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1 Title Only Layout Learning about Informal Care Bernadette Sangalang, David and Lucile Packard Foundation Jaime Thomas, Mathematica Policy Research Ana.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Title Only Layout Learning about Informal Care Bernadette Sangalang, David and Lucile Packard Foundation Jaime Thomas, Mathematica Policy Research Ana."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Title Only Layout Learning about Informal Care Bernadette Sangalang, David and Lucile Packard Foundation Jaime Thomas, Mathematica Policy Research Ana Chang, Concept Hatchery Early Childhood Funders Meeting February 19, 2015

2 2 Title, Content and Vertical Image Layout The Packard Foundation’s Early Learning Strategy Learning about informal caregivers (family, friends, neighbors) Research findings from Mathematica and Concept Hatchery Overview

3 3 Title, Content and Vertical Image Layout Improve the quality of early learning and developmental experiences in both formal and informal settings for children, birth through age five, in California. Improving professional development for educators and caregivers to improve the quality of care provided through the formal system. Providing parents, family, and friends that care for children with the skills and support they need to provide quality, nurturing environments for children to grow to ensure they are on track and ready for the classroom by age five. Early Learning Strategy

4 4 Title and Double Column Content Layout Children spend time in a variety of settings Based on analysis of California sample from the 2005 NHES ECPPS and 2007 RAND California Preschool Study; settings listed are those where children spend any time, even if not the majority; “FFN” here is noted as “relative care” in the study; “home-based child care” noted as “non-relative care” in the study. Source: Karoly, Lynn, “The Use of Early Care and Education by California Families,” RAND, INFORMAL FORMAL Age in years

5 5 Title, Content and Vertical Image Layout Who are informal caregivers, what motivates them, what their typical days entail, the kinds of caregiving resources they want and need… Learning about informal caregivers

6 6 Title, Content and Vertical Image Layout Our research partners

7 7 Title, Content and Vertical Image Layout Disseminate informal care research findings Continue to learn from local communities and the field Develop framework and plan for testing scalable pilots Packard Foundation’s next steps

8 8 Mathematica’s study for CFC Research questions Study components Dissemination plan Overview of findings

9 9 Research questions Who are informal caregivers in California? What are their existing networks and needs for support? What are promising outreach methods and approaches to meet their needs?

10 10 Study components A literature scan of recent national and California-specific research on informal caregiving Interviews with two state- and four county-level key informants to learn about existing informal caregiver networks and initiatives Discussions with five individuals from child care resource and referral agencies and other organizations with knowledge of California’s voucher-based child care subsidy system Site visits to five community organizations in Alameda and Santa Clara counties that provide resources and services for parents and caregivers Graphic representations of social systems and supports for informal caregivers and parents through a technique called ecomapping

11 11 Mathematica’s findings presented in 3 briefs Setting the Stage: The Importance of Informal Child Care in California A Close Look: Informal Child Care Arrangements and Support in California (tentative title) The third brief will discuss the needs expressed by informal caregivers and parents, gaps in resources they are able to access, and recommendations for programs and policies to address needs and gaps

12 12 Setting the Stage: The Importance of Informal Child Care in California Many children spend crucial developmental years in informal care Informal child care meets the needs of low-income, working parents Parents and others share concerns about quality in informal care Parents, caregivers, and state and local agency staff agree that informal caregivers need resources and support

13 13 A Close Look: Informal Child Care Arrangements and Support in California Findings from “ecomaps” of care arrangements and sources of support related to child care for parents and informal caregivers Young children are the most common recipients of informal child care; grandparents typically provide such care Parents commonly rely on more than one informal caregiver Many informal caregivers do not receive remuneration for the care they provide, and child care subsidy use is nonexistent in our sample Friends and family are the most common sources of support related to child care –Some parents and caregivers rely on institutional support (for example, child care resource and referral agencies or neighborhood libraries)

14 14 Informal caregiver, 42 Household members: Son, 5 Daughter, 7 Husband, 42 Family 1 Girl, 1 Family 3 Boy, 5 Nephew Mother from Family 1 Parents from Family 3 Families receiving care Support systemRespondent ISC1 Strong support Weak support Quality of Support Note: Arrows indicate flow of support Family 2 Girl, 7 HusbandSisters Friend Other Family Member Grandparent Neighbor Relationship to families receiving care Parents from Family 2 Friends and family are the most common source of support related to child care

15 15 Themes for the third brief Needs expressed by informal caregivers and parents Barriers that informal caregivers have experienced in accessing resources Outreach methods recommended by informal caregivers and parents Elements of promising outreach methods and approaches targeting informal caregivers

16 EARLY CHILDHOOD FUNDER’S MEETING FEBRUARY Concept Hatchery Research funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation Bay Area Early Childhood Funders Meeting Feb Understanding Informal Systems of Care Note: Photos and names have been changed to protect the privacy of research participants. Photos in this presentation are shown courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons. Full list of photographers and references may be found in the public report available on the Packard Foundation CFC web site.

17 EARLY CHILDHOOD FUNDER’S MEETING FEBRUARY Concept Hatchery Jackie, 22 Family friend Confident & parent-centric Amara, 24 Unprepared but coping Elsa, 38 Progressive & lacking time Understanding lives Sasha, 33 Affluent & well connected Ranisha, 45 Grandmother Devoted & disconnected Sofía, 63 Grandmother Diligent & engaged Tara, 45 Aunt Respectful & stabilizing Carmen, 41 Hired help Generous & isolated Emilia, 50 Hired help Sensible & undervalued LEARNING ABOUT INFORMAL CARE Noreen, 42 Overwhelmed & informed Antonia, 21 Disconnected & weary Beth, 21 Supported & anxious Michaela 4 months Jose 14 months Sam & Tom 2 & 4 years Roberto 1 year Johanna 3 years Peter 4 months

18 EARLY CHILDHOOD FUNDER’S MEETING FEBRUARY Concept Hatchery Antonia and Carmen LEARNING ABOUT INFORMAL CARE Caring for kids is hard work! You get no breaks and no benefits. And it’s not appreciated. I wish I knew other babysitters like me. - Carmen I wish my mom was nearby. When I found out I was pregnant I was so scared and wished the earth would swallow me. - Antonia

19 EARLY CHILDHOOD FUNDER’S MEETING FEBRUARY Concept Hatchery Elsa and Sofía LEARNING ABOUT INFORMAL CARE You’ll always find some resources on the street. - Elsa It’s never too late for learning. - Sofía

20 EARLY CHILDHOOD FUNDER’S MEETING FEBRUARY Concept Hatchery Care providers Parents & Family LEARNING ABOUT INFORMAL CARE An extra pair of hands Monotony and logistical hurdles Limited information seeking Weary and feeling guilt Overloaded with information Need trusted sources Building a new identity Parents seek information and take charge of their child’s needs; caregivers are experienced but follow parent lead Motivations and Interactions

21 EARLY CHILDHOOD FUNDER’S MEETING FEBRUARY Concept Hatchery Journey Track Family and close friends are on a “road trip”, knowing they will be connected with the family and child in the long haul. Discovery Bonding and experiences Understand THIS child, not all children Emotional job Hired professional informal care providers are on a “track.” They have defined patterns of work with the same age range of children for a variety of families, sometimes over decades. Safety Support, not advice Invested in long-term jobs Careful not to step out of bounds Functional job LEARNING ABOUT INFORMAL CARE Experiences and motivations Different types of informal care providers engage with the child and family in different ways.

22 EARLY CHILDHOOD FUNDER’S MEETING FEBRUARY Concept Hatchery LEARNING ABOUT INFORMAL CARE Needs Hierarchy Stabilize Make Changes. Give Back Shelter. Food. Safety Language. Peer Network Mobility. Information Access Support. Identity Choices. Permissions Connect Empower Grow

23 EARLY CHILDHOOD FUNDER’S MEETING FEBRUARY Concept Hatchery Thank you Concept Hatchery


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