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Canterbury Tales Ally Simon and Rachel Dean The Franklin Wealthy landowner who travels with the Man of Law.

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Presentation on theme: "Canterbury Tales Ally Simon and Rachel Dean The Franklin Wealthy landowner who travels with the Man of Law."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Canterbury Tales Ally Simon and Rachel Dean

3 The Franklin Wealthy landowner who travels with the Man of Law

4 “ White as a daisy-petal was his beard. A sanguine man, high-colored and benign” (line ). He is an aged man with a pure white beard and a confident, cheerful personality. Physical Characteristics, Clothing, and Accessories His complexion is ruddy (due to his high alcohol intake), and he is stout (due to his consumption of sweets). He wore a white silk purse attached to his belt, and a dagger.

5 Words, experiences, personality traits “He loved a morning sop of cake in wine. He lived for pleasure and had always done” (344). He is a big eater, and his house is overflowing with a large variety of foods. For example, “his house was never short of baked-meat pies, of fish and flesh” ( ). Furthermore, he changes his meats and drinks according to what foods are in season. He is a man who takes pleasure in all life has to offer without sacrificing his desires. However, he is also hospitable and generous with his culinary fare. “In his hall a table stood arrayed and ready all day long, with places laid” ( ).

6 Indirect Characterization Franklin is a shallow, self-indulgent man who cares too much about eating. “It positively snowed with meat and drink and all the dainties that a man could think” ( ).

7 Member for the Shire (Parliamentary representative for the county). Social Class Inferences Franklin is described as wealthy but doesn’t seem to come from a class of aristocracy. “He was a model among landed gentry” (370).

8 Deadly Sin or Moral Virtue Franklin is described as “Epicurus’ very son,” (line 346) which means that he lived primarily for personal pleasure. Epicurus was a Greek philosopher who taught that pleasure was the most important goal in life. This is because once the body died, the soul died too. Therefore all life should be enjoyed. However, Chaucer implies that the pursuit of pleasure is gluttony.

9 Yes, Franklin upholds the proper values of his social position. He is generous, a patron of hospitality, and always has food on the table. Chaucer is criticizing the men that indulge in alcohol (wine in particular), sweets, and other excesses in consumption of food. elated&fb_source=message

10 Squire The Squire is the Knight's son, accompanying him on this pilgrimage.

11 Physical Characteristics Squire is young (around 20 years old), agile and of moderate height. He is “a lover and cadet, a lad of fire.” (82) Chaucer is tongue-in-cheek here describing a young person raised in privilege that is experimenting and sampling pleasures with minimal responsibilities. In his carriage, behavior and tastes, he is still immature, with nothing like his father’s gravity. The imagery that Chaucer uses to describe him includes meadows, fresh flowers, and songs. “He was as fresh as is the Month of May.” (94) Chaucer also keenly notes that the Squire’s exploits in battle were not motivated by any loyalty to the realm, but to impress a lady.

12 Words, Experiences, Personality Traits Chaucer tells us that the Squire is an accomplished gentleman who rides a horse well, jousts well, writes verse, draws, dances and carves the meat for his father, the Knight, at dinner (which shows good manners). He also stays out all night and sleeps “as little as a nightingale” (100).

13 Indirect Characterization Chaucer spends a lot of time describing the Squire’s social accomplishments and passion. We get the impression that the Squire is immature, self-indulgent, a little spoiled, a bit of a pretty boy, and prone to pursuing ladies that keep him up all night.

14 Social Class The Squire represents youthfulness, exuberance, curiosity and passion. In the extreme, this is the venal sin of lust. The Knight’s son Deadly sin or moral virtue

15 Yes, the Squire upholds the proper values of his social position. In the prologue, the Knight is a grown-up version of the Squire, who is still callow and carefree. The Squire knows how to have a good time (he gets very little sleep), how to handle a horse and joust, how to be entertaining (he writes, draws, sings, plays music), and also courteous and respectful (he carves the meat at dinner for his father). Chaucer criticizes the character of the Squire subtly. He paints a portrait of an accomplished and attractive young man who is nevertheless not engaged in any serious pursuits. The Squires were supposed to be "the finests" as many policemen are called today. These were the young men who would one day become powerful Knights. However, they are busy “fluting all the day” (93) and carousing all night. GyY&feature=related&fb_source=message

16 The Miller

17 Physical Characteristics, Clothing, and Accessories He’s huge, with a red beard, wide black nostrils, a gaping mouth, and a wart on his nose with a tuft of hairs growing on it that are as red as the bristles in a sow’s ears. “A great stout fellow big in brawn and bone” (562). “His beard, like any sow or fox, was red and broad as well, as though it were a spade” ( ). “He wore a hood of blue and a white coat” (582).

18 Words, Experiences, and Personality Traits Many of the Miller’s activities are physical as well: he can break doors open with his head and always wins the ram, or top prize, at wrestling matches He regularly steals corn from his customers (probably by mixing filler into their sacks) or charges 3 times the proper fee for it “He liked to play his bagpipes up and down” (583).

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20 Social Class The Miller’s portrait draws heavily upon negative medieval stereotypes about lower- class people. The idea was that such people were “all brawn, no brains.”

21 Deadly Sin or Moral Virtue In "The Miller's Tale”, one has three different possibilities: 1) Get a job and a house, 2) Move into a woman’s building 3) Be really romantic, sending her a lot of flowers and gifts, and singing moonlight love songs outside her window.

22 Yes, the Squire upholds the proper values of his social position. In the prologue, the Knight is a grown-up version of the Squire, who is still callow and carefree. The Squire knows how to have a good time (he gets very little sleep), how to handle a horse and joust, how to be entertaining (he writes, draws, sings, plays music), and also courteous and respectful (he carves the meat at dinner for his father). o&fb_source=message

23 Chaucer is criticizing the relationships of two individuals. He explains how a carpenter's wife cheats on him with a clerk, which confirms the Miller's lustful predisposition. Therefore, the Miller's character questions as many stereotypes as it draws upon.


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