Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Developing Effective Social Responses to Violence

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Developing Effective Social Responses to Violence"— Presentation transcript:

1 Developing Effective Social Responses to Violence
Tell it Like it Is: Developing Effective Social Responses to Violence Lulea, Sweden. January 17, 2012  Allan Wade, Ph.D. Centre for Response-Based Practice Duncan B.C. Canada

2

3 Family and individual therapy, supervision, specializing in violence
Centre for Response-Based Practice Family and individual therapy, supervision, specializing in violence Consultation with refuges, child protection, police, victim assistance “Islands of Safety”: Child protection for First Nations, Metis, Inuit peoples “Together for Justice”: Yukon Aboriginal women and R.C.M.P. Family law and domestic violence Analysis of professional reports Workplace training and intervention: Social responses to adversity Research on language and violence: Courts, professionals, media, therapeutic interviews Analysis of emergency protection order interviews

4 Linda Coates, Ph.D. Dept. of Psychology Okanagan College Researcher, Activist Horse and dog lover

5 Family Therapist Mountaineer Chess Master Left Winger Nick Todd Near Calgary, Alberta

6 Cathy Richardson, Ph.D. Metis Activist, Therapist Dept. of Social Work University of Victoria Member, United Nations Panel on Violence Against Indigenous Women

7 Astrid Lindgren

8

9 Zora Neale Hurston “I do not weep at the world. I am too busy sharpening my oyster knife.” “Sweat”

10 Neil Young

11 Daniel & Henrik Sedin

12 Swedish Colleagues Harry and Jocelyn Korman: SIKT, Malmo Karen Thorslund: Private Practice, Gothenburg Ann Hanbert: Therapist and Author, Gothenburg Margareta Hyden: RIV Group, Linkoping, Social Work

13 Developing Effective Social Responses to Violence and Adversity
Tapas Menu 17th Afternoon Tell it Like it Is: Developing Effective Social Responses to Violence and Adversity 18th Morning Small Acts of Living: From Treating Effects to Honouring Resistance 18th Afternoon Drops of Longing: Children’s Responses to Violence and Adversity Order of items may vary depending on freshness and seasonal availability

14 Jen Fran

15 Developing Response-Based Ideas in Practice
Resistance to violence and small affronts is ever-present Perpetrators work to suppress victim resistance Violence is deliberate and controlled (with rare exceptions) Offenders are capable and already know how to be respectful Violence is unilateral: Actions by one person/group against the will of another This did not fit accepted views, discourses, methods: Raised questions If victims resist, why are they represented as passive, submissive? If violence is deliberate, why are offenders seen as out of control? If violence is unilateral, why is it seen as mutual? Analysis/research on language and violence Refined interviewing methods and writing to reflect more accurate view Tied language to social responses: Integrated in interviewing and analysis

16 Dignity

17 What is dignity? Social life is organized largely around the according and preserving of dignity. Respect/worth: Self-respect & respect from others. - “self-esteem” and “social esteem” Inclusion, belonging Autonomy, freedom to think and act and “be” (identity) Physical and psychological integrity (wholeness) The ability to care for others, especially loved ones A sense of efficacy, agency, the ability to “make a difference” An inherent quality of the person, in spiritual and human rights language Created or violated in social interaction Varies with culture and immediate social situations

18 Nelson Mandela I learned my lesson one day from an unruly donkey. We had been taking turns climbing up and down on its back and when my chance came I jumped on and the donkey bolted into a nearby thorn bush. It bent its head, trying to unseat me, which it did, but not before the thorns had pricked and scratched my face, embarrassing me in front of my friends. Like the people of the East, Africans have a highly developed sense of dignity, or what the Chinese call "face". I had lost face among my friends. Even though it was a donkey that unseated me, I learned that to humiliate another person is to make him suffer an unnecessarily cruel fate. Even as a boy, I defeated my opponents without dishonouring them. (1994, p )

19 Dignity in social interaction
Courtesy, politeness, embedded commands Deference to social station (e.g., elders, leaders/roles) Responses to failed jokes Micro-politics of the accidental fart Advice-design and receipt Example: Kieran in hand-out package

20 Dignity Dignity is central to individual and collective well-being. Affronts to dignity create immediate social “problems” that participants work to repair. Humiliation is intense and requires “redress” or “repair”. Failure to supply “just redress” leaves an open social wound. For many victims, humiliation is the primary affront, the most lasting and painful injury: “The bruises go away but you never forget what he said to you.” “He got my body but he didn’t get me.” Responses and resistance are often oriented to preserving, asserting dignity Recovery from violence is largely a struggle for dignity. Our central task, whatever else we do, is to acknowledge the dignity to the victim

21 Social Responses How do friends, family, authorities, media, pets, organizations respond to interpersonal violence – to victims, offenders, children and others directly involved? How do victims and offenders respond to social responses, positive and negative? What information do we have on this subject? How can this information be used to create positive and socially just social responses? How can this information be used to prevent and limit violence, promote full recovery for victims, and provide effective sanctions for offenders?

22 Some Swedish Research on Social Responses
Ninni Carlsson: University of Gothenburg, Dept. of Social Work - Changes in social responses in the 1980’s made it more possible for girls and women to talk about experiences of sexual abuse and express open resistance. Ulla-Carin Hedin: University of Gothenburg, Dept. of Social Work - Social responses to whistleblowers Margareta Hyden: Linkoping - Victims and offenders social networks responses to wife-assault Lucas Forsberg: Linkoping - Men’s subjective experience of violence and responses to them by authorities, friends and families. Steig Larsson: Deceased - The Man who Hated Women (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo)

23 Lisbeth Salander

24 Steig Larsson

25 Rainer Maria Rilke

26 First Duino Elegy Who, if I cried out, would hear me among the angels’ heirarchies? and even if one of them pressed me suddenly against his heart I would be consumed in that overwhelming existence. For beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror, which we are still just able to endure, and we are so awed because it serenely disdains to annihilate us. Every angel is terrifying. And so I hold myself back and swallow the call-note of my dark sobbing. Ah, whom can we ever turn to in our need? Not angels, not humans, and already the knowing animals are aware that we are not really at home in our interpreted world. Rainer Maria Rilke

27 Some Research Results on Social Responses
A majority of victims of violence report receiving negative social responses. What does “positive” and “negative” mean? Examples: Wife-assault, child sexualized abuse, bullying Friends, family, professionals, media Marginalized, disadvantaged people are more likely to receive negative social responses. Examples: LGBTQ, Aboriginal, Refugee, Disabled, Poor The quality of social responses may be the best single predictor of the level of victim distress.

28 Victims’ Responses to Social Responses
Victims respond physically, emotionally, mentally, socially and spiritually to positive and negative social responses E.g., Epigenetic responses to social responses: Brenda Adams Victims who receive POSITIVE social responses: - tend to recover more quickly and fully - are more likely to work with authorities - are more likely to report violence in future Victims who receive NEGATIVE social responses: - less likely to cooperate with authorities - less likely to disclose violence again - more likely to experience distress - more likely to receive diagnosis of mental disorder

29 Victim and Offender Responses to Social Responses
Victims and offenders are mindful of social responses Victims: Children/youth decide to tell, or not Secrecy to avoid judgment, isolation To keep children - knowing she will be blamed Protect children from abuser - knowing he will be protected Immediately during and after attacks (e.g., nightclub) Offenders: Isolation, secrecy, public appearances, surveillance Threats for telling, in home, on body not face, sudden control Excuses, justifications, denials, minimizing Mutualizing, blaming victim

30 Social Conditions and Social Responses:
Understanding Offender Actions and Victim Responses/Resistance in Context Social responses actual and anticipated Social Conditions Offender actions, strategies Victim responses, resistance

31 Criminal Harassment 3 yrs. interrogation surveillance stalking threats “ tgthr” Interaction of Victim & Offender break tgthr distance break

32 Criminal Harassment 3 yrs. interrogation surveillance stalking threats tgthr Interaction of Victim & Offender break tgthr distance break Social Responses police prof. assoc. police police police, crown

33 Victim and Offender Responses and Social Responses in Context
Individual Collective Responses Violence Adverse Actions Social situation Social Responses Victim Offender Social Context, Local Conditions Responses To Social

34 Violence is Unilateral
Violence consists of actions by one person against the will and well being of another Mutual Acts vs. Unilateral Acts Hand-shaking vs. hand-shaking Boxing Kissing Mutual acts entail consent, co-action, co-agency Quote from anonymous Canadian genius

35 Unilateral Mutual forced his mouth on hers wife-assault, beating
forced vaginal penetration beating, attack, assault workplace bullying invasion, genocide international child rape kiss abusive relationships sex, intercourse fight, conflict, argument personality conflict war, conflict, historical relationship problem sex tourist, sex with minors

36 Colonial Discourse Colonization has always been based upon the existence of need and dependency. Not all people are suitable for being colonized; only those who feel this need are suitable. In almost all cases where Europeans have founded colonies we can say that they were expected, and even desired in the unconscious of their subjects. (Mannoni, 1947, cited in Macey)

37 Wife-Assault The partners’ characteristics hold them together As abused partners adapt and become more compliant the partners’ characteristics make them increasingly dependent on one another. After prolonged abuse they develop complementary characteristics: aggressive/passive, demanding/compliant, blaming/accepting guilt. (Anonymous Family Violence Project, 2008)

38 Wife-assault, Sexualized Assault: Judge’s Remarks
“The appellant & his wife engaged in an argument Mr. X became upset over something said during this argument. He thereupon grabbed his wife’s neck, squeezing it until she nearly lost consciousness. He then let go. This brought the argument to an end. That the earlier of the two assaults arose spontaneously in the course of an argument is not in dispute. To that extent it can be said to have been unpremeditated. He was willing to take counselling in reference to his anger & his marital problems. He expressed his deep remorse for what had happened & his desire to improve the marriage. They went to bed and he said, ‘Jane, I’ll have to screw you one more time’, and he had intercourse with her It is obvious difficulties were present in the marriage.”

39 Assumed Equivalence in a Mutualizing Frame
(with apologies for the heteronormative pronouns) he had sex with her she had sex with him they had sex together he kissed her she kissed him they kissed she was in a loving relationship he was in a loving relationship they jointly created a loving relationship she was in an abusive relationship he was in an abusive relationship they jointly created an abusive relationship

40 Lulea Woman Charged with Illegal Money Sharing
Response-Based Wire Service Lulea. Police arrested Tanya Jendersen yesterday for allegedly illegally sharing money in the amount of $500,000.00, from the Bank of Lulea. The bank clerk, who agreed to the transaction when a gun was pointed at her face, was unhurt. “I’m just happy the incident is over”, said Kerri Lightly, who has participated in three similar transactions in recent years. “I don’t know why these customers choose me”, she said. The bank manager, Mr. R.E. Tentive, stressed that Ms. Lightly would receive “psychiatric help to address her anxiety and ensure she no longer attracts greedy customers.” Tanya Jendersen was released on condition that she have no contact with bank clerks and attends specialized treatment for “wealthophelia”, a congenital disorder, more common in first degree biological relatives, characterized by the compulsive pursuit of illegally obtained financial independence.

41 Mutualizing Obscures and reduces offender responsibility Is associated with reduced sentences Co-opts victim consent Portrays victim as co-agent, co-responsible Conceals victim resistance Blames, pathologizes victim Influences descriptions in diverse settings (e.g., courts)

42 Mutualizing Interventions
workplace abuse ~ conflict resolution child/spouse abuse ~ mediation bullying ~ non-violent communication genocide ~ reconciliation

43 Jeremy Mutualizing in responses to racism.

44 Sexualized Assault of Minor
Judge’s Remarks (2004) In January of 1997, shortly after Hazel moved into this new “safe” home, Gordon Hunter (foster parent) began to have sexual intercourse with her. The first incident took place in a caravan parked in front of the home, where Gordon was repairing a water system and Hazel was watching him work. He began to kiss Hazel, pushed her onto a bed in the trailer. He withdrew a condom from his pocket and removed her clothing. He proceeded to sexually assault Hazel, who was 11 years old, a peri-pubescent girl. Notwithstanding the order to stay away from Hazel, the accused continued to meet and sexually assault her until early in On at least one occasion the accused had sexual intercourse with Hazel in a public park. The sexual relationship of Mr. Hunter and Hazel was disclosed early in the proceedings.

45 sexual intercourse with her began to have sexual intercourse with her
Hazel intercourse sexual intercourse sexual intercourse with her began to have sexual intercourse with her relationship sexual relationship the sexual relationship the sexual relationship of Mr. Hunter and Hazel the sexual relationship of Mr. Hunter and Hazel was disclosed

46 Macleans Magazine (2009): Priest sexually assaults three boys
In 1969, John Swales and his brothers attended a summer camp for low income kids where they met a charming, larger than life volunteer named Father Barry Glendinning. [T]he priest soon became a surrogate big brother. He gained the trust of the boys’ parents, showered them with pizzas, movies and booze, and, when opportunity knocked, introduced them to sex. John was 10 years old when the first assault took place. “You name it, he did it,” Swales says. “The impact is so intense and so deep-rooted it is beyond my ability to express it. When you have sex at the age of 10 with your priest, it’s pretty weird.” John’s family won a landmark $1.3-million judgment against Glendinning and the London diocese, but not before a bitter court battle that dragged on for years

47 when opportunity knocked, introduced them to sex
Priest sex to sex them to sex introduced them to sex when opportunity knocked, introduced them to sex have sex have sex at the age of 10 with you have sex at the age of 10 with your priest when you have sex at the age of 10 with your priest its pretty weird

48 Kamloops man accused of procuring sex with child
Vancouver Province Newspaper 2009 A 33 year-old man who allegedly wanted to purchase sex from a three-to-five-year-old girl remained in police custody Monday. The man was arrested Saturday night at a home in Kamloops where he went believing he was to meet a young child for sex. Police received a report from a person who said they had received a text message from the suspect. “The text allegedly asked the person to provide the suspect with a three-to-five-year-old girl for sex, and that he would pay for the service by way of a finder’s fee”, said Sgt. Scott Wilson. The man was arrested for procuring for sexual purposes under Sec. 212 of the Criminal Code. Wilson said the suspect is known to police and was charged with a sexual-related offence with a person under 12 years of age in He was convicted of sex assault in 1999, police added.

49 sex from a three-to-five-year-old girl
Kamloops man sex sex from sex from a three-to-five-year-old girl purchase sex from a three-to-five-year-old girl wanted to purchase sex from a three-to-five-year-old girl for sex a young child for sex meet a young child for sex believing he was to meet a young child for sex

50 procuring for sexual purposes
Kamloops man cont’d sexual sexual purposes for sexual purposes procuring for sexual purposes the man was arrested for procuring for sexual purposes

51 Misrepresenting Intent:
Drawing Mental Inferences from Distorted Accounts “wanted to purchase sex from a three-to-five-year-old girl” “believing he was to meet a young child for sex” “the man was arrested for procuring for sexual purposes”

52 Alternative: Re: Kamloops man
violate violate a young child abduct and violate a young child planning to abduct and violate a young child Intent: “planning to abduct and violate”

53 Colm O’Gorman “Beyond Belief”

54 Colm O’Gorman “The boy lies there, frozen. The covers move as the priest moves over and brings his hand down. He starts to masturbate the boy, who lies there motionless. And then in moments it is over. The confusion and urgency of the sexual charge that took me over and blurred all else has passed and there is only the shock and guilt of what has just happened. I am dizzy and frightened.” (49-50) “I felt so betrayed by my own body, which reacted to what was happening. I was sickened that I could become aroused and experience sexual pleasure at the same time as feeling terrified and disgusted. (49)

55 Colm confronts the Priest
“’Father’, I say. ‘That can never happen again. It’s wrong’. He [Fortune] nods his agreement but doesn’t say anything. Instead he waits to hear what I will say next. ‘It shouldn’t have happened and I don’t know what to do. It’s so very wrong. I feel sick.’ He finally speaks just as I feel I’m about to burst apart with guilt and shame. ‘You’re right, of course you are right. It was wrong and must never happen again. You must never do such a thing again.’” (p. 51)

56 Priest Springs the Trap
“Before long we were close to home, just minutes away Then he [Fortune] cleared his throat and said, ‘I’m worried about you. You have a problem.’ I froze and said nothing, too scared to speak. ‘I am a priest and I have a duty to do something about it’. My mind raced, I didn’t know what he meant by ‘do something’. I didn’t have time to think it through. We were moments away from home, from my parents. ‘I could talk to your father that might be best.’ I started to scream inside. Panic raced through me and the world started to spin. I wanted to escape, jump from the car, anything to get away from that awful moment. Anything to prevent what he said he might do. My father it would kill him to know what I’d done, what I was. He would die from shame.”

57 The case of Colm O’Gorman
Victim and Offender Responses and Social Responses in Context Individual Collective Responses Violence Adverse Actions Social situation Social Responses Victim Offender Social Context, Local Conditions Responses To Social

58 Man Arrested in Frying Pan Dispute
 Sydney Things got too hot in the kitchen for Bill and Sue Smith yesterday, when a disagreement over dinner turned violent. Sue was hit on the head with a frying pan and went to hospital with minor injuries, after police and paramedics attended the scene. While being lifted into the ambulance, she exclaimed, “Being hit on the head with a frying pan is not what I call cooking!” Bill was arrested and released. He stated, “I feel very bad about what’s happened. Cooking has always been a strain on our relationship. We come home tired and hungry and just can’t communicate.” Bill was apparently triggered by Sue’s basil cream sauce. “That’s no excuse”, said Bill, “I can’t allow Sue’s cooking to affect me this way. I need to deal with my basil cream sauce issues”. The couple will attend a new evidence-based, trauma-informed program offered by the Not-So-Brief-or-Solution-Focused Therapy Institute, for couples caught in the cycle of culinary conflict.

59 Developing Effective Social Responses to Violence
“A sense of the unique, specific and concrete circumstances of any situation is the first indispensable step to solving the problems posed by that situation.” (Former Co-President of Ireland, David Trimble, 1998) The nature of violence and resistance in context. The functional links between the different forms of violence. War – rape – child abuse. Colonialism – land theft – rape/wife-assault – child apprehension. Concrete and accurate descriptions are essential in cases of violence. Can be hard to obtain, due partly to the power of language. Analysis of how violence, victims and offenders are portrayed in language. Tomorrow: If we do not have a description of the victim’s responses and resistance, we do not have a full description of the violence.

60 Tack! Thank you!

61 The emotionally abused woman is a particular kind of woman, a woman who has established a pattern of continually being emotionally abused by those she is involved with, whether it be her lover or husband, her boss, her friends, her parents, her children, or her siblings. No matter how successful, how intelligent or how attractive she is, she still feels “less than” other people. Despite perhaps having taken assertive-training classes, she still feels afraid to stand up for herself in her relationships and is still victimized by her low self-esteem, her fear of authority figures, or her need to be taken care of by others. She was emotionally abused as a child, but she may or may not recognize how extensively this kind of childhood continues to affect her life. (Beverly Engel, 1990, p. 7)

62 The Jew is a particular kind of person, a person who has established a pattern of continually being emotionally abused by those she is involved with, whether it be her lover or husband, hr boss, her friends, her parents, her children, or her siblings. No matter how successful, how intelligent or how attractive she is, she still feels “less than” other people. Despite perhaps having taken assertive-training classes, she still feels afraid to stand up for herself in her relationships and is still victimized by her low self-esteem, her fear of authority figures, or her need to be taken care of by others. She was emotionally abused as a child, but she may or may not recognize how extensively this kind of childhood continues to affect her life. (Beverly Engel, 1990, p. 7)

63 Social Responses to Offenders
Swift and decisive social responses (E. Gondolf) “The effectiveness of offender treatment depends in large part on the system of which the treatment is a part.” Criminal Justice & Mental Health Slow, non-enforcement Dual charging Mitigate offender responsibility Men lacking skills and awareness, out of control Specialized courts, services not available Blame victim, stigmatize children Section 15 reports

64 Examples of Resistance to Injustice (Groups of three)
One person shares an instance when they resisted control or oppression of some kind, overtly or covertly, on behalf of themselves or someone else. The second person obtains as much detail as possible about (a) the circumstances the person is responding to, (b) responses of the person that can be seen as resistance and (c) the real and possible social responses the person was aware of or could have faced at the time.


Download ppt "Developing Effective Social Responses to Violence"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google