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Financial and Managerial Accounting John J. Wild Third Edition John J. Wild Third Edition McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2009 by The McGraw-Hill Companies,

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Presentation on theme: "Financial and Managerial Accounting John J. Wild Third Edition John J. Wild Third Edition McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2009 by The McGraw-Hill Companies,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Financial and Managerial Accounting John J. Wild Third Edition John J. Wild Third Edition McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2009 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

2 Chapter 24 Capital Budgeting & Investment Analysis

3 24-3 Conceptual Learning Objectives C1: Explain the importance of capital budgeting. C2: Describe the selection of a hurdle rate for an investment.

4 24-4 A1: Analyze a capital investment project using break-even time. Analytical Learning Objectives

5 24-5 P1: Compute payback period and describe its use. P2: Compute accounting rate of return and explain its use. P3: Compute net present value and explain its use. P4: Compute internal rate of return and explain its use. Procedural Learning Objectives

6 24-6 Capital budgeting: Analyzing alternative long- term investments and deciding which assets to acquire or sell.  Outcome is uncertain.  Large amounts of money are usually involved.  Investment involves a long-term commitment.  Decision may be difficult or impossible to reverse. Capital Budgeting C 1

7 24-7 Payback period = Cost of Investment Annual Net Cash Flow Payback Period The payback period of an investment is the time expected to recover the initial investment amount. Managers prefer investing in projects with shorter payback periods. P1

8 24-8 FasTrac is considering buying a new machine that will be used in its manufacturing operations. The machine costs $16,000 and is expected to produce annual net cash flows of $4,100. The machine is expected to have an 8-year useful life with no salvage value. Calculate the payback period. Payback period = Cost of Investment Annual Net Cash Flow Payback period = $16,000 $4,100 = 3.9 years Payback Period with Even Cash Flows P1

9 24-9 In the previous example, we assumed that the increase in cash flows would be the same each year. Now, let’s look at an example where the cash flows vary each year. $4,100 $5,000 Payback Period with Uneven Cash Flows P1

10 24-10 FasTrac wants to install a machine that costs $16,000 and has an 8-year useful life with zero salvage value. Annual net cash flows are: P1 Payback Period with Uneven Cash Flows

11 We recover the $16,000 purchase price between years 4 and 5, about 4.2 years for the payback period. P1 Payback Period with Uneven Cash Flows

12 24-12 Ignores the time value of money. Ignores cash flows after the payback period. Unacceptable for projects with long lives where time value of money effects are major. Using the Payback Period P1

13 24-13 Consider two projects, each with a five-year life and each costing $6,000. Would you invest in Project One just because it has a shorter payback period? Using the Payback Period P1

14 24-14 The accounting rate of return focuses on annual income instead of cash flows. Accounting Rate of Return Accounting Annual after-tax net income rate of return Annual average investment = Beginning book value + Ending book value 2 P2

15 24-15 Accounting Annual after-tax net income rate of return Annual average investment = Reconsider the $16,000 investment being considered by FasTrac. The annual after-tax net income is $2,100. Compute the accounting rate of return. Beginning book value + Ending book value 2 Accounting Rate of Return P2

16 24-16 Accounting Annual after-tax net income rate of return Annual average investment = Reconsider the $16,000 investment being considered by FasTrac. The annual after-tax net income is $2,100. Compute the accounting rate of return. Accounting Rate of Return Beginning book value + Ending book value 2 P2

17 24-17 Accounting $2,100 rate of return $8,000 == 26.25% $16,000 + $0 2 Accounting Rate of Return Reconsider the $16,000 investment being considered by FasTrac. The annual after-tax net income is $2,100. Compute the accounting rate of return. P2

18 24-18 Depreciation may be calculated several ways. Income may vary from year to year. Time value of money is ignored. So why would I ever want to use this method anyway? Using Accounting Rate of Return P2

19 24-19 Now let’s look at a capital budgeting model that considers the time value of cash flows. Net Present Value P3

20 24-20  Discount the future net cash flows from the investment at the required rate of return.  Subtract the initial amount invested from sum of the discounted cash flows. FasTrac is considering the purchase of a conveyor costing $16,000 with an 8-year useful life with zero salvage value that promises annual net cash flows of $4,100. FasTrac requires a 12 percent compounded annual return on its investments. Net Present Value P3

21 24-21 Net Present Value with Even Cash Flows P3

22 24-22 Present value factors for 12 percent Net Present Value with Even Cash Flows P3

23 24-23 A positive net present value indicates that this project earns more than 12 percent on the investment. Net Present Value with Even Cash Flows P3

24 24-24 General decision rule... Using Net Present Value P3

25 24-25 Although all projects require the same investment and have the same total net cash flows, project B has a higher net present value because of a larger net cash flow in year 1. Net Present Value with Uneven Cash Flows P3

26 24-26 Internal Rate of Return (IRR) The interest rate that makes... Present value of cash inflows Present value of cash outflows =   The net present value equal zero. P4

27 24-27 Projects with even annual cash flows Project life = 3 years Initial cost = $12,000 Annual net cash inflows = $5,000 Determine the IRR for this project. 1. Compute present value factor. 2.Using present value of annuity table... P4 Internal Rate of Return (IRR)

28 Compute present value factor. $12,000 ÷ $5,000 per year = Using present value of annuity table... Projects with even annual cash flows Project life = 3 years Initial cost = $12,000 Annual net cash inflows = $5,000 Determine the IRR for this project. P4 Internal Rate of Return (IRR)

29 24-29 Locate the row whose number equals the periods in the project’s life. 1.Determine the present value factor. $12,000 ÷ $5,000 per year = Using present value of annuity table... P4 Internal Rate of Return (IRR)

30 24-30 In that row, locate the interest factor closest in amount to the present value factor. 1.Determine the present value factor. $12,000 ÷ $5,000 per year = Using present value of annuity table... P4 Internal Rate of Return (IRR)

31 Determine the present value factor. $12,000 ÷ $5,000 per year = Using present value of annuity table... IRR is the interest rate of the column in which the present value factor is found. IRR is approximately 12%. P4 Internal Rate of Return (IRR)

32 24-32 If cash inflows are unequal, trial and error solution will result if present value tables are used. Sophisticated business calculators and electronic spreadsheets can be used to easily solve these problems. Internal Rate of Return – Uneven Cash Flows P4

33 24-33 Internal Rate of Return l Compare the internal rate of return on a project to a predetermined hurdle rate (cost of capital). l To be acceptable, a project’s rate of return cannot be less than the cost of capital. Using Internal Rate of Return C2

34 24-34 Comparing Methods C2

35 24-35 Break-even time incorporates time value of money into the payback period method of evaluating capital investments. Break-Even Time A1

36 24-36 End of Chapter 24


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