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City of Richmond Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services Committee June 28, 2005 Presentation by an Alliance of 13 Richmond Soccer Associations.

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Presentation on theme: "City of Richmond Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services Committee June 28, 2005 Presentation by an Alliance of 13 Richmond Soccer Associations."— Presentation transcript:

1 City of Richmond Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services Committee June 28, 2005 Presentation by an Alliance of 13 Richmond Soccer Associations

2 Proposal for New Soccer Fields Strategy and Facilities Define a new partnership with the City, built on the City’s ‘Guiding Principles’. Define a new partnership with the City, built on the City’s ‘Guiding Principles’. A cooperative, inclusive approach, endorsed by Richmond Sports Council. A cooperative, inclusive approach, endorsed by Richmond Sports Council. Provide fields better meeting current needs. Provide fields better meeting current needs. Improve the parks experience of the overall Community - sport and non-sport users. Improve the parks experience of the overall Community - sport and non-sport users.

3 Strategy and Benefits Build a “Richmond Training Centre” with 4 artificial turf fields. Build a “Richmond Training Centre” with 4 artificial turf fields. Reduce the number of grass fields required by nearly 50, freeing up 40 acres of park space. Reduce the number of grass fields required by nearly 50, freeing up 40 acres of park space. Reduce chronic, documented over-use and damage to grass fields - restore sustainability. Reduce chronic, documented over-use and damage to grass fields - restore sustainability. Improve quality of diamonds for summer sports. Improve quality of diamonds for summer sports. Improve availability and quality of playing fields for other community user groups. Improve availability and quality of playing fields for other community user groups. Reduce City costs to restore over-used fields. Reduce City costs to restore over-used fields. Everybody Wins!

4 13 Richmond Soccer Associations Fall-Winter Richmond Youth Soccer (Boy’s - incl. West / South Arm/ North / Central)1,550 Richmond Girls Soccer 1,000 Richmond Senior Soccer League (Men’s)600 Richmond Women’s Soccer240 Vancouver Metro Men’s (Richmond teams)180 Total Fall/Winter3,570 Spring/Summer Richmond Youth Soccer (Co-ed)500 Richmond Women’s Soccer200 Richmond 6 a-side Men’s League160 Richmond Regional Soccer League (Men’s)220 Richmond Recreational League (Men’s)200 BC Christian Soccer League (Men’s: Richmond teams) 50 Total Spring/Summer1,330

5 Soccer in Richmond 3,700 fall/winter players, 1,300 spring/summer. 3,700 fall/winter players, 1,300 spring/summer. Two-thirds are youth; of which 40% are female. Two-thirds are youth; of which 40% are female. Steady growth - 23% in last ten years. Steady growth - 23% in last ten years. Growth due to women’s and girls’ participation. Growth due to women’s and girls’ participation. Volunteer-run, >50,000 hours per year. Volunteer-run, >50,000 hours per year. Field Needs: Field Needs:  Adequate lit fields for practices.  Good quality, safe fields for all games.

6 Soccer Fields in Richmond 2 artificial turf (AT), 17 ‘sand’, 75+ clay. 2 artificial turf (AT), 17 ‘sand’, 75+ clay. Shortage of sand fields. Shortage of sand fields. 10 sand fields lit for practice use. 10 sand fields lit for practice use.  Lit sand fields chronically over-used. Recommended use = 12 hours/wk. Recommended use = 12 hours/wk. Current use = 32 hours/wk. Current use = 32 hours/wk. Superb in October, but decay rapidly. Superb in October, but decay rapidly. Poor for 2 nd half of season and summer sport. Poor for 2 nd half of season and summer sport. $15,000 each to maintain/restore. $15,000 each to maintain/restore.

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9 City-OwnedOtherSchool-Owned Richmond Fields: Possible Releases Example

10 Fields Strategy Benefits for Soccer 4 new AT fields 4 new AT fields Weekday practices and weekend games. Weekday practices and weekend games. Most practices on AT surfaces Most practices on AT surfaces Most games on AT and sand fields + better clay. Most games on AT and sand fields + better clay. Field usage sustainable  remain good quality. Field usage sustainable  remain good quality. Restore Minoru Oval to ‘showcase’ facility. Restore Minoru Oval to ‘showcase’ facility. Meet needs until 2011, e.g., until major DFO facility. Meet needs until 2011, e.g., until major DFO facility.

11 Fields Strategy Benefits for Community Release of 47 fields - 40 acres - for other uses. Release of 47 fields - 40 acres - for other uses. Improved playing surfaces for summer sports. Improved playing surfaces for summer sports. Reduced community friction re small fields. Reduced community friction re small fields. Facility available for other sports, community use, schools, etc. Facility available for other sports, community use, schools, etc. Attract tournaments, e.g., Provincial Cups, for opportunity, recognition and financial benefit. Attract tournaments, e.g., Provincial Cups, for opportunity, recognition and financial benefit.

12 Location, Dates, Costs Site requirements acres. Site requirements acres. Focused on concept, not a specific location. Focused on concept, not a specific location. Ideally West of No. 4 Road. Ideally at one site. Ideally West of No. 4 Road. Ideally at one site. Options include DFO, South Arm, Hugh Boyd, others. Options include DFO, South Arm, Hugh Boyd, others. Fall 2006 target completion. Fall 2006 target completion. Or Plan and Phase 1 in ‘06, build-out in ‘08. Or Plan and Phase 1 in ‘06, build-out in ‘08. New lit AT field = $1.5 million  $6.0 million. New lit AT field = $1.5 million  $6.0 million. Economies of four  $5.0 million. Plus $1.0 for building. Economies of four  $5.0 million. Plus $1.0 for building. Parks Dept. may recommend for 2006 capital spending. Parks Dept. may recommend for 2006 capital spending. Soccer groups’ contribution, possible partnering, grants. Soccer groups’ contribution, possible partnering, grants. Broad community benefits  City discretionary funds. Broad community benefits  City discretionary funds.

13 Richmond’s Soccer Associations’ Commitment Contribute $250,000 capital. Contribute $250,000 capital. $80 per youth, $40 per adult. $80 per youth, $40 per adult. Pay annual maintenance fees of $140,000. Pay annual maintenance fees of $140,000. Close to half maintenance costs. Close to half maintenance costs. Annual fees: Youth - $30 : Adults - $45. Annual fees: Youth - $30 : Adults - $45. Seek further sponsorship and external contributions. Seek further sponsorship and external contributions.

14 Next Steps The delegation respectfully requests that the Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services Committee: Endorse this proposal in principle; Endorse this proposal in principle; Refer it to staff for review and recommendations regarding implementation, and; Refer it to staff for review and recommendations regarding implementation, and; Require these recommendations be returned to Committee/Council for final approval by September Require these recommendations be returned to Committee/Council for final approval by September 2005.


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