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E-Safety – Parents and Students (Glen Park Primary School)

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1 E-Safety – Parents and Students (Glen Park Primary School)
Growing up online…. E-Safety – Parents and Students (Glen Park Primary School)

2 Growing up online…. Welcome & Introduction Who am I? - Paul Gorvin
- Deputy head of Coombe Dean School - CEOP trained (Child Exploitation & Online Protection – Government Agency) What is this session? Covering some key issues related to e-safety for 5-12 year olds Provide information on sources to get support/help Answering any questions where possible

3 Growing up online…. E-Safety in school Teaching in School
E-safety covered as part of ‘Computing’ curriculum (in Primary + Secondary) Also tacked as ‘whole school’ focus ‘Safer Internet Day’ – Yearly event in February

4 Growing up online…. E-Safety in school Procedures to protect in school
Internet Filtering / Monitoring (SWGfL) Networking monitoring Designated child safety official (Secondary) CEOP training for staff

5 From School, to the outside world
School use Children accessing the Internet 93% of all 5-15 year olds used the internet in 2013. 71% of children 5-15s access to tablet computer (42% use to go online aged 5-15, 20% aged 3-4) Broken down: four in five 5-7 year olds (82%), and nearly all 8-11 year olds (96%) and year olds (99%). Time spent online Estimated weekly volume of internet use at home in 2013: 6.5 hours for 3-4 year olds 6.7 hours for 5-7 year olds 9.2 hours for 8-11 year olds 17.0 hours for year olds Outside of school Source: Ofcom (2013) Children and parents: media use and attitudes report (PDF)

6 Being online – Positives for young people?
Communication skills Money management Being online – Positives for young people? Computer skills Commitment Confidence Communication skills – communicating is one of the prime reasons for children going online. They are talking to others, sharing their lives, building connections and friendships. Children have the opportunity to build and maintain connections and communication with a far wider group of people than has been possible in the past. Computer skills – children are engrossed in technology at a very young age. They see older siblings or family members using computers and Iphones and quickly copy them. How many of your children before the age of 5 knew how to operate your phone or laptop? These skills are then developed and enhanced over time. As technology plays an increasingly important part in all of our lives so does the importance of being able to use it effectively. Creativity – Through building online spaces and avatars (online characters), online games encourage you to be creative. By using their creativity in this environment children are learning new skills, exploring their imagination and opening their minds to new opportunities. Research – Children research online. They turn to search engines and other online tools to find out about an interest or piece of history. They are learning how to find and understand complex information from a range of sources and apply this knowledge. Being able to navigate the internet in this way is going to be an increasingly important skill, both in daily life and at work. Confidence – The internet gives you the ability to be anybody you want to be and try new things. In the real world a child may struggle to build friendships, but online they can be a ‘popular’ king of an online universe (literally!). Money management – Who here has bought their child online currency, or an online game membership for their child? Children build accounts online and use the currency gained or bought to buy key pieces of online merchandise, such as pets or furniture. Gaming companies suggest that by doing so, they are learning money management. A key lesson is that you can’t buy everything you want and you must work for it. What do you think? Can anybody think of anything I have missed? Research Creativity

7 Growing up online…. What are children doing online?
Can you name the sites your children uses for: Things are changing though… Facebook has all 6!

8 Main areas of use Social networking Instant messaging
Facebook/ Youtube / Twitter /Instagram Instant messaging Skype/ BBM/ Whatsapp / Snapchat Blogs and chat sites Tumblr/ Ask FM / Spillit Gaming Consoles / free and paid Mobile technology Applications, Music, Steaming, Gaming

9 Social networking Based on research from NSPCC (2013/14)…
Over 1 billion accounts Over half a million comments posted every single minute Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) mandates that websites that collect information about users (like Facebook) aren't allowed to sign on anyone under the age of 13 Based on research from NSPCC (2013/14)… 92% of children and young people had accessed social networking sites and apps before the age of 13; (36% had signed up to Facebook and 60% to YouTube) Most popular social networking platforms used by children and young people were YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat and Minecraft In 73% of the cases/sites used, children provided an alternative minimum age to the official age stipulated by the networks. Facebook Over 1 billion accounts Over half a million comments posted every single minute Suggested teenagers moving away from FB to other places like Twitter Change functions often, difficult to keep up to date without being a member Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) mandates that websites that collect information about users (like Facebook) aren't allowed to sign on anyone under the age of 13

10 Social networking What else is being used? YouTube Twitter Instagram
Slightly (largely) more scary… Omegle: Talk to strangers! Chatroulette Ask.fm These are some screen grabs from three more highly popular social networking sites. Twitter, Youtube and Instagram. All these websites require users to be over 13 to have an account Twitter With an estimated 72 million active twitter accounts (as of December 2012), Twitter has found widespread appeal due to the ability to ‘Follow’ and share information, news and gossip with anyone else on Twitter – from friends and family to celebrities. Twitter is proving to be increasingly popular with young people, and whilst users can make their posts private (i.e. only visible to people they have accepted as followers) users may feel encouraged to keep their posts open to all Twitter users. YouTube YouTube allows users to create their own channel for uploading videos. YouTube channels can be open to the public or restricted to specific users or groups. Users can subscribe to other people’s channels to receive updates about new content and as a user you can decide whether people can comment on, ‘thumbs up’ or ‘thumbs down’ their videos. Over 800 million unique users visit YouTube each month Over 4 billion hours of video are watched each month on YouTube 72 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute Instagram Instagram users can share their photos with other people on Instagram, comment, like, search for and follow specific people and search for hashtags for specific types of photos people have posted. A new Photo Map feature allows geo-tagging of photos – CEOP advise that this feature should be switched of for young people. Users can report inappropriate photos to Instagram. 90 million Monthly Active Users 40 million Photos Per Day 8500 Likes Per Second 1000 Comments Per Second Once again children and young people need to think carefully about what they share and who they share it with. Create profiles and can send each other questions, with the option of doing so anonymously

11 But quite possibly most popular IM among younger audience
Instant messaging Private messaging Skype – IM, Voice + Webcam chat BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) – Free to BlackBerry uses, now available on other platforms WhatsApp – Send message, audio files, photos, Video, etc. Contacts from address book + Group cha But quite possibly most popular IM among younger audience SnapChat – Messages, Photos, Videos sent to contacts and expire after set time 1-10 secs (except, now ways to save!!) Here are some examples of networks and apps that allow users to send private instant messages. All of which are free to other users within the service. BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) is an instant messaging service that is free to all BlackBerry users. Users have a unique pin that they can share to allow others to chat with them. Users can send text based messages, links, pictures and videos to individuals or to groups of people they have added. WhatsApp is similar to BBM in that it allows users to send messages, audio files, photos, videos and a current location to people on their contact list. Contacts are added automatically based on the phone numbers stored in a mobile device. Contacts can also create group chats that involve other WhatsApp users outside of their own list of contacts. Skype is similar to both WhatsApp and BBM with the addition feature of allowing webcam conversations between users. Children and young people are more likely to take risks and share private information such as photos in a private space. Inform the audience that private messaging needs to only happen with people they know and trust in the real world. If this is not possible the chat needs to remain public, or they limit what they share.

12 Blogging and chat sites
These are some examples of popular blogging and chat websites. Some of these sites allow you to post anonymously which can cause cyberbullying issues. On Tumblr, users can create their own public or private blog where they can post information, updates and content. Users can follow, like and comment on specific blog posts and can also reblog and repost information from another blog onto their own. Users can change the layout and appearance of their blog allowing individuality between different blog pages. Ask.fm is a question and answer based website where users can create an account and receive questions from other members. The questions can be posted anonymously, and Ask.fm accounts can also be linked to Facebook accounts via an app.

13 Gaming Ask the audience if they can tell you the names of the gaming sites their child uses? As you will know, gaming is very different to how it used to be. Put Pacman and Tetris to the back of your mind and think MMORPG – or ‘Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game’, which in short means that a site can have thousands of users and the game never ends. Many gaming sites allow you to play and communicate against other users all over the world. One of the most popular ways for children to kill time is on their games consoles. Put your hands up if you have a console in your home? Keep your hand up if it links to the internet? The majority of these do, which means your child can link to other users, talk and play against them.

14 Mobile Technology Mobile technology Chat Text Location Online Images
Do you know your child’s favourite apps? Does your child use your phone, are you apps age appropriate? Mobiles now basically mini computers providing wide range of facilities and features including use of Apps: Talking/chatting Texting Going online Taking photos Sharing their location Most mobiles now fitted with GPS feature Great for when you are lost Dangers of tracking and sharing location through ‘checking in’ features e.g. facebook Wide range of Apps available… Do you know your child’s favourite apps? Are all Apps they use age appropriate?

15 Too much to cover everything in detail in one hour session!
So what are the risks? Too much to cover everything in detail in one hour session! Focus on… Inappropriate websites Grooming Cyberbullying

16 Inappropriate websites / content
What do we mean by ‘inappropriate’? Adult xxx images / video Race hate / Pro-eating disorder / Gambling sites Illegal downloads Swearing / Bad language (even in Online Gaming - … example to follow!) Anything else not suitable for young children…

17 Inappropriate websites / content
XBOX Live Abusive Clip What can you do about it?

18 Set on all devices that link to the internet
Inappropriate websites / content Parental controls Used to restrict / limit access to certain content and websites. Can often be ‘age’ or ‘content type’ based Options to set controls on all: Computers Laptops Tablets Mobile devices Games Consoles ALL internet enabled devices (It’s the finding how to do it that can be tricky!) Block sites that are not age appropriate limit inappropriate and illegal material Set timings – automatic switch off at bedtime Monitor activity How can they help? The Internet is not centrally moderated, but as a parent you can set controls on your child’s internet access in the home. Parental controls packages can enable you to block access to adult websites, such as pornographic and gambling sites. 63% of teens surveyed admit they know how to hide what they do online from their parents - Norton Online Living Report 2009 Set on all devices that link to the internet Remember… they are not 100% accurate and not a substitute for open communication!

19 Inappropriate websites / content - Parental controls
Internet Service Providers (ISPs) BT (Parent Controls Service for HomeHub) Talk Talk (HomeSafe) Sky (Broadband Shield) Virgin Media (F-Safe) PlusNet (McAfee) Software available Norton Family AVG Family Safety Microsoft Live Family Safety Device controls Mobile phone operators (Content filtering) Almost all having ‘Parental Control’ services Some provide filters for Under 18, Under 12s (e.g. Tesco mobile) Some turned on by default (e.g. EE) others need to be requested (e.g. Tesco mobile) Online gaming Parental controls available for most controls (e.g. XBOX, PS3, NintendoWii) Controls cover ‘console’ use, and ‘online filtering’ Parental controls can be used to… Filter content Set specific times for internet access Different accounts / restrictions for different users Please remember that once these settings are set, it does not mean that you are 100% “safe”. Some content may slip through the net and you will need to report it to your service provider. Moderation and open communication is most importance.

20 Inappropriate websites / content - Checking browsing history
All internet browsers (e.g. Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Firefox, Safari) have a history feature (list of sites visited). Always best to keep open dialogue about what sites young people visiting, but checking history is an option if concerned NOTE! History can be easily cleared, or avoided using ‘Private’ browsing features Safari (Apple) - Click ‘Bookmarks’ menu - Select ‘History’ Internet Explorer - Click ‘Star’ button - Select ‘History’ Google Chrome - Click ‘Controls’ menu - Select ‘History’ Firefox - Click ‘Firefox’ menu - Select ‘History’

21 Mini-Task 1 Using computers, log onto…
Think about what… - Devices (Laptops, Tablets, Games consoles, Mobiles) - Software (Operating system, Internet Browser) … are used in your home. Do you know how to control their access (parental controls)? Using computers, log onto… Click on ‘Technologies’ and then ‘Parental Controls’ ALSO! Click on ‘E-safety’ menu and select ‘Parents’

22 Grooming (Human Targeting)
Jigsaw video 0 - 2:10

23 Grooming What is online grooming?
A process used to prepare a child for abuse. An offender’s aim to access and build a relationship with a child, often over period of time. How does it work? How would an offender make contact with a child? Through social networking site, gaming site/platform, chat-rooms Offender scan through to identify a target, befriend them, pretend to have common interests, hobbies etc to trick into trusting Once trust established, taken advantage of (requests, sharing of images/video, meeting in the real world).

24 Top tips Grooming – Tips for supporting
Making children aware Talk to your child about online grooming Talk to them about their online friends (adding of friends, etc) Open dialogue Let your child know that you are always there for support and you understand how easy it is for things to get out of control online Teach how to report Facilities to report any inappropriate contact made to your child online (CEOP button, Childline + Block/Report facilities available in online gaming, etc) Protecting themselves online Control over content they post/share (Privacy settings e.g. facebook, Details they share e.g. chatrooms) Talk to your child about online grooming. Explain how easy it can be to lie online and the reasons why an adult may wish to contact them online. Talk about their online friends. Ask them to think carefully about who they chat and share information with. If they don’t know them in the real world they need to delete or limit what they share with them, such as their location, photos and videos. Use the Thinkuknow resources to open a conversation about grooming with your child. Our age appropriate education films are available through the parents and carers website or CEOP youtube channel. Let your child know that you are always there for support. Let them know that you understand how easy it can be to get into difficulties online. Get them to talk to you if anyone makes inappropriate/ sexual comments and that, no matter what’s happened, you are there to help. Learn how to report any inappropriate contact made to your child online. This can be done via the ClickCEOP button at CEOP.police.uk

25 Grooming – Support available (Reporting & Advice)
( ) Produced by CEOP (Child Exploitation and Online Protection) government agency Wide range of information and advice for different age groups 5-7, 8-10, 11-13, 14+ Advice and support for Parents/Carers Reporting service linked to Police Inform the audience that there are support and report services available to them and their child. Further information on CEOP - “If your child has been approached by an adult online. This contact could involve sexual chat, being asked to do something that makes them feel uncomfortable or someone insisting on meeting up. Contact CEOP at – Further information on Childline - “Sometimes children feel like they don’t want to talk to anyone in there family about what's happening to them. Inform them you are always there to listen, but if this ever becomes the case, there are experienced councillors at childline (24/7) who are there for them.” “The Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) CEOP is a police led, child protection agency which specialises in tackling sexual abuse on and offline. Through its Education Programme, Thinkuknow CEOP offers a range of safety information for children, young people, practitioners and parents/carers. For more information visit Reporting to CEOP If someone has acted inappropriately towards your child, it may be inappropriate chat, being asked to do something that makes you feel uncomfortable or someone being insistent on meeting up. You must report it to ClickCEOP at 24 hour confidential helpline for children and young people .

26 Grooming – Tools available
( ) Browser tools available in ‘Parents’ section of website Inform the audience that there are support and report services available to them and their child. Further information on CEOP - “If your child has been approached by an adult online. This contact could involve sexual chat, being asked to do something that makes them feel uncomfortable or someone insisting on meeting up. Contact CEOP at – Further information on Childline - “Sometimes children feel like they don’t want to talk to anyone in there family about what's happening to them. Inform them you are always there to listen, but if this ever becomes the case, there are experienced councillors at childline (24/7) who are there for them.” “The Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) CEOP is a police led, child protection agency which specialises in tackling sexual abuse on and offline. Through its Education Programme, Thinkuknow CEOP offers a range of safety information for children, young people, practitioners and parents/carers. For more information visit Reporting to CEOP If someone has acted inappropriately towards your child, it may be inappropriate chat, being asked to do something that makes you feel uncomfortable or someone being insistent on meeting up. You must report it to ClickCEOP at

27 Is my child too young to have a Facebook account?
Protecting themselves online – Social networking? Is my child too young to have a Facebook account? Help set up their profile Add your as the main contact (if possible) Set the privacy settings to “friends” only and ensure they are children you know Show them a CEOP safety resource which outlines the risks (www.youtube.co.uk/ceop/jigsaw) ‘Like’ the Click CEOP page Check in and keep updated Facebook for Pre Teens Minimum age for Facebook is 13, as required by US law If they allow their child to use sites such as Facebook, they are not breaking the law, just the site’s terms and conditions. If parents and carers are going to allow their child to join, they need to think about: Helping them set up their profile Adding your as the main contact (where possible) Setting the privacy settings to “friends” only and ensure these are friends from the real world and known by you Showing them a CEOP safety resource which outlines the risks (www.youtube.co.uk/ceop/jigsaw) Adding the Click CEOP button – type Click CEOP into the facebook search box. Checking in and keeping updated with the content they are posting and receiving in this space

28 Protecting themselves online – Facebook!
More Settings …Lots of more detailed settings available for Privacy, Timeline and Tagging, Blocking under ‘See More Settings’ Privacy Shortcuts As well as the quick settings available here… Privacy Shortcuts Access using the ‘Padlock’ icon Limiting contact You can set you can send you ‘messages’ and limit who can send ‘friend requests’ Blocking people You can block people directly with name or address Who can see my stuff? Controls for who can see things on your timeline Privacy for posts You can set a default for who sees future posts made View As… You can view your profile as someone else (by default ‘member of the public’)

29 Mini-Task 2 1) Using computers, log onto… www.thinkuknow.co.uk
Explore the information available to parents/careers 1) Using computers, log onto… Click on ‘Parent/Carer?’ link and explore 2) Look at links also provided on LearnCoombeDean.com -> E-Safety -> Parents

30 Cyberbullying What is Cyberbullying?
Bullying that takes place via technology. (gaming sites, mobile devices, social networking site)  How and where can you be Cyberbullied? Can happen 24 hours a day through online technologies Can invade even previously personal spaces (e.g. at home), can feel that there is no escape from it. What can it be? - Text messaging, , Social networking comments/posts/images, Chat/Blog websites “Cyber bullying is bullying that takes place via technology. Whether on gaming sites, through a mobile device or via a social networking site, the effects can be devastating for the young people involved. With online technologies accessible 24 hours a day, cyberbullying can be relentless. It can also intrude on spaces that were previously personal, for example at home; it can feel that there is no escape from it. 21% of 8 to 11 year olds have been deliberately targeted, threatened or humiliated by an individual or group through the use of mobile phone or the internet and 28% of 11 – to 16 year olds. 21% of 8 to 11 year olds have been deliberately targeted, threatened or humiliated by an individual or group through the use of mobile phone or the internet - Source: CEOP

31 Cyberbullying – Tips for supporting
Offer reassurance and support. Don’t be afraid to ask questions Tell your child that if they are being bullied to always keep the evidence - Text messages, s, Screen-prints of posts/messages Block the bullies - Block on chat, social networks, mobile phones (apps available!) Report bullying content to websites it’s hosted on (e.g. Facebook, YouTube, XBOX live).. unless it is illegal, then report to CEOP / Police Continued bullying, take further; in school – contact school, outside school – offending parents/police as final resort. “Cyber bullying is bullying that takes place via technology. Whether on gaming sites, through a mobile device or via a social networking site, the effects can be devastating for the young people involved. With online technologies accessible 24 hours a day, cyberbullying can be relentless. It can also intrude on spaces that were previously personal, for example at home; it can feel that there is no escape from it. 21% of 8 to 11 year olds have been deliberately targeted, threatened or humiliated by an individual or group through the use of mobile phone or the internet and 28% of 11 – to 16 year olds.

32 Top tips Cyberbullying – Tips for supporting
Many websites available for Cyberbullying support, advice… Peer to peer support network for young people who are being bullied Charity with range of information, support staff, events, and Help/Advice service. Information, advice, links and support chat service. Main website -> Click ‘Explore’ -> Scroll to ‘Bullying’ Advice and information for different ages stopcyberbullying.org Offer reassurance and support. Your child may be in need of emotional support or feel like they have nowhere to turn. It is rare that Cyberbullying is only taking place online and is often someone your child knows through school or a group they attend. Their school should have policies and procedures for dealing with cyberbullying. Your child could visit Cybermentors, who are an online counseling service with a difference; the councilors are also children and young people. This site has proved very popular and offers practical advice - Tell your child that if they are being bullied to always keep the evidence. Whether it’s a text message or , tell them not to reply to the bully or delete the comments. Ask your child if they know the bully or where the messages are coming from. Often it is someone within the school environment and can be dealt with quickly and effectively with assistance from the school. Block the bullies If someone is bullying your child on a social networking or chat site encourage them to block or delete them so that they can’t contact them anymore. Report any bullying content to the website it’s hosted on. If content has been posted, for example a video or image, which is upsetting your child you should report it to the website, for example, Facebook. Learn how you would report content on sites like Facebook and YouTube; every site is different. Contacting the website is the only way to get the offensive content removed, unless it is illegal. In cases of illegal content for example indecent images or videos of young people under 18, contact your local police or report it to For further information on all internet related issues and risks visit –


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