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1 Chapter 13 – Taxation and Efficiency Public Finance McGraw-Hill/Irwin © 2005 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., All Rights Reserved.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Chapter 13 – Taxation and Efficiency Public Finance McGraw-Hill/Irwin © 2005 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., All Rights Reserved."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Chapter 13 – Taxation and Efficiency Public Finance McGraw-Hill/Irwin © 2005 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., All Rights Reserved.

2 2 Introduction Are people unaffected by a tax increase if they pay zero in taxes afterwards? –No, consumption may have changed in response to the tax increase –Bundle consumed is less desirable Excess burden is a loss of welfare above and beyond the tax revenues collected.

3 3 Excess Burden Defined Two commodities –Barley and corn Fixed income P b and P c are prices of goods No distortions such as externalities, imperfect competition, public goods, etc.

4 4 Excess Burden Defined Figure 13.1 shows the budget constraint (AD), with utility maximized at bundle E 1. Ad-valorem tax levied on barley at rate t b raises the price to (1+t b )P b and rotates the budget constraint along the x-axis. The new budget constraint is AF.

5 Figure 13.1

6 6 Excess Burden Defined At each consumption level of barley, the vertical distance between AD and AF shows tax payments in terms of forgone corn. Normalize P c =$1, so that vertical distance can be measured in either quantity of corn or dollars.

7 7 Excess Burden Defined Figure 13.2 shows new optimizing choice with the higher prices along budget constraint AF. Utility maximized at bundle E 2. Vertical distance between old and new budget constraints is GE 2, the “tax bill.”

8 8 Excess Burden Defined Any tax will lower utility, but is there an alternative tax that raises the same revenue, GE 2, but entails a smaller utility loss? Or greater revenue with the same utility loss? If so, the tax on barley leads to excess burden.

9 Figure 13.2

10 10 Excess Burden Defined Equivalent variation is the amount of income we would have to take away (before any tax was imposed) to induce a move to the lower indifference curve (Increasing price is equivalent to a income reduction). Taking away income is equivalent to a parallel movement inward on the budget constraint. Budget constraint HI in Figure 13.3 shows this.

11 Figure 13.3

12 12 Excess Burden Defined Note that ME 3 =GN>GE 2, but both give the consumer the same utility. Thus, the difference E 2 N is the excess burden of the barley tax. The barley tax makes the person worse off by an amount that exceeds the revenue it generates.

13 13 Excess Burden Defined Lump sum tax is a tax that must be paid regardless of the taxpayer’s behavior. Budget constraint HI satisfies this. Revenue yield exactly equals the equivalent variation. –Conclusion: Lump sum tax has no excess burden.

14 14 Questions and Answers Why aren’t lump sum taxes widely used? –Construed as unfair because people’s abilities to pay vary How do lump sum taxes relate to welfare economics? –The equilibrium conditions become:

15 15 Questions and Answers Intuitively, when MRS>MRT the marginal utility of substituting barley consumption for corn consumption exceeds the change in production costs from doing so. In the presence of the tax, there is no financial incentive to do so.

16 16 Questions and Answers Does an income tax entail excess burden? –It usually does entail excess burden, if a third commodity, leisure, exists. If demand for a commodity is perfectly inelastic, is there excess burden? –Yes, see Figure 13.4.

17 Figure 13.4

18 18 Questions and Answers In Figure 13.4, the ordinary (uncompensated) demand curve is inelastic – B 1 =B 2 when the price increases. But this is because the income effect offsets the substitution effect. The substitution effect is the part necessary to compute excess burden. The compensated demand curve (which holds utility constant as prices change) is the relevant one, and the elasticity for it is non-zero.

19 19 Excess Burden Measurement with Demand Curves Consider a compensated demand curve, such as the one in Figure Impose an ad-valorem tax on barley, so that its price increases to (1+t b )P b. Equivalent to the supply curve shifting upward.

20 Figure 13.5

21 21 The measurement of excess burden The concept of excess burden can be reinterpreted using (compensated) demand curves. Assume that the compensated demand curve for barley can be represented by the straight line D b For convenience, we continue to assume that the social marginal cost of barley is constant at P b. Suppose that a tax at percentage rate t b is levied on barley, so the new price, (1 + t b )P b, is associated with supply curve S b. The excess burden of the tax, fid, is one-half the product of its base (the tax-induced change in the quantity of barley) and height (the tax per pound), that is -(1/2)(  P) (  q)…………………..(*) Since  q=(q 1 /p b ) (  P)  with  P=t b P b, some simple algebra leads to the conclusion that the excess burden (*) can be written -(1/2)  P b q l (t b ) 2 (10.3) where  is the value of the compensated price elasticity of demand (in general  <0) for barley.

22 22 A high absolute value of  indicates that the compensated quantity demanded is quite sensitive to changes in price. Thus, the presence of  in Equation (10.3) makes intuitive sense--the more the tax distorts the (compensated) consumption decision, the higher the excess burden. Finally, the presence of (t b ) 2 suggests that as the tax rate increases, excess burden goes up with its square. Doubling a tax quadruples its excess burden, other things being the same. Because excess burden in- creases with the square of the tax rate, the marginal excess burden from raising one more dollar of revenue exceeds the average excess burden. That is, the incremental excess burden of raising one more dollar of revenue exceeds the ratio of total excess burden to total revenues. This fact has important implications for cost- benefit analysis.

23 23  Similarly, the concept of excess burden can be reinterpreted using (compensated) supply curves. Assume that the social marginal cost of barley is upward sloping. The excess burden of the tax can be approximated by -(1/2)(  p s ) (  q)…………………..(**)  Since  q=(q 1 /p s ) (  p s )  with  p s =-t s p, some simple algebra leads to the conclusion that the excess burden (**) can be written  (1/2)  pq(t s ) 2 (10.**)  where  is the value of the compensated price elasticity of supply (in general  >0) for barley.

24 24 Excess Burden Measurement with Demand Curves Excess burden equal to triangle fid. Through some mathematical manipulation, this can be expressed as:

25 25 Excess Burden Measurement with Demand Curves Implications of formula: –Higher (compensated) elasticities lead to larger excess burden. –Excess burden increases with the square of the tax rate. –The greater the initial expenditure on the taxed commodity, the larger the excess burden.

26 26 Differential Taxation of Inputs Some inputs are taxed differently depending on where they are used: –Capital used in the corporate sector is subject to a higher tax rate than capital used in the noncorporate sector. –Labor used in the household is untaxed Figure 13.8 measures the efficiency cost

27 Figure 13.8

28 28 Differential Taxation of Inputs In this figure, total amount of labor is fixed at OO’. Moving along the x-axis simply shifts labor from the labor market to the household sector. VMP is the value of marginal product, or the dollar value of the additional input produced from an hour of work. VMP declines with hours worked in a sector. Optimal allocation of hours equates margins, such that OH * is spent in household production, and O’H * is spent in the market.

29 29 Differential Taxation of Inputs If a tax is levied on market work, but not household production, then the “effective” VMP curve for market work rotates downward. Figure 13.9 shows the effects.

30 Figure 13.9

31 31 Differential Taxation of Inputs People shift hours into nonmarket work. –Household production increases from OH * to OH t, while market work decreases from O’H * to O’H t. Excess burden equal to abe.

32 32 Overall excess burden To summarize: Given that the tax on rum was already in place, the tax on gin creates an excess burden of efd in the gin market and simultaneously decreases excess burden by cbhg in the rum market. If cbhg is sufficiently large, the tax can actually reduce overall excess burden. This is an example of the theory of the second best: In the presence of existing distortions, policies that in isolation would increase efficiency can decrease it and vice versa. This discussion is a special case of the result that the excess burden of a set of taxes generally depends on the whole set of tax rates, as well as on the degree of substitutability and complementarity among the various commodities. Specifically, suppose that n commodities are subject to taxation. Let P i be the before-tax price of the ith commodity; t i the ad valorem tax on the ith commodity; and S ij, the compensated response in the demand of the ith good with respect to a change in the price of the jth good. Then the overall excess burden is

33 33 Recap of Taxation and Efficiency Excess Burden Defined Questions and Answers Excess Burden Measurement with Demand Curves Differential Taxation of Inputs


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