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"The upside potential for good in Christian Giving is immense, almost unimaginable. If American Christians were to give from their income generously not.

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Presentation on theme: ""The upside potential for good in Christian Giving is immense, almost unimaginable. If American Christians were to give from their income generously not."— Presentation transcript:

1 "The upside potential for good in Christian Giving is immense, almost unimaginable. If American Christians were to give from their income generously not lavishly mind you, only generously-they could transform the world” "Passing the Plate" - Christian Smith and Michael O. Emerson

2 Church Attendance  In 2005 the United States contained approximately 226,070,000 professing to be Christians...in various levels of commitment. About 140,090,000 are members of Christian churches report going to church as least two times a month, and describe themselves as as strong or very strong Christians. About 149,822,000 report that religion provides a great deal of guidance in their day to day life. In short, well more than one hundred million are practicing and professing Christians.

3 Money for Outreach  Christians in the US in 2005 earned 2 trillion dollars. (Give approx. 16 billion)  If all US Christians gave 10% of their income would add an additional 46 billion dollars for the work of the church.

4 How We Give All Contributors: 18-20%, one in five, give literally nothing to the parish they attend. 60% of givers give less than 2% of their income; 13.6% give more than 10% of their income. Regularly Attending: 4%, give literally nothing to the parish they attend. 40% of givers give less than 2% of their income; 22% give more than 10% of their income.

5 How About The Episcopal Church  Episcopalians make up between 1.7% % of the US population totaling 44,841,600 with an average salary of $52,000.  17.4% of Episcopalians give little or no money to their church. Episcopalians average giving is 2% of their income. 12% give 10% or more.

6 Episcopal Church  Who is giving? (averages, some more some less. Percents will not add up to 100%)  10%-20% give nothing  15%-25% give less than 2%  60%-70% give between 2% and 10%  9%-12% give 10%  1% - 3% give more than 10%

7 Average Pledge  Average Salary - $52000  10% (Tithe) - $5200  2% Average Pledge - $1040  Try having the goal of moving the average pledge higher. Aim for an additional 1% for the next three years

8 Where do Christians Spend Their Money  In 2005, Americans spent 27.9 billion dollars on candy  in 2004 Americans spent 92.9 billion dollars on refreshment beverages  In 2000, Americans spent billion dollars on entertainment products, including 67.9 billion on Televisions.

9 Where do Christians Spend Their Money  In 2003, Americans spent 45 billion dollars on state lotteries  In 2000, Americans spent 29.8 billion dollars on alcohol beverages. At an average of $372 per person, that is $172 more than the average person gives to their church.

10  While the median income has risen 17% since the 1960’s……..  In general, between 1959 and 2000, while Americans financial giving was declining, the personal consumption expenses have been increasing.

11 The Authors’ Conclusion  In general, it appears that the overall US consumer market is increasingly tilting not toward products meeting basic needs, but the spending ordinary Americans on luxury items.  We are spending more on “wants”, than “needs”.  or the “wants” have become “needs”

12 Why Don’t We Give More?  We have not confronted and grappled with the theological and moral teachings of their traditions toward generous giving  We do not give generously because our churches have a very low expectations of giving. A lack of community norms on encouraging and celebrating generous giving.

13 Why Don’t We Give More?  Unperceived Needs: Most American Christians do not give their money generously because they simply do not perceive existing legitimate needs that their money could address and meet.

14 Why Don’t We Give More?  We do not give generously, because not only is there not a community norm for giving more, there is also no consequences for giving less  Despite American affluence generally, many American Christians simply do not possess the discretionary financial resources to give 10 percent of their income, given the many fixed costs of living in American society.

15 Why Don’t We Give More?  Parishioners have cited bills and debt as a hurtle to their own giving ability, saying, "Bills come first" and "I got all the bills, and my children, you know here at home, and trying to do this and that.”  "People do not have a surplus of money. The common man doesn't have it, and a lot of people go from pay check to pay check."

16 Why Don’t We Give More?  We give out of scarcity rather than giving out of abundance. Most Christians feel they do not have enough money to give more, rather than acknowledge all the gifts God has given them and giving accordingly.

17 Conclusion  "The upside potential for good in Christian Giving is immense, almost unimaginable. If American Christians were to give from their income generously not lavishly mind you, only generously-they could transform the world” Christian Smith;Michael O Emerson;Patricia Snell. Passing the Plate: Why American Christians Don't Give Away More Money


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