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"Reform the environment. Stop trying to reform people. They will reform themselves if the environment is right.” ~ Buckminster Fuller Part 3 Creating Classroom.

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Presentation on theme: ""Reform the environment. Stop trying to reform people. They will reform themselves if the environment is right.” ~ Buckminster Fuller Part 3 Creating Classroom."— Presentation transcript:

1 "Reform the environment. Stop trying to reform people. They will reform themselves if the environment is right.” ~ Buckminster Fuller Part 3 Creating Classroom Community: How?

2 … or do we grow old because we stop playing?” ~ Anon. “Do we stop playing because we grow old…

3 Flow Foundations: What is a sense of community? Why create a sense of community in schools? Creating Conditions Intentionality, Balancing Me & We Ownership, Safe & Trusting Environment Positivity Facilitator Knowledge Sequencing and Flow of activities Group Development Processing the Experience Application

4 Artifacts

5 QUESTIONS How do I incorporate sequence and flow activities in my morning meeting to include my new non-English speaking student? (Nicole Hoffman) How can creating a sense of community make the learning environment work all day? How do you promote ownership by students. (Becky Christy) How do we establish a sense of community with newcomer (non-English speaking) ELL’s? Especially in regards to a wider range of cultural perspectives? (Beth Olson)

6 QUESTIONS How could I create a booklet of activities that incorporate bilateral brain break movement using the community building model? (Nancy Seymour & Phillip Edmonds) I have 30 minutes – how do I create a community within a class having issues, without totally replacing the curriculum. (Tim Bakken) How do I incorporate the community building techniques into my core academic class? (e.g. US History) (Jocelyn Lepinski)

7 QUESTIONS How do we integrate conceptual academic language through the use of experiential education activities to foster meaning, espcially targeting our ESL population. (Judy Lesar & Jackie Trevino) How does it look and feel as a participant going through the sequencing of community building? How does it look/feel as facilitator going through the flow of community building? (MaryAnn Klongland) What processing tools can I use/devleop that will be appropriate for a group of students that range from 4 th to 12 th ? (Krista Geier)

8 QUESTIONS I don’t have my own classroom and primarily work with small groups of kids. How do you effectively incorporate these ideas into small groups and what activities lend themselves best to small groups? (Amy Leu) How can I take a simple (familiar) ice melter and progressively add another level of challenge to it to eventually lead into it being at the trust level? (Becky Stoddard) How can I continue to work on building and maintaining a vibrant classroom community for all of my classes for the whole school year? (Noah Edelstein)

9 QUESTIONS How do I build a homeroom community tha tfocuses on a sense of acceptance and belonging with my 7 th grade students from differing socio-economic backgrounds? (Katie Sinkewicz)

10 Review FOUNDATIONS

11 A Framework for Community Building

12 The Container Concept

13 We Have Choices… We have Influence… How can you influence your containers?

14 What is a Sense of Community?

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17 VISION AT PEACE CARING COMPASSIONATE CONFIDENT CONTRIBUTER CREATIVE CRITICAL THINKER EMPATHETIC EMPLOYED FORGIVING GET ALONG W/ OTHERS GOOD COMMUNICATOR GOOD PARENTS GOOD SELF ESTEEM HAPPY HEALTHY HONEST INDEPENDENT INTEGRITY LITERATE LOYAL MOTIVATED PATIENT PERSEVERENCE POSITIVE ATTITUDE PROBLEM SOLVERS PRODUCTIVE CITIZENS RELIABLE RESILIENT RESOURCEFUL RESPECT RESPONSIBLE SELF RESPECT SELF SUFFICIENT SENSE OF HUMOR SUCCESSFUL WELL-INFORMED

18 Supports Learning Fosters a Safe Learning Environment

19 Review FACILITATOR KNOWLEDGE SEQUENCE AND FLOW

20 Two Perspectives on Sequencing 1. Ice Melters 2. Deinhibitizers 3. Trust Activities 4. Problem Solving Initiatives 1. Challenges 1. Getting Acquainted 2. Learning to Trust and Support Each Other 3. Communication Skills 4. Setting Goals 5. Problem Solving and Conflict Resolution 6. Extensions

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23 Review CONDITIONS FOR A SENSE OF COMMUNITY TO DEVELOP

24 Invitational Education – a Container Framework Making time for relationships

25 Empowerment “Me” Social Commitment “We”

26 The central message of the consumer culture in which we live is: You’re the most important thing on earth. You’re the heaviest object in the universe and everything orbits around you. And we’ve enshrined this idea as ‘human nature.’ Not remembering that most people in most places have had other things very near the center of their identity – the tribe, the community, their relationship with the natural world, or the Divine – something that gave them more of a sense of identity not obsessively rooted in themselves Bill McKibbon (Interview aired on May 26, 2007)

27 SOCIAL COMMITMENT: “WE”

28 Social Agreements Puzzle Pieces (school age/youth) Hands All Around (school age/youth) The Being (early school age) Cairns (Youth) Thumball (school age/youth)

29 Rules & Expectations External Enforced Safety Respect General School/Community rules Specific Classroom rules Non-negotiable Always in Place

30 Agreements & Contracts Internal Owned (co-created) Rights Responsibilities Agreed Upon Important to the Group Negotiable Open to Change as Group Evolves

31 Rules vs. Agreements External Enforced Safety Respect Internal Owned (co-created) Rights Responsibilities

32 Rules vs. Agreements General School/Commun ity rules Specific Classroom rules Non-negotiable Always in Place Agreed Upon Important to the Group Negotiable Open to Change as Group Evolves

33 Protocols/Ground Rules for CCC Assume good intentions Ouch/Oops (Spinach in the teeth rule) Right to Pass Be Present Confidentiality

34 The Best Workshop Ever Facilitators Interactive class Creating intentional structures for participation. Creating opportunity/tolerance for movement. Communicating and interacting Homework that is connected and meaningful Work is meaningful and at student level Teachers are facilitators Start on time and ends on time (or early) An agenda

35 The Best Workshop Ever Everyone Take turns to talk Fair and Honest Laugh with people Have fun Use devices during breaks and non-class time Lots of treats

36 The Best Workshop Ever Everyone All about us Move around Single focused conversations Stay focused

37 Conditions for Community to Develop Intentionality Invitational Education Time Balancing Me and We Empowerment Social Agreement Ownership Safe and Trusting Environment Positivity

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39 Focus: Goal Setting

40 The 3 ‘R’s Routines What are some routines you have in your classroom/school? Responsibilities What do you in your classroom/school to engender responsibility toward self and others? Rituals What are some of your family, cultural, or personal rituals? What are some of your school traditions? What is a rite of passage you have experienced?

41 Ownership: The 3 R’s Routines provide consistency and continuity. Responsibilities entail having reasons to give to—or take care of—the community, each other, and oneself. Rituals offer meaning and connection over time.

42 How can we set up the classroom so the students have the maximum ownership? Participation in classroom rule creation Classroom jobs Explicitly teach all routines and expectations (Wong) Small group work Independent tasks Choices

43 Safe Environment Relational Trust

44 Physical/Emotional Safety Physical and verbal violence has to be addressed. Ground rules and social commitments help in establishing boundaries. Instances of harassment, hitting, etc. though, must also be dealt with quickly.

45 Conclusions from Research by Anthony Bryk and Barbara Schneider Schools reporting strong relational trust levels in 1994 were three times more likely to eventually improve in reading and math than those with very weak trust reports. By 1997, schools with strong relational trust reports had a one in two chance of being in the improving group vs. a one in seven chance for schools with very weak relational trust reports. From PowerPoint at Expeditionary Learning Schools Conference, 2010

46 Perhaps Most significantly... Schools with weak relational trust levels in 1994 and 1997 had virtually no chance of showing improvement in either reading or mathematics. From PowerPoint at Expeditionary Learning Schools Conference, 2010

47 Presence of relational trust was more predictive of improvement than.. School size Teacher educational/professional background Percentage of new teachers Average years of teaching experience Racial & ethnic composition of student body Poverty levels Stability of student body Prior school achievement From PowerPoint at Expeditionary Learning Schools Conference, 2010

48 Conditions for Community to Develop Intentionality Invitational Education Time Balancing “Me” and “We” Empowerment (Me) Social Commitment (We) Ownership Focus (goal setting) 3 R’s: Routines, Rituals, Responsibilities

49 Conditions for Community to Develop Safe and Trusting Environment Safe Environment Relational Trust Positivity Nurturing the Positive Positivity Ratio

50 Group Development & Dynamics Facilitator Knowledge

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52 Homework Artifact? Activity? Positivity Ratio: Take the test.http://positivityratio.com/


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