting Categories Please enter student scores into Synergy in the 4 reporting categories listed below. Selected response items are one point each. Constructed response items are up to 3 points each. There are 5 possible points for each of the four reporting categories for a total of 20 points in grade four. 4 Reporting Categories Target 8 KEY DETAILS: Standards 1 and 3 Target 9 CENTRAL IDEAS: Standard 2 Target 11 REASONING - EVIDENCE: Standard 6 Target 13 STRUCTURES- FEATURES: Standards 5 and 7 SR Questions 5 Pts. Questions: 9, 10, 11, 15, 16 5 Pts. Questions: 2, 4, 12, 13, 14 2 Pts. Questions: 3, 5 2 Pts. Questions: 1, 6 CR Questions 3 Pts. Question: 7 3 Pts. Question: 8 Important Scoring Information Directions for Interim Assessment The HSD Elementary Interim Assessment is required. Please enter the student scores into Synergy. Grades K – 2 Students in kindergarten should have the passages read to them as a listening comprehension assessment. Students in grades 1 – 2 should read the passages independently if they can, however; students not reading at grade level may have the passages read to them. Grades 3 – 6 Students in grades 3 – 6 should read the passages independently unless an IEP signifies otherwise. Synergy: When students have finished the entire assessment enter the total number of correct points for each of the four reporting categories. There is a possibility of 5 total points for each reporting category. Selected Responses: 0-1 Point Each Constructed Responses: 0 – 3 Points each

5 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 5 Interim Gr. 4 Selected Response (SR) Questions point (CR) - 3 Pts. Reporting Categories Key Details Main Idea Reason Structure Student Question # CR168 CR Qu.# Class Total Optional Classroom Use : You may use this class scoring sheet if you wish.

6 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 6 SBAC Reading Assessment Constructed Response General Template Short Constructed Response Short constructed response sample questions are designed to assess CCLS reading standards. These are single questions that ask students to respond to a prompt or question by stating their answer and providing textual evidence to support their answer. The goal of the short response questions is to require students to show succinctly their ability to comprehend text. In responding to these questions, students will be expected to write in complete sentences.

7 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 7 7. After reading the information from both the first and second-hand accounts, what can you say about what it takes to be a successful pilot like Amelia Earhart? Use examples from both passages to support your answer. (RI.4.6) Scoring [Notes} “Teacher Language” Student gives essential elements of a complete interpretation: Essential elements for a complete interpretation: student provides examples from both passages in order to answer the prompt “what it takes to be a successful pilot.” Aspects of the Task/Evidence: The student will give 3 – 4 character traits about Amelia Earhart with supporting evidence for each trait from both the first and second-hand accounts. There are many combinations of examples that could be used and all are acceptable if the examples are supported explicitly in the text and both texts are represented. focused and organized, consistently addressing: The student needs to be focused on Amelia’s character traits as a pilot and the details that support this. Constructed Response Interim Assessment Answer Key Standard RI.4.6 Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

8 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 8 8. According to the passage Amelia Earhart how did Amelia’s flight goals change as time went on? Use details from the map to support your answer. (RI.4.7) Scoring [Notes} “Teacher Language” Student gives essential elements of a complete interpretation: Essential elements for a complete interpretation: student provides examples from both the text and the map in order to answer the prompt; “how did Amelia’s flight goals change over time…” Aspects of the Task/Evidence: Some examples could include on the map: (1) evidence is provided with the numbers and arrows showing the number of flights and their routes (2) in the timeline key, it shows that Amelia Earhart increased her distance with subsequent flights. Passage examples could include: began as (1) Amelia set altitude record in 1922 (2) earned an international pilots license and moved toward… (3) Amelia was first woman passenger to cross Atlantic (4) She went across the Atlantic (5) she continued to break records after the flight Focused and organized, consistently addressing: Student is focused on the number of flights and the increasing distance of the flights. Constructed Response Interim Assessment Answer Key Standard RI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

9 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 9 Interim Assessment - Selected Response Answer Key Reporting Categories KEY DETAILS MAIN IDEA REASONING STRUCTURE

10 10 Interim Student Assessment Name________________________ Interim Assessment Reading Informational Text Interim Assessment Reading Informational Text

11 11 Amelia Earhart Secondhand Account Amelia Earhart Learns to Fly Amelia Earhart was born in Atchison, Kansas, on July 24, In those days, airplanes were not nearly as common as they are today. Earhart was 12 years old before she ever saw an airplane, and she did not take her first flight until Amelia Earhart was so thrilled by her first airplane ride that she quickly began to take flying lessons. She wrote, "As soon as I left the ground, I knew I had to fly." Earhart excelled as a pilot. Her first instructor was Neta Snook, one of the first women to graduate from the Curtiss School of Aviation. Earhart borrowed money from her mother to buy a two-seat plane. She got her U.S. flying license in December 1921, and by October 1922, she set an altitude record for women of 14,000 feet. In 1923, Earhart received her international pilot's license - only the 16th woman to do so. At the same time, she was becoming famous for her aviation achievements. Amelia Earhart Flies Across the Atlantic In 1928, Amelia Earhart received a phone call that would change her life. She was invited to become the first woman passenger to cross the Atlantic Ocean in a plane. "The idea of just going as 'extra weight' did not appeal to me at all," she said, but she accepted the offer nonetheless. On June 17, after several delays due to bad weather, Amelia Earhart flew in a plane named Friendship with co-pilots Wilmer "Bill" Stultz and Louis "Slim" Gordon. The plane landed at Burry Port, South Wales, with just a small amount of fuel left. Earhart's first trip across the Atlantic took more than 20 hours! After that flight Earhart became a media sensation. Following the trip, she was given parties and even a ticker tape parade down Broadway in New York City. President Coolidge called to congratulate her on crossing the Atlantic. Because Earhart's record-breaking career and physical appearance were similar to pioneering pilot and American hero Charles Lindbergh, she earned the nickname "Lady Lindy.“ Earhart wrote a book about her first flight across the Atlantic, called 20 Hrs., 40 Min. She continued to break records. She also polished her skills as a speaker and writer, always advocating women's achievements, especially in aviation.

12 12 Amelia Earhart’s Interview Firsthand hand Account This passage is part of an interview that Amelia Earhart gave after her first Atlantic flight in “Well, I’ll try to give you some of the highlights of the trip if you wish. “I took off from the famous Harbor Grace runway at dusk at about 7:30 I believe. I flew for a couple of hours while sunset lasted and then two more hours as the moon came up over a bank of clouds. I had fair weather for 4 hours. Then I ran into a storm, which was one of the most severe I had ever been in. I [wandered] around in the storm for probably an hour and, with difficulty, kept my course. I had been troubled with my [part of the engine] burning through all night. A weld broke shortly after I left Harbor Grace and I could see the damage increasing as the night wore on. I found thunderstorms probably three or four hundred miles off the coast of Ireland. I believe I saw land and I decided to come down …in the best available pasture. I got down without any trouble and [drove the plane] to the front door of a surprised farmer’s cottage. After receiving a real Irish welcome, I took a plane to London and there received a real English welcome.”

13 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 13 1.Which structure did the author use to organize the passage Amelia Earhart? A.chronology B.comparison C.cause and effect D.Problem and solution Standard RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. Standard RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. 2.Which statement best summarizes the account of the passage Amelia Earhart ? A.Amelia Earhart excelled as a pilot and had many aviation achievements. B.Amelia Earhart was the 16 th woman to gain an international pilot’s license. C.Amelia Earhart was an advocate for women’s rights. D.Amelia Earhart was 12 when she saw her first plane.

14 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond Which statement identifies the focus of Amelia Earhart’s Interview ? A.It explained an engine problem she had while flying. B.It described the important events that happened during her first solo flight across the Atlantic. C.It described the thunderstorm she flew through during the flight. D.It talked about the welcome she got when she arrived in Ireland and England. Standard RI.4.6 Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided. 4. Which of these would be an appropriate addition to paragraph 3 of the passage Amelia Earhart? A.Amelia Earhart was excited to be the first woman passenger to cross the Atlantic in a plane. B.Amelia would rather fly the plane herself than just being “added weight.” C.Many people congratulated Amelia for being the first woman passenger to cross the Atlantic in a plane. D.Amelia was surprised to land in a farmer’s pasture. Standard RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

15 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond Why would a reader want to read Amelia Earhart’s Interview instead of Amelia Earhart ? A.Readers may want to hear Earhart tell about an experience from her perspective. B.Readers may want a neutral point of view when learning about Earhart. C.Readers may want a very brief account of Earhart’s experiences. D.Readers may want to learn about Earhart’s life. 6. Based on the map, what was Amelia probably trying to accomplish on her final flight? A.Amelia was attempting to fly to 3 different continents in one trip. B.Amelia was trying to make the longest flight without stopping. C.Amelia was attempting to circle the globe. D.Amelia wanted to fly to every country. Standard RI.4.6 Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided. Standard RI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

16 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond After reading the information from both the first and second- hand accounts, what can you say about what it takes to be a successful pilot like Amelia Earhart? Use examples from both passages to support your answer. (RI.4.6) Standard RI.4.6 Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

17 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond According to the passage Amelia Earhart how did Amelia’s flight goals change as time went on? Use details from the map to support your answer. (RI.4.7) (Teacher Only) Final Score_____ Standard RI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

18 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 18 Duke Ellington’s Early Years Duke Ellington was born in Washington D.C., and from an early age he loved music. When he was four years old, he listened to his mother play a popular piano tune called "The Rosary" and he cried, saying, "It was so pretty. So pretty." Not long after that, at the age of seven, he began to play piano himself. It seems that he knew he was going to go places. He told his next-door neighbor, Mr. Pinn, "One of these days I'm going to be famous." How old do you think Duke Ellington was when he started writing music? At age 15, Ellington worked at a soda fountain and wrote his first song, "Soda Fountain Rag." By his late teens, he was making enough money to help his parents move into a better house. He earned 75 cents. "It was the most money I had ever seen," he said. "I rushed all the way home to my mother with it.” Ellington studied music during the ragtime era. Ragtime was a kind of popular American music consisting of off-beat dance rhythms that began with the honky-tonk pianists along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. By the time he was 20, he and his friends formed a band that would be the foundation for his life's work. From 1923 to 1927, he and his band lived in New York City and made about 60 recordings. Their first big break came on December 4, 1927, at the opening night of what would turn out to be a long engagement at the Cotton Club in New York City's Harlem neighborhood. The Ellington Orchestra often broadcast live on radio from the Cotton Club, so their unique style of jazz became familiar to people across the country.

19 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond According to the text, how old was Duke Ellington when he began playing piano by himself? A.four years old B.seven years old C.in his late teens D.when he was Which statement from the text infers that Duke made money writing songs while he was still a teenager? A.It seems that he knew he was going to go places. B.By his late teens, [Ellington] was making enough money to help his parents move into a better house. C.Ellington studied music during the ragtime era. D.By the time he was 20, he and his friends formed a band that would be the foundation for his life's work. Standard RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Standard RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

20 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond Which detail from the article describes Duke Ellington’s first big break? A.Ellington began to play the piano by himself. B.At age 15, Ellington wrote his first song, "Soda Fountain Rag." C.Ellington’s band made 60 recordings while living in New York. D.Ellington and his band performed at the Cotton Club in New York City. 12. What is the main idea of the passage about Duke Ellington? A.Duke Ellington loved music and learned to play the piano. B.Duke Ellington worked at a soda fountain when he was 15. C.Ellington turned his interest in music into a successful career. D.The Ellington Orchestra often broadcast from the Cotton Club. Standard RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Standard RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

21 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond What is the main idea of the first paragraph in the passage Duke Ellington ? A.Ellington listened to his mother play piano music when he was four. B.Ellington began playing piano when he was seven. C.Ellington’s love of music began when he was a child. D.Ellington’s mother was a talented pianist. 14. Paragraph three tells how Ellington and his orchestra became successful. Which key detail supports this main idea? A.Ellington studied music during the ragtime era. B.Honky-tonk pianists played along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. C.Ragtime was a popular type of American music played by honky-tonk pianists. D.Ellington and his orchestra were often broadcast live on the radio and became familiar to many. Standard RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. Standard RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

22 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond What happened when Ellington wrote his first song? A.Ellington started a band that played at the Cotton Club. B.Ellington got a job at a soda fountain. C.Ellington earned money as a musician. D.Ellington’s song was played on the radio. 16. What caused Ellington’s early interest in music? A.Ellington was born in Washington D.C. B.Ellington listened to his mother play the piano. C.Ellington wanted to be famous. D.Ellington enjoyed earning money. Standard RI.4.3 Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. Standard RI.4.3 Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

23 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 23 STOP Close your books and wait for instructions!

24 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 24 Student Self-Check How Did You Do? Directions: Check the box for each answer as Correct or Not Correct.CorrectNotCorrect Question 1 Question 1 Which structure did the author use to organize the text? RI.4.5 Question 2 Question 2 What statement best summarizes the account of the passage Amelia Earhart ? RI.4.2 Question 3 Question 3 Which statement identifies the focus of Amelia’s interview? RI.4.6 Question 4 Question 4 Which of these would be an appropriate addition to paragraph 3 of the passage Amelia Earhart? RI.4.3 Question 5 Question 5 Why would a reader want to read an interview of Amelia Earhart instead of a second hand account? RI.4.6 Question 6 Question 6 Based on the map, What was Amelia probably trying to accomplish on her final flight? RI.4.7 Question 7: Constructed Response Question 7: Constructed Response Circle Final Score3210 Question 8: Constructed Response Question 8: Constructed Response Circle Final Score3210 Question 9 Question 9 According to the text, how old was Duke Ellington when he began playing piano by himself? RI.4.1 Question 10 Question 10 Which statement from the text infers that Duke made money writing songs while he was still a teenager? RI.4.1 Question 11 Question 11 What detail from the article describes Duke Ellington’s first big break? RI.4.1 Question 12 Question 12 What is the main idea of the passage about Duke Ellington? RI.4.2 Question 13 Question 13 What is the main idea of the first paragraph in the passage Duke Ellington? RI.4.2 Question 14 Question 14 Paragraph three tells how Ellington and his orchestra became successful. Which key detail supports this main idea? RI.4.2 Question 15 Question 15 What happened when Ellington wrote his first song? RI.4.3 Question 16 Question 16 What caused Ellington’s early interest in music? RI.4.3

25 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 25 Question no.___


Download ppt "1 Grade 4 Teacher Directions Hillsboro Elementary Interim Assessment Interim Assessment Reading Informational Text Interim Assessment Reading Informational."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google