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Designed by Education Quality & Enhancement staff at the University of Exeter. Based on work by the Viewpoints project at Ulster University (funded by.

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Presentation on theme: "Designed by Education Quality & Enhancement staff at the University of Exeter. Based on work by the Viewpoints project at Ulster University (funded by."— Presentation transcript:

1 Designed by Education Quality & Enhancement staff at the University of Exeter. Based on work by the Viewpoints project at Ulster University (funded by Jisc).Version th February 2015 RADAR dimensions model for evaluating assessment & feedback The RADAR dimensions model for evaluating assessment & feedback is a thinking tool, designed to help programme and/or module teams reflect on how a current assessment might be ranked against dimensions of good assessment & feedback practice. It is intended to be used alongside nine support cards, which suggest ways in which changes to an assessment might be made for each dimension. This pack includes a set of example sheets showing how the dimensions model is intended to be used in practice. It includes examples of an analysis cycle, a design cycle and the review of a group of assessments that together make up a programme. It also includes a blank sheet for practical use.

2 Designed by Education Quality & Enhancement staff at the University of Exeter. Based on work by the Viewpoints project at Ulster University (funded by Jisc).Version th February 2015 To what extent do learners across your course have opportunities to engage actively with assessment goals, criteria and standards? To what extent do your assessment tasks encourage regular study in and out of class and deep rather than surface learning? To what extent does your practical feedback, and your feedback process, help learners self-assess and self-correct? To what extent do learners have practical ways of acting on feedback? To what extent are there opportunities for feedback dialogue, either peer and/or teacher- learner, around assessment tasks in your course? To what extent are there formal opportunities for reflection, self-assessment or peer assessment in your course? To what extent do learners have choice in the topics, methods, criteria, weighting and/or timing of assessment tasks in your course? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes activate your learners' motivation to learn and be successful? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes inform and shape your teaching? Course: ____________________________________ Year: _______________ Reviewer(s): ______________________________ Date: _________________ RADAR dimensions model for evaluating assessment & feedback Overview The RADAR dimensions model for evaluating assessment & feedback is a thinking tool, designed to help programme and/or module teams reflect on how a current assessment might be marked on the nine dimensions of good assessment & feedback practice. The dimensions model is designed to be used in two stages: 1)An analysis stage to understand how the assessments for a programme and/or module currently map to the dimensions 2)A design stage to discuss how changes to the assessments might create movement along the dimensions Overview The RADAR dimensions model for evaluating assessment & feedback is a thinking tool, designed to help programme and/or module teams reflect on how a current assessment might be marked on the nine dimensions of good assessment & feedback practice. The dimensions model is designed to be used in two stages: 1)An analysis stage to understand how the assessments for a programme and/or module currently map to the dimensions 2)A design stage to discuss how changes to the assessments might create movement along the dimensions Students have an opportunity to influence breakdown of marks for peer assessment Hmmm … don’t do this much. Maybe should try ResponseWare? Single exam not helping here! This model summarises research into good assessment and feedback. It is designed to be a practical tool, when completed it depicts a visualisation of how assessment within an existing module or programme rates against each of the dimensions listed. This then suggests areas of the overall assessment that might be adjusted in order to improve the student experience. EQE101: Academic Development 2014/15

3 Designed by Education Quality & Enhancement staff at the University of Exeter. Based on work by the Viewpoints project at Ulster University (funded by Jisc).Version th February 2015 To what extent do learners across your course have opportunities to engage actively with assessment goals, criteria and standards? To what extent do your assessment tasks encourage regular study in and out of class and deep rather than surface learning? To what extent does your practical feedback, and your feedback process, help learners self-assess and self-correct? To what extent do learners have practical ways of acting on feedback? To what extent are there opportunities for feedback dialogue, either peer and/or teacher- learner, around assessment tasks in your course? To what extent are there formal opportunities for reflection, self-assessment or peer assessment in your course? To what extent do learners have choice in the topics, methods, criteria, weighting and/or timing of assessment tasks in your course? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes activate your learners' motivation to learn and be successful? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes inform and shape your teaching? Course: ____________________________________ Year: _______________ Reviewer(s): ______________________________ Date: _________________ RADAR dimensions model for evaluating assessment & feedback Analysis Stage The analysis stage is an opportunity to think about how the assessments for the module under discussion currently map to the dimensions model. It may well be the case that some aspects of the current assessments are already well developed in terms of these dimensions. The purpose of the tool is to help the team visualise this, and highlight areas which aren’t perhaps as well developed as others. No explicit attempt has been made to quantify the scales of the dimensions. Teams are encouraged to use the boundaries implied by the top and bottom of the scales, together with their interpretation of the best and worst aspects of their current assessments, as overall guides for rating within the model. Analysis Stage The analysis stage is an opportunity to think about how the assessments for the module under discussion currently map to the dimensions model. It may well be the case that some aspects of the current assessments are already well developed in terms of these dimensions. The purpose of the tool is to help the team visualise this, and highlight areas which aren’t perhaps as well developed as others. No explicit attempt has been made to quantify the scales of the dimensions. Teams are encouraged to use the boundaries implied by the top and bottom of the scales, together with their interpretation of the best and worst aspects of their current assessments, as overall guides for rating within the model. This model summarises research into good assessment and feedback. It is designed to be a practical tool, when completed it depicts a visualisation of how assessment within an existing module or programme rates against each of the dimensions listed. This then suggests areas of the overall assessment that might be adjusted in order to improve the student experience. EQE101: Academic Development 2014/15

4 Designed by Education Quality & Enhancement staff at the University of Exeter. Based on work by the Viewpoints project at Ulster University (funded by Jisc).Version th February 2015 To what extent do learners across your course have opportunities to engage actively with assessment goals, criteria and standards? To what extent do your assessment tasks encourage regular study in and out of class and deep rather than surface learning? To what extent does your practical feedback, and your feedback process, help learners self-assess and self-correct? To what extent do learners have practical ways of acting on feedback? To what extent are there opportunities for feedback dialogue, either peer and/or teacher- learner, around assessment tasks in your course? To what extent are there formal opportunities for reflection, self-assessment or peer assessment in your course? To what extent do learners have choice in the topics, methods, criteria, weighting and/or timing of assessment tasks in your course? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes activate your learners' motivation to learn and be successful? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes inform and shape your teaching? Course: ____________________________________ Year: _______________ Reviewer(s): ______________________________ Date: _________________ This model summarises research into good assessment and feedback. It is designed to be a practical tool, when completed it depicts a visualisation of how assessment within an existing module or programme rates against each of the dimensions listed. This then suggests areas of the overall assessment that might be adjusted in order to improve the student experience. RADAR dimensions model for evaluating assessment & feedback Design Stage The design stage is where changes to the assessments are proposed that will create movement along the dimensions. The adding (or potentially removing) of components is discussed that will help to create movement along the dimensions as appropriate. Nine A6 sized cards aligned with each dimension are available which suggest ways in which movement might be achieved, for example the dimension “Clarify good performance” might be enhanced by providing more explicit marking criteria. In addition, digital cards known as the “Tech Trumps” can be used to identify specific digital technologies which have the potential to support a redesigned assessment, for example the use of the Grademark software to structure marking criteria. Design Stage The design stage is where changes to the assessments are proposed that will create movement along the dimensions. The adding (or potentially removing) of components is discussed that will help to create movement along the dimensions as appropriate. Nine A6 sized cards aligned with each dimension are available which suggest ways in which movement might be achieved, for example the dimension “Clarify good performance” might be enhanced by providing more explicit marking criteria. In addition, digital cards known as the “Tech Trumps” can be used to identify specific digital technologies which have the potential to support a redesigned assessment, for example the use of the Grademark software to structure marking criteria. EQE101: Academic Development 2014/15

5 Designed by Education Quality & Enhancement staff at the University of Exeter. Based on work by the Viewpoints project at Ulster University (funded by Jisc).Version th February 2015 To what extent do learners across your course have opportunities to engage actively with assessment goals, criteria and standards? To what extent do your assessment tasks encourage regular study in and out of class and deep rather than surface learning? To what extent does your practical feedback, and your feedback process, help learners self-assess and self-correct? To what extent do learners have practical ways of acting on feedback? To what extent are there opportunities for feedback dialogue, either peer and/or teacher- learner, around assessment tasks in your course? To what extent are there formal opportunities for reflection, self-assessment or peer assessment in your course? To what extent do learners have choice in the topics, methods, criteria, weighting and/or timing of assessment tasks in your course? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes activate your learners' motivation to learn and be successful? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes inform and shape your teaching? Course: ____________________________________ Year: _______________ Reviewer(s): ______________________________ Date: _________________ RADAR dimensions model for evaluating assessment & feedback Programme View By combining separate module analyses for the group of modules that together comprise a programme, a picture of assessment across that programme can be gathered. Potential weaknesses in the overall programme can therefore be visualised, and changes suggested to individual assessments which will address those weaknesses, using the nine support cards to help provide ideas as to what those changes might entail. Programme View By combining separate module analyses for the group of modules that together comprise a programme, a picture of assessment across that programme can be gathered. Potential weaknesses in the overall programme can therefore be visualised, and changes suggested to individual assessments which will address those weaknesses, using the nine support cards to help provide ideas as to what those changes might entail. This model summarises research into good assessment and feedback. It is designed to be a practical tool, when completed it depicts a visualisation of how assessment within an existing module or programme rates against each of the dimensions listed. This then suggests areas of the overall assessment that might be adjusted in order to improve the student experience. EQE101: Academic Development 2014/15 Rich Osborne, Oli Webb

6 Designed by Education Quality & Enhancement staff at the University of Exeter. Based on work by the Viewpoints project at Ulster University (funded by Jisc).Version th February 2015 To what extent do learners across your course have opportunities to engage actively with assessment goals, criteria and standards? To what extent do your assessment tasks encourage regular study in and out of class and deep rather than surface learning? To what extent does your practical feedback, and your feedback process, help learners self-assess and self-correct? RADAR dimensions model for evaluating assessment & feedback To what extent do learners have practical ways of acting on feedback? To what extent are there opportunities for feedback dialogue, either peer and/or teacher- learner, around assessment tasks in your course? To what extent are there formal opportunities for reflection, self-assessment or peer assessment in your course? To what extent do learners have choice in the topics, methods, criteria, weighting and/or timing of assessment tasks in your course? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes activate your learners' motivation to learn and be successful? To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes inform and shape your teaching? Course: ____________________________________ Year: _______________ This model summarises research into good assessment and feedback. It is designed to be a practical tool, when completed it depicts a visualisation of how assessment within an existing module or programme rates against each of the dimensions listed. This then suggests areas of the overall assessment that might be adjusted in order to improve the student experience. Reviewer(s): ______________________________ Date: _________________


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