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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR WILLIAM PINDERHUGHES ELEM/MIDDLE FRANK LITTLE, ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL OCTOBER 21, 2009 Composing one common voice! Baltimore.

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Presentation on theme: "PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR WILLIAM PINDERHUGHES ELEM/MIDDLE FRANK LITTLE, ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL OCTOBER 21, 2009 Composing one common voice! Baltimore."— Presentation transcript:

1 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR WILLIAM PINDERHUGHES ELEM/MIDDLE FRANK LITTLE, ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL OCTOBER 21, 2009 Composing one common voice! Baltimore City Public Schools

2 Outcomes By the conclusion of this session participants should be able to compose one “common voice” in order to improve teaching and learning within the Middle School. By the conclusion of this session participants should be able to identify and demonstrate how the “common voice” will increase student achievement.

3 Why is a Common Voice Important?

4 Scenario #1 In Elementary/Middle School X there are a total of 425 students. Of which there are 125 in the middle school specifically. The middle school area historically has scored low of Benchmark and State Testes. Low expectations have been observed in classrooms by administrators. Students have been seen walking in and out of classes without consequence. The middle school administrator has decided to monitor instruction very closely and this is what they saw: Students often work from worksheets and almost never complete them. Students often have idle conversation and when asked what went on in the classroom today, they haven't an answer. There are teachers in the classrooms that are doing quite well however they are becoming frustrated by the lack of control in their colleague's class. Instruction isn't rigorous. Questioning of students do not require students to develop original responses. They are at the lowest level on Bloom's Taxomy What should be done in order for the staff to correct this problem?

5 Clear Expectations Based upon feedback from Scenario #1, these are my findings: Fewer worksheets should be given Start questioning at the “Application Level” of Bloom Taxonomy More Collaboration when planning Real Life Applications should accompany instruction Lesson Plan Reviews

6 What Does Quality Instruction Look Like? Students are engaged (<80%) Adequate Pacing Dialogue between Teacher/Student and Student/Student “Accountable Talk” Appropriate Grade Level Objectives Every lesson should entail discovery or working towards mastery Real World Connections

7 The Lesson Date: October 14, 2009 Unit: # 3 Expressions and Equations Core Learning Goal: Concept/Skill: Writing Expressions Objective: Indicator The student will write expressions for real-world problems by applying addition, subtraction, multiplication, and/or division to algebraic expressions. Entry Activity/Warm-up: Review of previous skill Diamond found a t-shirt of her favorite hi-hop artist for a cost of 2x. The store is having a sale that day for 15% off any merchandise. Write an expression that shows the total cost of her shirt. Homework/Assessment Check: Corrections and Feedback Sequence project- correction find common difference in each table before deciding type of sequence Vocabulary/ Key and Clarifying Concepts: Variable, constant, coefficient, algebraic expression, equation, term, percent Algebra – translating written words into numbers and symbols; Division is expressed by a fraction bar; x is the unknown and y is the total, When solving problems involving expressions write a number sentence and substitute numbers for expression. Procedures: Motivation (Concept Development): Real-world problem, investigation, introduction, pre-requisite skills John needs wants to put fence around half his yard. His yard is a perfect square. He needs to know how many feet of fence to buy to go around that portion of the yard (perimeter). John takes a piece of paper to represent his yard. He folds it exactly in half to represent the portion he wants fenced in. Label the dimensions (length by width) as an expression. Student s have a piece of paper in shape of square that they will fold in half to determine the length in comparison to the width. (Should be x and 2x or ½ x and x). Guided Learning: Modeling (I do)/ Guided (We do)/ Independent practice (You do) Model: Use problem above to show how to write expressions with operations: What does John need to find out? How do we find the perimeter of an object? What are all the sides? Let’s write an expression to show perimeter.( x +2x + x + 2x) Explain to students that when using addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division of expression, use operation and replace numbers with expression. Use another example: Ms. Johnson has $2,500 in savings, Mr. Johnson has $3,005 in savings. How much do they have in total? Students write a number sentence Replace amount with expressions: Ms. Johnson has 5x in savings, Mr. Johnson has 6x +5 in savings. How much do they have in total? Students write a number sentence replacing numbers with expression (5x) + (6x +5) Guided Practice: provide several examples of problems – in which students write expressions using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and/or division. Independent Practice: students are given a regular word problem, they must change the numbers to expressions and then write an expression to find represent the answer. Assessment/Summary: Students complete an assessment using several HAS examples. Homework/Extension: Janice has x dollars. Mark has twice as much as Janice. How much money do they have total?

8 Objective Indicator The student will write expressions for real-world problems by applying addition, subtraction, multiplication, and/or division to algebraic expressions

9 The th grade Algebra Class Consist of a total of 20 students (10 boys and 10 girls) The students were selected based upon their MSA Math scores

10 The Entry Entry Motivation Warm Up

11 Dependent Practice This is the part of the lesson where “Explicit Instruction” takes place. Explicit Instruction is characterized by: Intentional teaching of well defined skills or strategies that are broken down and taught directly in a series of carefully sequenced steps Clear and consistent teacher wording OR clear and consistent teacher instructions Dr. Michael Coyne, University of Connecticut

12 Explicit Instruction Continued Explicit Instruction is characterized by: Extensive teacher modeling or demonstration of skills and strategies before students are asked to perform them independently “Thinking aloud” procedures that draw attention to the step-by-step process of applying skills and strategies that is eventually internalized during proficient reading Dr. Michael Coyne, University Connecticut

13 Explicit Instruction I DO: Explain, model, think-aloud WE DO: Student engagement Practice Immediate corrective feedback small, flexible group instruction YOU DO: Independent application

14 Summary The summary of the lesson is just as important and the launch. The way an airplane takes off is just as important as to how it lands, so why should the lesson be any different?

15 Evaluation This is the portion of the lesson where you allow students to display their “discovery” or “mastery.”

16 Reflection/Evaluation Based upon your understanding of the presentation what do you believe the “Common Voice” signify? Based upon your understanding, how is it the “CV” can aid in teaching and learning?


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