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REPORT Project Title: Research: A Timeline of Key Life Stages/Milestones of Canadians Client: Bram (Website: https://www.elance.com/e/bramw/) Consultant:

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Presentation on theme: "REPORT Project Title: Research: A Timeline of Key Life Stages/Milestones of Canadians Client: Bram (Website: https://www.elance.com/e/bramw/) Consultant:"— Presentation transcript:

1 REPORT Project Title: Research: A Timeline of Key Life Stages/Milestones of Canadians Client: Bram (Website: https://www.elance.com/e/bramw/) Consultant: Emmanuel Ejiogu Date: March 23, 2012

2 Birth First Day of School Move away from Home Life Stages Ages Puberty; Bar/Bat Mitzvah for Canadian Jews* Graduation from High School Graduation from University 25 First Job after Graduation from University 26 First Marriage; Have First Child 29 Most likely to Start a Business Attend Post Graduate School 30 Retire 65 A Timeline of Key Life Stages/Milestones of Canadians * Upon turning 13, a boy is considered an adult under Jewish beliefs. He becomes a “Bar Mitzvah”. Similarly, a girl becomes a Bat Mitzvah, upon turning 12.

3 Sources of Information Life Stages/ Key Milestones Findings (i.e. Ages) Sources/Rationale/Justification First Day of School4http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primary_education#Canada Puberty10 – 17 “The results of this study provide a contemporary description of pubertal development among Canadian youth. Our findings showed the enormous variability in the timing and tempo of puberty, and identified the relative likelihood that boys and girls had entered puberty between the ages of 10 and 17.” Source: Canadian Journal Of Public Health (2007): Patterns and Correlates of Pubertal Development in Canadian Youth: Effects of Family Context: Rubab G. Arim, et al (http://journal.cpha.ca/index.php/cjph) Bar/Bart Mitzvah for Canadian Jews 13 years for boys; 12 years for girls. Move Away from Home 18 “The years after age 18 offer an opportunity for young people to become increasingly independent from their parents. During this period of transition, young people make a wide range of choices about where and with whom they live...” (http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/ x/ /10311-eng.htm) Graduation from High School “By the ages of 18 to 19, the great majority of young people in all provinces had graduated from high school, ranging from 80% or more in Newfoundland and Labrador, Quebec and British Columbia to 68.5% in Nova Scotia.“ (http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/ x/ /article/11360-eng.htm) Graduation from University 25“The median age at graduation of college students in 2006 was about two years less than that of university graduates in 2007, at 22.7 years old and 24.8 years old, respectively.” (http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/ x/ /article/11386-eng.htm)

4 Sources of Information (Continued) Life Stages/ Key Milestones Findings (i.e. Ages) Sources/Rationale/Justification First Job after Graduation from University 26 “The population survivor functions for 1982 and 1986 during the first 18 months after graduation are remarkably similar. After this point the 1986 cohort is more likely to start a real job.” No current data in this regard is available. Accordingly, this research has maintained this statistic. Hence, using the average age for graduation at 25 years found in this research, the average age for Canadians to start their first job after university graduation was taken as 26 years. (Source: The Transition to Work for Canadian University Graduates: Time to First Job, by Julian Betts*, Christopher Ferrall** and Ross Finnie) First Marriage29http://www.ohpe.ca/node/287 Have first child29http://www.ohpe.ca/node/287 Attend Post Graduate School 30 “The average age decreased from 31.5 to 30.9 between 1999 and 2008 at the master’s level and from 33.8 to 33.0 at the doctorate level.” (http://www.ost.uqam.ca/Portals/0/docs/note/OST_Note_23_ang.pdf) Most likely to start a Business “Venture efforts are mainly the initiative of the age group (60.1%).” Venture efforts entail “alone or with others, take steps to create a new business or take over an existing business.” (http://www.bdc.ca/Resources%20Manager/misc/CES_2010_EN%20Final.pdf) Retire65 Just six per cent of workers continue to work full-time after age 65 and the average retirement age in Canada is 62. (www.cbc.ca/news/background/retirement/mandatory_retirement.html)


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