Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Information-Rich Engineering Design (I-RED) Michael Fosmire, Purdue University David Radcliffe, Purdue University

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Information-Rich Engineering Design (I-RED) Michael Fosmire, Purdue University David Radcliffe, Purdue University"— Presentation transcript:

1 Information-Rich Engineering Design (I-RED) Michael Fosmire, Purdue University David Radcliffe, Purdue University ASEE Annual conference, June 2012

2 Overview Investigate some Design Models Propose Integrated IL/Design Model Sample Applications

3 Need: Integrated Model Model recognizable to Engineers and Librarians Co-constructed by both to capture important components of each discipline A bridge to help start conversations and find common ground for collaborations

4 Prior Work: ABET Mapping 3b) Ability to design and conduct experiments 3c) Ability to design a system…to meet desired needs within realistic constraints.’ 3e) Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems 3f) Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility 3h) Understand the impact of engineering in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context 3j) Knowledge of contemporary issues 3i) Recognition of the need for, and ability to engage in lifelong learning -Riley et al; Sapp Nelson+Fosmire

5 Prior Work: ABET Mapping 3b) Ability to design and conduct experiments 3c) Ability to design a system…to meet desired needs within realistic constraints.’ 3e) Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems 3f) Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility 3h) Understand the impact of engineering in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context 3j) Knowledge of contemporary issues 3i) Recognition of the need for, and ability to engage in lifelong learning -Riley et al; Sapp Nelson+Fosmire

6 Engineering Design Central to Discipline of Engineering: “Design is regarded by many as the core problem- solving process of technological development. It is as fundamental to technology as inquiry is to science and reading is to language arts.” - ITEA (2007) Ill-structured problems mirror post-graduation situations, enhance transferability and deep learning

7 Info Gathering and Design -Atman et al, JEE 2007 Consistently find first-year students gather less information than seniors, who gather less than professional engineers. Number of Sources Kinds of Requests (Aspects of Problem) Time Spent Gathering Information

8 Design Models Client Statement (Need) Problem Definition Conceptual Design Preliminary Design Detailed Design Design Communication Final Design (specs+docs) Product -Dym and Little, 2000 “The literature review is so well documented and understood that it might seem unnecessary for us to comment on it here….however, can be both vast and greatly dependent on phase or stage of the design.”

9 “Radcliffe” Design Model Note: Team dynamics Reflection Stages are unique

10 Connection to IL

11 Characteristics of Info Activities

12 Information Activities

13

14

15

16

17

18

19 Implications Resources needed depend on stage of design process Mixture of technical, social, economic, legal resources Metacognitive process threads throughout project Beginning and end focuses on Knowledge Management Can target appropriate stage, or try to integrate throughout design project

20 Applications Provide Context: Design Problem: Provide clean water to a community in Sub-Saharan Africa Activity: 1.Brainstorm: List the assumptions you can make about the community to guide your project. (materials available, budget, culture, local expertise, etc.) 2.Locate information to inform one of your assumptions. 3.Was your assumption correct? What other assumptions from your list do you need to validate?

21 Applications Assess Technologies and Approaches: Design Problem: Provide clean water to a community in Sub-Saharan Africa Activity: 1.Determine ‘success’ factors of a solution (e.g., cost, ease of use, local materials) 2.Locate an appropriate product that could be applied to the problem. What is your assessment of the product? 3.Locate two external sources that evaluate or compare this product (or underlying technology) in a similar situation. 4.What is the assessment of those sources? How has it changed your assessment of the value of your chosen technology?

22 Conclusion Assembling Examples and Approach into Monograph Initiatives at PU Press IL Handbook series Engineering Education series Coming Fall 2013

23 ChpTitle 1 What is Information Literacy Anyway? 2 What Does Engineering Design Entail? 3 Where Do Information and Design intersect? 4 Whose Idea was That and Why Does It Matter? 5 How do Engineers Manage Their Information? 6 Getting Your (Information) Act Together: Developing a Knowledge-Management Strategy 7 Finding the Lay of the Land Understanding the Context 8 Finding Out What Clients Really Need: Understanding the Task 9 Searching Outside Your Box: Taking advantage of prior art 10 We Have a Winner: Evaluating Potential Solutions 11 Making it Real: Finding the most Suitable Materials and Components 12 Making it Safe and Legal: Meeting standards, codes, and regulations 13 Selling Your Solution: Persuading with Integrity 14 Don’t Re-Invent Your Wheel: Capturing Lessons from the Project

24 Thank You Michael Fosmire David Radcliffe Purdue University


Download ppt "Information-Rich Engineering Design (I-RED) Michael Fosmire, Purdue University David Radcliffe, Purdue University"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google