Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

LIFE IN THE NORTH AND SOUTH 1847-1861 BEFORE BROTHER FOUGHT BROTHER.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "LIFE IN THE NORTH AND SOUTH 1847-1861 BEFORE BROTHER FOUGHT BROTHER."— Presentation transcript:

1 LIFE IN THE NORTH AND SOUTH BEFORE BROTHER FOUGHT BROTHER

2 OVERVIEW OF UNIT Take your best guess: What differences existed between ordinary Americans living in the North and those living in the South years before the Civil War? What important issues are reflected in the differences between life in the North and the South? What kinds of changes were taking place in the United States at the time?

3 OVERVIEW OF UNIT OBJECTIVES: List three differences and three similarities between life in the North and the South in the years before the Civil War. Discuss how these differences contributed to serious disagreements between the North and South.

4 BACKGROUND INFORMATION Before the Civil War, people were doing their best to compromise over representation, federalism, tariffs and territories We are going to look at primary sources to better understand and “get a feel for” what life was like in the North and the South before The Civil War.

5 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation OBJECTIVES: List three differences and three similarities between life in the North and the South in the years before the Civil War. Discuss how these differences contributed to serious disagreements between the North and South.

6 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation QUESTIONS: What differences existed between ordinary Americans living in the North and those living in the South in the years before the Civil War? What important issues are reflected in the differences between life in the North and the South? What kinds of changes were taking place in the United States at the time?

7 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation BACKGROUND: Read the information on your background information handout for Lesson One The purpose of this lesson is to prepare you with background information for understanding the causes of the Civil War.

8 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation Can anyone in the class describe an incident they witnessed or heard as an example of how any of the following potential conflicts can lead to a serious disagreement? What one person was doing prevented someone else from doing what he or she needed to do. One person was so different from another that neither could understand the other or that their needs were conflicting. Someone was treating someone else very badly.

9 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation “During the first half of the 19th century, economic differences between the regions also increased. By 1860 cotton was the chief crop of the South, and it represented 57 percent of all U.S. exports. The profitability of cotton, known as King Cotton, completed the South's dependence on the plantation system and its essential component, slavery. The North was by then firmly established as an industrial society. Labor was needed, but not slave labor.” —Source: "Civil War, American." Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2000

10 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation “Five years ago Mr. and Mrs. Kirke Boott took up their residence at Lowell where there was then no building except one or two little hovels, but last night we went over very extensive cotton manufacturies that have sprung up since that time, and on every side fresh ones are starting into life. This State is so very bad for agricultural purposes that they are driven to manufactures to gain a livelihood?” —Margaret Hall, writing about Lowell, Massachusetts October 13, 1827

11

12

13 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation Compare Factories and Plantations using the rules and the handout you have.

14 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation Go Down Moses (traditional spiritual): ◦ When Israel was in Egypt's Land: Let my people go. Oppress'd so hard they could not stand, Let my people go ◦ Refrain: Go down Moses 'way down in Egypt's land Tell ol' Pharaoh, Let my peoples go. ◦ Thus saith the Lord, bold Moses said: Let my people go. If not I'll smite your firstborn dead, Let my people go.: ◦ O let us all from bondage flee; Let my people go. And let us all in Christ be free! Let my people go.

15 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation Factory (North):1836 Song Lyrics Sung by Protesting Workers at Lowell: Oh! isn't it a pity, such a pretty girl as I Should be sent to the factory to pine away and die? Oh! I cannot be a slave, I will not be a slave, For I'm so fond of liberty, That I cannot be a slave.

16 NORTH Women WeaversWoman working at weaving machine

17 SLAVES ON SOUTHERN PLANTATION Perhaps the largest group of slaves to be photographed at one time

18 COTTON IN THE SOUTH COTTON PRESSCOTTON GIN

19 LESSON 1: Factory vs. Plantation Things to Think About: 1. What are 3 differences and 3 similarities between the north and the south that you can see from this section? 2. What major problems do you think these differences may cause?

20 LESSON 2 PEOPLE AND PLACES OF THE NORTH AND SOUTH

21 LESSON 2: People and Places QUESTIONS: 1. What differences existed between ordinary Americans living in the North and those living in the South in the years before the Civil War? What important issues are reflected in the differences between life in the North and the South? What kinds of changes were taking place in the United States at the time?

22 LESSON 2: People and Places OBJECTIVES: List three differences and three similarities between life in the North and the South in the years before the Civil War. Discuss how these differences contributed to serious disagreements between the North and South.

23 LESSON 2: People and Places Can anyone describe an incident they witnessed or heard as an example of how any of the following potential conflicts can lead to a serious disagreement? What one person was doing prevented someone else from doing what he or she needed to do. One person was so different from another that neither could understand the other or that their needs were conflicting. Someone was treating someone else very badly.

24 LESSON 2: People and Places Starting in the early 19th Century the United States underwent an industrial revolution. The work that many people did changed as they moved from farms and small workshops into larger factories. They tended to buy things in stores, rather than make them at home or trade with their neighbors. They used machines, and purchased the products of machines, more than they ever had. Source: Whole ClothWhole Cloth

25 LESSON 2: People and Places Augusta County, VA – South Franklin County, PA – North Very close to one another but very different

26 LESSON 2: People and Places Using the iPads complete the handout I have given you doing research on these two communities.

27 LESSON 2: People and Places

28 By 1860, the North had about two and a half times the population of the South (about 22 million compared to about 9 million, including the South's 3.5 million slaves) and was more urban and industrial. Of the top 25 cities by population in 1860, only three were located in the South: Louisville (ranked #12, with a population of 68,033), Charleston (#22, population 40,522) and Richmond (#25, population 37,910). New York in the North

29 LESSON 2: People and Places New York – 813,660 people-1860

30 LESSON 2: People and Places

31 Richmond, VA – Commercial and Industrial center. Slave Market

32 LESSON 2: People and Places

33 Lesson 3: A Debate Against Slavery Guiding Questions What differences existed between ordinary Americans living in the North and those living in the South in the years before the Civil War? What important issues are reflected in the differences between life in the North and the South? What kinds of changes were taking place in the United States at the time?

34 Lesson 3: A Debate Against Slavery Learning Objectives At the end of this lesson plan students will be able to Understand the conflict between North and South over the issue of slavery Be familiar wit the arguments for and against slavery, and the history of abolitionist sentiment in America Be familiar with the working and living conditions for slaves Be familiar with the working and living conditions for wage workers in the North Be aware of the extent, geographic and demographic, of slavery.

35 Lesson 3: A Debate Against Slavery Keep in Mind: Sometimes, people will fight to keep someone else from being treated poorly. Disagreement over slavery was central to the conflict between the North and the South. The nation was deeply divided. Note: Slavery was a cruel system. To study slavery means to encounter facts and/or images some students may find unsettling—including the fact that many people in the South vigorously defended it. Sensitivity to these issues is recommended throughout this lesson.

36

37 Lesson 3: A Debate Against Slavery

38 In the north, Pay was low, hours were long, workplaces were dangerous and much was expected of the workers, who were at the same time looked down upon by almost anyone in a superior position. Such conditions served as fodder for people who apologized for or even supported slavery in their arguments against abolition, which were ultimately arguments that defended racism.

39 Lesson 4: Life Before the Civil War In the decade-and-a-half prior to the Civil War, the United States saw dramatic changes in industrialization in the North, and a rapid increase in transportation (rail and steamship) all over the country. It was also a time when the country was absorbing new territorial acquisitions, and lifestyle differences and attitudes between North and South were becoming more pronounced.

40 Lesson 4: Life Before the Civil War Your task  compare and contrast life in Franklin, PA vs Augusta, VA by exploring documents in the Valley of the Shadow (online resources found on Miss Myers’ Webpage) You will compare and contrast newspaper articles, images and documents to make assessments on how life was different prior to the Civil War.


Download ppt "LIFE IN THE NORTH AND SOUTH 1847-1861 BEFORE BROTHER FOUGHT BROTHER."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google