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Intelligence Give a definition of intelligence that you could defend, explaining why you believe you could defend it. Give examples of ways your definition.

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Presentation on theme: "Intelligence Give a definition of intelligence that you could defend, explaining why you believe you could defend it. Give examples of ways your definition."— Presentation transcript:

1 Intelligence Give a definition of intelligence that you could defend, explaining why you believe you could defend it. Give examples of ways your definition of intelligence might be measured and skills people might have who would do well on those measures. Describe how you would differentiate measures of intelligence from measures of achievement. Developed by W. Huitt, 1999

2 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Gardner defines intelligence as A human intellectual competence [that] must entail a set of skills of problem solving--enabling the individual to resolve genuine problems or difficulties that he or she encounters and, when appropriate, to create an effective product--and must also entail the potential for finding or creating problems--thereby laying the groundwork for the acquisition of new knowledge. (Gardner, 1983) Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. New York: Basic Books.

3 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Gardner established the following criteria for identifying distinct intelligences: Isolation by brain damage The existence of individuals with exceptional talent A distinct developmental history An evolutionary history A set of core operations Experimental evidence Encoding in a symbol system

4 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Gardner originally identified seven intelligences, but has since expanded that number to eight and one-half. Gardner argues that traditional paper-and- pencil tests do not adequately measure some aspects of intelligence that are relevant in everyday life. The stability (reliability) and predictive accuracy (validity) of his tests have yet to be demonstrated.

5 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Linguistic Intelligence Core element: Ability to make a rapid conversion from a physical representation of stimuli (i.e., letters and/or other verbal symbols) to higher-level codes; ability to manipulate information in activated memory

6 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Logical- Mathematical Intelligence Core element: Ability to generalize from specific experiences and form new, more abstract concepts and rules; ability to reason quickly and well; ability to reason quantitatively

7 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Spatial Intelligence Core element: Ability to visualize and mentally rotate a stimulus or stimulus array

8 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Bodily- Kinesthetic Intelligence Core element: Ability to control of one's bodily motions and capacity to handle objects skillfully

9 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Musical Intelligence Core elements: Ability to translate written symbols into pitch, rhythm, timbre

10 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Interpersonal Intelligence Core element: Ability to notice and make distinctions among other individuals and, in particular, among their moods, temperaments, motivations, and intentions

11 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Intrapersonal Intelligence Core element: Ability to distinguish and identify various personal thoughts and feelings and to use them to understand one's own behavior

12 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Ecology/ Environment Core element: Ability to discern similarities and differences and make classifications among the living organisms in one’s environment

13 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Spiritual/ Transpersonal Core element: Ability to search for and connect with (sense/perceive) stimuli that have been labeled non-physical or metaphysical

14 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence While Gardner proposes that the intelligences are anatomically (brain-location) separate, the intelligences operate interdependently.

15 Gardner’s Theory of Intelligence Brualdi (1996) gives the example of a dancer who can excel in his art only if he has: Brualdi, Amy C. (1996). Multiple intelligences: Gardner's theory. Washington, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse on Assessment and Evaluation. [ED410226] 1) strong musical intelligence to understand the rhythm and variations of the music, 2) interpersonal intelligence to understand how he can inspire or emotionally move his audience through his movements, as well as 3) bodily-kinesthetic intelligence to provide him with the agility and coordination to complete the movements successfully.

16 Using Gardner’s Theory educator’s should address all of the intelligences in each lesson each student should have an opportunity to use and develop his or her primary intelligences each day (impact efficacy) The following are some implications of Gardner’s theory for educators:

17 Using Gardner’s Theory all of the intelligences should be the focus of assessment and evaluation all of the intelligences should be represented by expertise among the faculty (identification and modeling) The following are some implications of Gardner’s theory for educators:

18 Using Gardner’s Theory Gardner and Sternberg have recently combined forces to develop ways to implement their theories in classrooms.

19 The End


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