Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

13.1 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited 2009. Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Chapter.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "13.1 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited 2009. Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Chapter."— Presentation transcript:

1 13.1 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Chapter 13 Capital Budgeting Techniques

2 13.2 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. After Studying Chapter 13, you should be able to: 1. Understand the payback period (PBP) method of project evaluation and selection, including its: (a) calculation; (b) acceptance criterion; (c) advantages and disadvantages; and (d) focus on liquidity rather than profitability. 2. Understand the three major discounted cash flow (DCF) methods of project evaluation and selection – internal rate of return (IRR), net present value (NPV), and profitability index (PI). 3. Explain the calculation, acceptance criterion, and advantages (over the PBP method) for each of the three major DCF methods. 4. Define, construct, and interpret a graph called an “NPV profile.” 5. Understand why ranking project proposals on the basis of IRR, NPV, and PI methods “may” lead to conflicts in rankings. 6. Describe the situations where ranking projects may be necessary and justify when to use either IRR, NPV, or PI rankings. 7. Understand how “sensitivity analysis” allows us to challenge the single- point input estimates used in traditional capital budgeting analysis. 8. Explain the role and process of project monitoring, including “progress reviews” and “post-completion audits.”

3 13.3 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Capital Budgeting Techniques Project Evaluation and Selection Potential Difficulties Capital Rationing Project Monitoring Post-Completion Audit Project Evaluation and Selection Potential Difficulties Capital Rationing Project Monitoring Post-Completion Audit

4 13.4 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Project Evaluation: Alternative Methods Simple Method Payback Period (PBP) Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) Method Internal Rate of Return (IRR) Net Present Value (NPV) Profitability Index (PI) Refer to the additional PowerPoint slides and the Excel spreadsheet “VW13E-13b.xlsx” for computer-based solutions. Simple Method Payback Period (PBP) Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) Method Internal Rate of Return (IRR) Net Present Value (NPV) Profitability Index (PI) Refer to the additional PowerPoint slides and the Excel spreadsheet “VW13E-13b.xlsx” for computer-based solutions.

5 13.5 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Proposed Project Data Julie Miller is evaluating a new project for her firm, Basket Wonders (BW). She has determined that the after-tax cash flows for the project will be $10,000; $12,000; $15,000; $10,000; and $7,000, respectively, for each of the Years 1 through 5. The initial cash outlay will be $40,000.

6 13.6 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Payback Period (PBP) PBP PBP is the period of time required for the cumulative expected cash flows from an investment project to equal the initial cash outflow –40 K 10 K 12 K 15 K 10 K 7 K

7 13.7 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Payback Period YearCash FlowsCumulative Inflows 0(40,000) , ,00022, ,00037, ,00047,000 57,00054,000

8 13.8 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Payback Period Solution(#1) u 1) 40,000 – 37,000 = 3,000 u 2) 3,000 / 10,000 = 0.3 u 3) 0.3 x 12 = 3.6 u 4) 0.6 x 30 = 18 u The payback period is 3 years and 3 monthes and 18 days

9 13.9 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. (c) 10 K 22 K 37 K 47 K 54 K Payback Solution (#2) Another Method PBP 3.3 Years PBP = a + ( b – c ) / d = 3 + (40 – 37) / 10 = 3 + (3) / 10 = 3.3 Years –40 K 10 K 12 K 15 K 10 K 7 K Cumulative Inflows (a) (-b) (d)

10 13.10 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Payback Solution (#3) PBP 3.3 Years PBP = 3 + ( 3K ) / 10K = 3.3 Years Note: Take absolute value of last negative cumulative cash flow value. PBP 3.3 Years PBP = 3 + ( 3K ) / 10K = 3.3 Years Note: Take absolute value of last negative cumulative cash flow value. Cumulative Cash Flows –40 K 10 K 12 K 15 K 10 K 7 K –40 K –30 K –18 K –3 K 7 K 14 K

11 13.11 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. PBP Acceptance Criterion Yes! The firm will receive back the initial cash outlay in less than 3.5 years. [3.3 Years < 3.5 Year Max.] The management of Basket Wonders has set a maximum PBP of 3.5 years for projects of this type. Should this project be accepted?

12 13.12 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Payback Period (Equal Cash Inflow) u If we assume for the same example the cash outflow is $40,000 and the inflow will be $15,000 each year, what is the payback period?

13 13.13 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Payback Period (PBP)(Solution) u Payback period = Cash outflow/ Annual Cash inflow u $40,000 / 15,000 = 2.67 u 0.67 x 12 = 8.04 u 0.04 x 30 = 1.2 u The (PBP) is 2 years and 8 month

14 13.14 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. PBP Strengths and Weaknesses Strengths: Easy to use and understand Can be used as a measure of liquidity Easier to forecast ST than LT flows Strengths: Easy to use and understand Can be used as a measure of liquidity Easier to forecast ST than LT flows Weaknesses: Does not account for TVM Does not consider cash flows beyond the PBP Cutoff period is subjective

15 13.15 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Internal Rate of Return (IRR) IRR is the discount rate that equates the present value of the future net cash flows from an investment project with the project’s initial cash outflow (ICO). CF 1 CF 2 CF n (1 + IRR) 1 (1 + IRR) 2 (1 + IRR) n ICO =

16 13.16 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. $15,000 $10,000 $7,000 IRR Solution $10,000 $12,000 (1+IRR) 1 (1+IRR) 2 Find the interest rate (IRR) that causes the discounted cash flows to equal $40, $40,000 = (1+IRR) 3 (1+IRR) 4 (1+IRR) 5

17 13.17 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. IRR Solution (Try 10%) $40,000 $40,000 = $10,000(PVIF 10%,1 ) + $12,000(PVIF 10%,2 ) + $15,000(PVIF 10%,3 ) + $10,000(PVIF 10%,4 ) + $ 7,000(PVIF 10%,5 ) $40,000 $40,000 = $10,000(0.909) + $12,000(0.826) + $15,000(0.751) + $10,000(0.683) + $ 7,000(0.621) $40,000 $41,444[Rate is too low!!] $40,000 = $9,090 + $9,912 + $11,265 + $6,830 + $4,347 =$41,444[Rate is too low!!]

18 13.18 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. IRR Solution (Try 10% ) YearNet Cash Flows PVIF 10%Present Value 110, , , , , , , ,830 57, ,347 Total Present Value 41,444

19 13.19 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. IRR Solution (Try 15%) $40,000 $40,000 = $10,000(PVIF 15%,1 ) + $12,000(PVIF 15%,2 ) + $15,000(PVIF 15%,3 ) + $10,000(PVIF 15%,4 ) + $ 7,000(PVIF 15%,5 ) $40,000 $40,000 = $10,000(0.870) + $12,000(0.756) + $15,000(0.658) + $10,000(0.572) + $ 7,000(0.497) $40,000 $36,841[Rate is too high!!] $40,000 = $8,700 + $9,072 + $9,870 + $5,720 + $3,479 =$36,841[Rate is too high!!]

20 13.20 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. IRR Solution (Try 15%) YearNet Cash Flows PVIF 15%Present Value 110, , , , , , , ,720 57, ,479 Total Present Value 36,841

21 13.21 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. 0.10$41, IRR$40,000 $4, $36,841 X$1, $4,603 IRR Solution (Interpolate) $1,444 X =

22 13.22 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. 0.10$41, IRR$40,000 $4, $36,841 X$1, $4,603 IRR Solution (Interpolate) $1,444 X =

23 13.23 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. 0.10$41, IRR$40,000 $4, $36,841 ($1,444)(0.05) $4,603 IRR Solution (Interpolate) $1,444 X X =X = IRR = = or 11.57%

24 13.24 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. IRR Acceptance Criterion No! The firm will receive 11.57% for each dollar invested in this project at a cost of 13%. [ IRR < required Rate ] The management of Basket Wonders has determined that the required rate is 13% for projects of this type. Should this project be accepted?

25 13.25 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. IRRs on the Calculator We will use the cash flow registry to solve the IRR for this problem quickly and accurately!

26 13.26 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Actual IRR Solution Using Your Financial Calculator Steps in the Process Step 1:PressCF key Step 2:Press2 nd CLR Workkeys Step 3: For CF0 Press Enter  keys Step 4: For C01 Press10000 Enter  keys Step 5: For F01 Press 1 Enter  keys Step 6: For C02 Press12000 Enter  keys Step 7: For F02 Press 1 Enter  keys Step 8: For C03 Press15000 Enter  keys Step 9: For F03 Press 1 Enter  keys

27 13.27 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Actual IRR Solution Using Your Financial Calculator Steps in the Process (Part II) Step 10:For C04 Press10000 Enter  keys Step 11:For F04 Press 1 Enter  keys Step 12:For C05 Press 7000 Enter  keys Step 13:For F05 Press 1 Enter  keys Step 14: Press   keys Step 15: PressIRR key Step 16: PressCPT key Result:Internal Rate of Return = 11.47%

28 13.28 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. IRR Strengths and Weaknesses Strengths: Strengths: Accounts for TVM Considers all cash flows Less subjectivity Strengths: Strengths: Accounts for TVM Considers all cash flows Less subjectivity Weaknesses: Assumes all cash flows reinvested at the IRR Difficulties with project rankings and Multiple IRRs

29 13.29 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Net Present Value (NPV) NPV is the present value of an investment project’s net cash flows minus the project’s initial cash outflow (ICO). CF 1 CF 2 CF n (1+k) 1 (1+k) 2 (1+k) n ICO - ICO NPV =

30 13.30 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Basket Wonders has determined that the appropriate discount rate (k) for this project is 13%. $10,000 $7,000 NPV Solution $10,000 $12,000 $15,000 (1.13) 1 (1.13) 2 (1.13) $40,000 - $40,000 (1.13) 4 (1.13) 5 NPV NPV = +

31 13.31 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. NPV Solution NPV $40,000 NPV = $10,000(PVIF 13%,1 ) + $12,000(PVIF 13%,2 ) + $15,000(PVIF 13%,3 ) + $10,000(PVIF 13%,4 ) + $ 7,000(PVIF 13%,5 ) – $40,000 NPV $40,000 NPV = $10,000(0.885) + $12,000(0.783) + $15,000(0.693) + $10,000(0.613) + $ 7,000(0.543) – $40,000 NPV $40,000 NPV = $8,850 + $9,396 + $10,395 + $6,130 + $3,801 – $40,000 $1,428 =- $1,428

32 13.32 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. NPV Solution (Another Method) YearCash FlowsPVIF 13%Present Value 110, , , , , , , ,130 57, ,801 Total PV38,573 Cash outflow40,000 Net PV(1,427)

33 13.33 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. NPV Acceptance Criterion Reject NPV0 No! The NPV is negative. This means that the project is reducing shareholder wealth. [Reject as NPV < 0 ] The management of Basket Wonders has determined that the required rate is 13% for projects of this type. Should this project be accepted?

34 13.34 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. NPV on the Calculator We will use the cash flow registry to solve the NPV for this problem quickly and accurately! Hint: If you have not cleared the cash flows from your calculator, then you may skip to Step 15.

35 13.35 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Actual NPV Solution Using Your Financial Calculator Steps in the Process Step 1:PressCF key Step 2:Press2 nd CLR Workkeys Step 3: For CF0 Press Enter  keys Step 4: For C01 Press10000 Enter  keys Step 5: For F01 Press 1 Enter  keys Step 6: For C02 Press12000 Enter  keys Step 7: For F02 Press 1 Enter  keys Step 8: For C03 Press15000 Enter  keys Step 9: For F03 Press 1 Enter  keys

36 13.36 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Steps in the Process (Part II) Step 10:For C04 Press10000 Enter  keys Step 11:For F04 Press 1 Enter  keys Step 12:For C05 Press 7000 Enter  keys Step 13:For F05 Press 1 Enter  keys Step 14: Press   keys Step 15: PressNPV key Step 16: For I=, Enter13Enter  keys Step 17: PressCPT key Result:Net Present Value = -$1, Actual NPV Solution Using Your Financial Calculator

37 13.37 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. NPV Strengths and Weaknesses Strengths: Cash flows assumed to be reinvested at the required rate. Accounts for TVM. Considers all cash flows. Strengths: Cash flows assumed to be reinvested at the required rate. Accounts for TVM. Considers all cash flows. Weaknesses: May not include managerial options embedded in the project. See Chapter 14.

38 13.38 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Net Present Value Profile Discount Rate (%) IRR Sum of CF’sPlot NPV for each discount rate. Three of these points are easy now! Net Present Value $000s

39 13.39 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Creating NPV Profiles Using the Calculator Hint: As long as you do not “clear” the cash flows from the registry, simply start at Step 15 and enter a different discount rate. Each resulting NPV will provide a “point” for your NPV Profile!

40 13.40 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Profitability Index (PI) PI is the ratio of the present value of a project’s future net cash flows to the project’s initial cash outflow. CF 1 CF 2 CF n (1+k) 1 (1+k) 2 (1+k) n ICOPI = Method #1:

41 13.41 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. PI Acceptance Criterion PI Reject PI1.00 No! The PI is less than This means that the project is not profitable. [Reject as PI < 1.00 ] PI PI = $38,573 / $40,000 =.9643 (Method #1, previous slide) Should this project be accepted?

42 13.42 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. PI Strengths and Weaknesses Strengths: Strengths: Same as NPV Allows comparison of different scale projects Strengths: Strengths: Same as NPV Allows comparison of different scale projects Weaknesses: Same as NPV Provides only relative profitability Potential Ranking Problems

43 13.43 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Evaluation Summary Basket Wonders Independent Project

44 13.44 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Project Evaluation: Remember Chapter 12 ‘New Asset’ project? We will start with the cash flows of the project and also calculate the cumulative cash flow values. We can use Excel functions / approaches to calculate each of the following methods from the above cash flows.

45 13.45 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Independent Project IndependentIndependent – A project whose acceptance (or rejection) does not prevent the acceptance of other projects under consideration. For this project, assume that it is independent of any other potential projects that Basket Wonders may undertake.

46 13.46 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Other Project Relationships Mutually ExclusiveMutually Exclusive – A project whose acceptance precludes the acceptance of one or more alternative projects. DependentDependent – A project whose acceptance depends on the acceptance of one or more other projects.

47 13.47 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Potential Problems Under Mutual Exclusivity A. Scale of Investment B. Cash-flow Pattern C. Project Life A. Scale of Investment B. Cash-flow Pattern C. Project Life Ranking of project proposals may create contradictory results.

48 13.48 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. A. Scale Differences Compare a small (S) and a large (L) project. NET CASH FLOWS Project S Project LEND OF YEAR 0 -$100 -$100, $400 $156,250

49 13.49 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. A. Scale Differences Calculate the PBP, IRR, and Which project is preferred? Why? Project IRR NPV PI S 100% $ L 25% $29, S 100% $ L 25% $29,

50 13.50 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. A. Scale Differences Refer to VW13E-13b.xlsx on the ‘Scale’ tab. Remember to refer to Excel spreadsheet ‘VW13E-13b.xlsx’ and the ‘Scale’ tab.

51 13.51 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. B. Cash Flow Pattern Let us compare a decreasing cash-flow (D) project and an increasing cash-flow (I) project. NET CASH FLOWS Project D Project IEND OF YEAR 0 -$1,200 -$1, , ,080

52 13.52 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. $ D 23% $ $ I 17% $ $ D 23% $ $ I 17% $ Cash Flow Pattern Calculate the IRR, and Which project is preferred? Project IRR NPV PI

53 13.53 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Examine NPV Profiles Discount Rate (%) IRR Plot NPV for each project at various discount rates. Net Present Value ($) Project I Project D

54 13.54 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Fisher’s Rate of Intersection Discount Rate ($) Net Present Value ($) At k<10%, I is best! Fisher’s Rate of Intersection At k>10%, D is best!

55 13.55 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. B. Cash Flow Pattern Refer to VW13E-13b.xlsx on the ‘Pattern’ tab. Remember to refer to Excel spreadsheet ‘VW13E-13b.xlsx’ and the ‘Pattern’ tab.

56 13.56 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. C. Project Life Differences Let us compare a long life (X) project and a short life (Y) project. NET CASH FLOWS Project X Project YEND OF YEAR 0 -$1,000 -$1, , ,375 0

57 13.57 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. X 50% $1, Y 100% $ X 50% $1, Y 100% $ Project Life Differences Calculate the PBP, IRR, and Which project is preferred? Why? Project IRR NPV PI

58 13.58 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. C. Project Life Differences Remember to refer to Excel spreadsheet ‘VW13E-13b.xlsx’ and the ‘Life’ tab.

59 13.59 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Another Way to Look at Things NOT 1.Adjust cash flows to a common terminal year if project “Y” will NOT be replaced. Compound Project Y, Year for 2 years. Year CF –$1,000 $0 $0 $2,420 Results:IRR* = 34.26%NPV = $818 *Lower IRR from adjusted cash-flow stream. X is still Best.

60 13.60 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Replacing Projects with Identical Projects 2. Use Replacement Chain Approach (Appendix B) when project “Y” will be replaced –$1,000 $2,000 –1,000 $2,000 –1,000 $2,000 –$1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $2,000 NPV*$2, Results:IRR = 100% NPV* = $2, Y is Best *Higher NPV, but the same IRR. Y is Best.

61 13.61 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. C. Project Life Differences Remember to refer to Excel spreadsheet ‘VW13E-13b.xlsx’ and the ‘Life2’ tab.

62 13.62 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Capital Rationing Capital Rationing occurs when a constraint (or budget ceiling) is placed on the total size of capital expenditures during a particular period. Example: Julie Miller must determine what investment opportunities to undertake for Basket Wonders (BW). She is limited to a maximum expenditure of $32,500 only for this capital budgeting period.

63 13.63 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Available Projects for BW Project ICO IRR NPV PI A $ % $ B 5, , C 5, , D 7, , E12, F15, , G17, , H25, ,

64 13.64 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Choosing by IRRs for BW Project ICO IRR NPV PI C $ 5,00037% $ 5, F15, , E12, B 5, , Projects C, F, and E have the three largest IRRs. The resulting increase in shareholder wealth is $27,000 with a $32,500 outlay.

65 13.65 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Choosing by NPVs for BW Project ICO IRR NPV PI F $15,000 28% $21, G17, , B 5, , Projects F and G have the two largest NPVs. The resulting increase in shareholder wealth is $28,500 with a $32,500 outlay.

66 13.66 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Choosing by PIs for BW Project ICO IRR NPV PI F $15,000 28% $21, B 5, , C 5, , D 7, , G 17, , Projects F, B, C, and D have the four largest PIs. The resulting increase in shareholder wealth is $38,000 with a $32,500 outlay.

67 13.67 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Summary of Comparison Method Projects Accepted Value Added PI F, B, C, and D $38,000 NPV F and G $28,500 IRRC, F, and E $27,000 PIgreatest increase shareholder wealth PI generates the greatest increase in shareholder wealth when a limited capital budget exists for a single period.

68 13.68 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Single-Point Estimate and Sensitivity Analysis Allows us to change from “single-point” (i.e., revenue, installation cost, salvage, etc.) estimates to a “what if” analysis Utilize a “base-case” to compare the impact of individual variable changes E.g., Change forecasted sales units to see impact on the project’s NPV Allows us to change from “single-point” (i.e., revenue, installation cost, salvage, etc.) estimates to a “what if” analysis Utilize a “base-case” to compare the impact of individual variable changes E.g., Change forecasted sales units to see impact on the project’s NPV Sensitivity Analysis Sensitivity Analysis: A type of “what-if” uncertainty analysis in which variables or assumptions are changed from a base case in order to determine their impact on a project’s measured results (such as NPV or IRR).

69 13.69 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Post-Completion Audit Post-completion Audit A formal comparison of the actual costs and benefits of a project with original estimates. Identify any project weaknesses Develop a possible set of corrective actions Provide appropriate feedback Result: Making better future decisions!

70 13.70 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Multiple IRR Problem* Two!! Two!! There are as many potential IRRs as there are sign changes. Let us assume the following cash flow pattern for a project for Years 0 to 4: –$100 +$100 +$900 –$1,000 How many potential IRRs could this project have? * Refer to Appendix A

71 13.71 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. NPV Profile – Multiple IRRs Discount Rate (%) Net Present Value ($000s) Multiple IRRs at k 12.95%191.15% k = 12.95% and % –100

72 13.72 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. NPV Profile – Multiple IRRs Hint: Your calculator will only find ONE IRR – even if there are multiple IRRs. It will give you the lowest IRR. In this case, 12.95%.


Download ppt "13.1 Van Horne and Wachowicz, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 13th edition. © Pearson Education Limited 2009. Created by Gregory Kuhlemeyer. Chapter."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google