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Program Name or Ancillary Texteere.energy.gov U.S. Assessment Approaches and Resources Michaela Martin, PE Program Manager Save Energy Now Initiative Oak.

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Presentation on theme: "Program Name or Ancillary Texteere.energy.gov U.S. Assessment Approaches and Resources Michaela Martin, PE Program Manager Save Energy Now Initiative Oak."— Presentation transcript:

1 Program Name or Ancillary Texteere.energy.gov U.S. Assessment Approaches and Resources Michaela Martin, PE Program Manager Save Energy Now Initiative Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S.-Brazil Industrial Energy Efficiency Workshop Rio de Janeiro, Brazil August 8-11, 2011

2 2 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Discussion Overview Targeting Energy End-Uses and Savings Potential U.S. DOE Assessments –Crosscutting –System-specific Assessment Resources –Experts –QuickPEP, or ePEP –Assessment Standards Large Plant Assessment Results Compressed Air Assessments (Dr. Kissock) Process Heating Assessments (Dr. Muller)

3 3 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov U.S. Energy Footprint for Industry US Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Surveys a sample of US plants every 4 years Inventory of fuel usage Maps end-uses of energy Overview of current energy management practices by US industry Statistical sample representing 200,000 manufacturing plants

4 4 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov End-Use Footprints in US Plants Process Heating Steam Pumps Fans Compressed Air Top Energy Consuming End-Use Systems

5 5 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov System-Based Consumption Fired heating systems –Steam –Process heating Electrical systems –Pumps –Compressed air –Fans Why System Energy Efficiency Matters 5

6 6 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Targeting Savings Potential by System Type Potential Energy Saving Opportunities Typical Energy Consumption Rates * Other ancillary energy usages such as lighting represent less than 2% of energy consumption Process Heating/ Steam Systems 60 – 80% Electric Motor Systems 8-15% Pumping Systems 7-15% Compressed Air Systems 2-7% Other * < 2% 10% to 30%5% to 10%10% to 20% 5% to 10 %

7 7 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Percent of Total U.S. Manufacturing Energy Small 5% Mid-Size 37% Large 58% U.S. Manufacturing Plants: By Size Small Plants Mid-Size Plants Large Plants Number of U.S. Plants All Plants 84, ,398 4, ,710 ITP uses two types of general assessment approaches, to meet the needs of plants of all sizes. System-Specific Assessments >>0.5 TBtu/yr Crosscutting Assessments – 0.49 Tbtu/yr Industrial Energy Assessments

8 8 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Mid-Size 37% Large 58% Small 5% Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Cross-Cutting Energy Assessments Plant Energy (Size) based Approach 4,014 large plants use 58% of the energy Energy Saving Assessments (System focused)

9 9 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Targeted Companies Implementing EntitiesDurationServices Subsidies/ Financing Large energy - intensive plants (≥500 Billion BTU/year in primary energy) Energy Experts - BestPractices Qualified Specialists 3-day system assessment Apply DOE’s software tools and technical expertise to a specific area Free and cost-shared for LEADER companies Provide hands-on training to plant personnel, identify energy savings opportunities Small and medium enterprises (> 26 Billion Btu/year, but <500 billion Btu/year in primary energy) University-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs, many IAC Directors are Qualified Specialists) 1-day assessment Highly trained IAC faculty and students apply DOE software tools and technical expertise Free of charge to SMEs if eligible Identify energy-, waste- and productivity-savings opportunities U.S. DOE Industrial Energy Assessments Recap

10 10 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program conducts a qualification training program to provide qualified energy experts by system area Qualification workshops include classroom and hands-on instruction by highly experienced energy professions, written exams, and certificates Energy Experts are available for system- specific areas (e.g., compressed air, pumping, process heating, steam, and fan systems) DOE Qualified Energy Experts

11 11 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Plant description Utility supply data Energy use information Overview of plant energy Energy cost distributions Preliminary assessment Areas for improvement Energy reduction potential INPUTS OUTPUTS Plant Energy Profiler (PEP) PEP Tool Can Be Used to Determine Initial Approach

12 12 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov ASME System Assessment Standards Developed by US energy experts from utilities, industry, DOE, university IACs, national labs, consulting organizations Based on DOE’s system-based approach Provides comprehensive approach for holistic assessments of energy-intensive systems: –Pumping –Compressed Air –Steam –Process Heating Sets requirements for organizing and conducting assessments collecting and analyzing data reporting results Standards and Guidance Documents available at:

13 13 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Save Energy Now System-Based Large Plant Assessments Conduct Plant Visit Analyze & Report Results Gather Preliminary Data Implementation Follow-up Train Plant Staff Teams are DOE Energy Experts and plant personnel Teams focus on fans, pumps compressors, steam or process heating systems. Plant personnel trained on DOE software tools Successful Project Implementation

14 14 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov System-Type# of DOE Assessments Completed Cost Savings Identified Average Energy Cost Savings Per Plant Identified Process Heating235$341M ($536.7M R$) $1.5M or 10.8% ($2.36M R$) Steam342$686M ($1,079M R$) $2.0M or 7% ($3.1M R$) Compressed Air160$34M ($53.5M R$) $213,000 or 2.4% ($335,000 R$) Fans49$48M ($75.5M R$) $687,000 or 2.9% ($1.08M R$) Pumps91$19M ($29.9M R$) $214,000 or 1.2% ($336,800 R$) DOE Save Energy Now System Assessment Results

15 15 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov TOP TEN FREQUENTLY IDENTIFIED PROCESS HEATING OPPORTUNITIES SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENTS to 2011 Top Ten Frequently Identified Process Heating Opportunities (ESAs to 2011) No. of Times Identified Average Energy MMBtu Savings Identified (Source) Average Source Energy Savings % Identified (%) Average Energy Cost Savings Identified ($) Average Energy Cost Savings % Identified (%) Average of Payback Period Actual (yr) Reduce oxygen content of flue (exhaust) gases18324,4151.2$177, Use of flue or Exhaust gas heat for combustion air preheating 12367,3253.6$407, Proper insulation and maintenance of furnace structure or parts 12024,4761.0$166, Reduce-eliminate openings and air leakage in the furnace 7620,3431.1$154, Load or charge preheating using heat from flue or exhaust gas or other source of waste heat 7230,1731.5$245, Heat cascading - use of flue or Exhaust gas heat from higher temp. process to supply heat to lower temperature processes 6153,6802.1$407, Use of proper heating methods - replace inefficient and uneconomical methods with economical/efficient system 5483,0616.5$407, Heat recovery from hot products or other heat sources (i.e. from walls) from a furnace - oven 4482,9632.8$558, Furnace scheduling, loading, shut down - avoiding delays, waits, cooling between operations etc. 4036,0582.3$323, Use of oxygen for combustion3785,9492.6$598, * Based on Save Energy Now assessments conducted between 2006 to Numbers are as of July 1, 2011.

16 16 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Top Ten Frequently Identified Steam Opportunities (ESAs to 2011) No. of Times Identified Average Energy MMBtu Savings Identified (Source) Average Source Energy Savings % Identified (%) Average Energy Cost Savings Identified ($) Average Energy Cost Savings % Identified (%) Average of Payback Period Actual (yr) Change Boiler Efficiency37629,1360.9$206, Reduce Steam Demand by Changing the Process Steam Requirements 30181,4552.0$482, Improve Insulation23313,0160.5$97, Implement Steam Trap Maintenance Program15322,3270.6$167, Change Condensate Recovery Rates13627,5870.7$250, Add or Modify Operation of Backpressure Steam Turbine 12368,9921.1$479, Modify Feedwater Heat Recovery Exchanger using Boiler Blowdown 11315,4860.4$108, Implement Steam Leak Maintenance Program11314,6170.3$73, Change Boiler Blowdown Rate9815,7290.3$135, Reduce or Recover Vented Steam6820,1430.8$137, * Based on Save Energy Now assessments conducted between 2006 to Numbers are as of July 1, TOP TEN FREQUENTLY IDENTIFIED STEAM OPPORTUNITIES SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENTS to 2011

17 17 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Top Ten Frequently Identified Compressed Air Opportunities (ESAs to 2011) No. of Times Identified Average Energy MMBtu Savings Identified (Source) Average Source Energy Savings % Identified (%) Average Energy Cost Savings Identified ($) Average Energy Cost Savings % Identified (%) Average of Payback Period Actual (yr) Improve End Use Efficiency1325,0200.4$27, Reduce Air Leaks1237,7110.6$41, Reduce System Air Pressure814,5030.3$26, Multiple Compressor Control (install / improve)809,0570.7$50, Open Blowing329,9420.5$58, Improve Trim Compressor Part Load Efficiency286,5531.0$37, Reduce Run Time286,1650.5$33, Improve Compressor Intake Condition172,2730.1$11, Adjust Cascading Set Points124,9960.4$32, Reduce Supply Side Pressure103,5890.2$18, * Based on Save Energy Now assessments conducted between 2006 to Numbers are as of July 1, TOP TEN FREQUENTLY IDENTIFIED COMPRESSED AIR OPPORTUNITIES SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENTS to 2011

18 18 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Top Ten Frequently Identified Pump Opportunities (ESAs to 2011) No. of Times Identified Average Energy MMBtu Savings Identified (Source) Average Source Energy Savings % Identified (%) Average Energy Cost Savings Identified ($) Average Energy Cost Savings % Identified (%) Average of Payback Period Actual (yr) Excessive valve friction loss all of the time8311,6290.2$55, Less than optimal equipment for the application587,6110.2$42, More flow than required to meet system requirements 506,1610.3$35, Excessive valve friction loss part of the time3110,1140.3$56, Excessive recirculation267,0120.3$40, Degraded equipment performance156,2420.6$44, Unneeded flow path93,0880.1$20, Change time of use77,3140.2$52, Excessive friction loss due to system design48,5890.3$51, System specs exceed system requirements47,8430.2$51, * Based on Save Energy Now assessments conducted between 2006 to Numbers are as of July 1, TOP TEN FREQUENTLY IDENTIFIED PUMPING SYSTEM OPPORTUNITIES SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENTS to 2011

19 19 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Top Ten Frequently Identified Fan Opportunities (ESAs to 2011) No. of Times Identified Average Energy MMBtu Savings Identified (Source) Average Source Energy Savings % Identified (%) Average Energy Cost Savings Identified ($) Average Energy Cost Savings % Identified (%) Average of Payback Period Actual (yr) Use Variable Speed Drive8012,8920.2$72, Install new appropriately sized fan3420,8910.7$131, Shut off unneeded fans1818,9751.2$125, Change belt drive ratio182,8510.3$15, Install new appropriately sized impeller1624,4300.5$117, Improve arrangement of air intake58,2370.1$48, Reconfigure pollution control equipment517,3931.1$112, Recover heat from exhaust air495,3842.6$588, Rearrange ductwork at fan inlet or discharge382,3870.7$300, De-tip fan blades22,0930.1$10, * Based on Save Energy Now assessments conducted between 2006 to Numbers are as of July 1, TOP TEN FREQUENTLY IDENTIFIED FAN SYSTEM OPPORTUNITIES SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENTS to 2011

20 20 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Majority of Assessments Conducted In 6 Major Industries

21 21 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov TOP TEN FREQUENTLY IDENTIFIED OPPORTUNITIES FOR IRON & STEEL INDUSTRY 2006 to 2011 Top Ten Frequently Identified Opportunities for Iron & Steel Industry (ESAs to 2011) No. of Times Identified Average Energy MMBtu Savings Identified (Source) Average Source Energy Savings % Identified (%) Average Energy Cost Savings Identified ($) Average Energy Cost Savings % Identified (%) Average of Payback Period Actual (yr) Reduce oxygen content of flue (exhaust) gases5433,7441.5$274, Use of flue or Exhaust gas heat for combustion air preheating 43134,7806.5$798, Proper insulation and maintenance of furnace structure or parts 3541,1530.6$317, Reduce-eliminate openings and air leakage in the furnace 2822,4881.2$174, Load or charge preheating using heat from flue or exhaust gas or other source of waste heat 2338,5221.8$316, Furnace scheduling, loading, shut down - avoiding delays, waits, cooling between operations etc. 2354,7822.5$489, Improve End Use Efficiency203,1690.2$14, Use of proper heating methods - replace inefficient and uneconomical methods with economical/efficient system 19165, $549, Improve Insulation1625,1380.2$209, Reduce Steam Demand by Changing the Process Steam Requirements 14101,8070.7$479, * Based on Save Energy Now assessments conducted between 2006 to Numbers are as of July 1, 2011.

22 22 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Top Ten Frequently Identified Opportunities for Chemical Industry (ESAs to 2011) No. of Times Identified Average Energy MMBtu Savings Identified (Source) Average Source Energy Savings % Identified (%) Average Energy Cost Savings Identified ($) Average Energy Cost Savings % Identified (%) Average of Payback Period Actual (yr) Reduce Steam Demand by Changing the Process Steam Requirements 73143,7512.2$716, Change Boiler Efficiency7121,1301.0$230, Improve Insulation5425,3020.6$173, Implement Steam Trap Maintenance Program4734,0000.7$264, Implement Steam Leak Maintenance Program4010,3410.3$53, Add or Modify Operation of Backpressure Steam Turbine 39122,7781.7$719, Change Condensate Recovery Rates3853,5790.9$335, Reduce oxygen content of flue (exhaust) gases3112,9010.7$105, Modify Feedwater Heat Recovery Exchanger using Boiler Blowdown 2726,3530.4$191, Use of flue or Exhaust gas heat for combustion air preheating 1936,2541.3$226, * Based on Save Energy Now assessments conducted between 2006 to Numbers are as of July 1, TOP TEN FREQUENTLY IDENTIFIED OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHEMICAL INDUSTRY 2006 to 2011

23 23 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Top Ten Frequently Identified Opportunities for Pulp & Paper Industry (ESAs to 2011) No. of Times Identified Average Energy MMBtu Savings Identified (Source) Average Source Energy Savings % Identified (%) Average Energy Cost Savings Identified ($) Average Energy Cost Savings % Identified (%) Average of Payback Period Actual (yr) Reduce Steam Demand by Changing the Process Steam Requirements 8197,2522.0$646, Change Boiler Efficiency7456,8511.2$385, Change operating parameters5750,4940.5$343, Improve Insulation488,1250.4$60, Excessive valve friction loss all of the time454,5940.2$23, Add or Modify Operation of Backpressure Steam Turbine 3446,5850.6$570, Change Condensate Recovery Rates2924,7220.5$207, Implement Steam Trap Maintenance Program2612,3550.2$78, Reduce or Recover Vented Steam2515,2550.3$135, Install more energy-efficient equipment2513,2490.2$89, * Based on Save Energy Now assessments conducted between 2006 to Numbers are as of July 1, TOP TEN FREQUENTLY IDENTIFIED OPPORTUNITIES FOR PULP & PAPER INDUSTRY 2006 to 2011

24 24 | Industrial Energy Efficiencyeere.energy.gov Compressed Air (Dr. Kissock) Process Heating (Dr. Muller) System-Assessment Examples


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