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Canadian Cancer Society Brand Health Presentation September 12, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Canadian Cancer Society Brand Health Presentation September 12, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Canadian Cancer Society Brand Health Presentation September 12, 2013

2 Objectives and Methodology 2 From January 15 th to 21 st 2013, Angus Reid Public Opinion conducted an online survey on behalf of the Canadian Cancer Society. The purpose of this study is to understand perceptions of the Canadian Cancer Society’s brand within the context of a competitive set of other cancer-focused charitable organizations functioning in Canada. –To this end, this report contains analysis using Vision Critical’s Brand Advancement Model (BAM), which measures various metrics of a brand’s health. A total of 1,002 Canadian adults were surveyed online. The margin of error for this sample is +/3.1%, nineteen times out of twenty. Respondents were recruited from the Angus Reid Forum, Canada’s leading on-line national access panel. The sample was balanced by gender, age, region and education within Canada and the final results were weighted by the same criteria to be representative of the country’s population overall. Total British Columbia Alberta Prairies (SK & MB) OntarioQuebec Atlantic Canada Number of Completes1,0021481055834026685 Margin of error+/-3.1+/- 8.1+/- 9.6+/- 12.9+/-5.3+/- 6.0+/- 10.6

3 Profile: Donation Habits Past Support for CCS Personal Connection to Cancer

4 Donations to Charitable Organizations in Past Year Base: All respondents (n=1002) Q3In the past year, approximately how many charitable organizations did you donate to? Base: Those who donated to charitable organizations in past year (n=812) Q4Thinking about the last 12 months, what was the total amount of all your charitable donations together? 4 # of Charitable Organizations Donated to in Past Year Total Amount of Charitable Donations 81% Donated to at least one charity Four-in-five (81%) Canadians report having donated to at least one charitable organization in the past year, with 15 per cent reporting donations to five or more charities. One-in-five (19%) Canadians report that the sum of their donations amounted to more than $500. Residents of Quebec are least likely to have made a donation (70%) and more likely to have donated less money (63% donated less than $100). Propensity to have donated money increases with household income

5 Donations to Cancer Organizations in Past Year NOTE: Responses less than 4% not shown Base: All respondents who have heard of at least 1 charity and have donated money (n=788) Q8Which of the following organizations did you make a monetary donation to within the past year? 5 The Canadian Cancer Society leads all other cancer related organizations in donation behaviour, with two-in-five (38%) Canadian donors reporting they donated to CCS over the last year. This proportion is relatively consistent with those seen in previous research in 2012. 64% Reporting having made a cancer related donation over the last year

6 Support for the Canadian Cancer Society Base: All respondents who heard or know about the CSS (n=993) Q16In what ways, if any, did you support the Canadian Cancer Society in the past year? 6 57% have engaged in 1 or more activity 30% have engaged in 2 or more activities 13% have engaged in 3 or more activities Three-in-five (57%) Canadians report having supported CCS over the last year through various activities. The most prevalent of these activities include one-time donations (31%), buying daffodils (23%) or wearing a daffodil pin (18%). Similar findings were observed in research conducted in May 2012.

7 Brand Foundations: Awareness/Familiarity Favourability Likely to Recommend Likely to Donate

8 Unaided Awareness: Canadian Health Charities NOTE: Responses less than 4% not shown (with the exception of competitive set organizations) Base: All respondents (n=1002) Q1When you think of Canadian health charities, which are the top three (3) that first come to mind? 8 First Mention (Top-Of-Mind)All Mentions * Hospitals (Sub-NET) includes: Sick Kids Hospital (2% First Mention; 6% Total Mention) Princess Margaret Hospital (1% First Mention; 3% Total Mention) One-in-four (24%) Canadians cite CCS on an unaided basis as a top-of-mind Canadian health charity; ahead of all other organizations of this description. This proportion rises to just under one-half (45%) among total unaided mentions.

9 Unaided Awareness: Canadian Cancer Charities NOTE: Responses less than 4% not shown (with the exception of competitive set organizations) Base: All respondents (n=1002) Q2When you think of Canadian cancer charities, which are the top three (3) that first come to mind? 9 First Mentions (Top of Mind)All Mentions Over one-third (36%) of Canadians cite CCS on an unaided basis as a top-of-mind Canadian cancer charity. Similar to Canadian health charities, this proportion rises to just under one-half (44%) among total mentions.

10 Aided Awareness: Familiarity with Canadian Cancer Charities Base: All respondents (n=1002) Q5.How familiar are you with the following? 10 *Total Aware = Have a good level of knowledge + Heard of name, but don’t know much about it While awareness of the three main cancer charities is almost unanimous, the Canadian Cancer Society is the charity with the highest proportion of Canadians who report having a good level of knowledge about the organization (58%).

11 Overall Favourability Base: All respondents who have heard of at least 1 charity (n=971) Q6.For each of the organizations you are familiar with, how would you describe your impressions of the following organizations? 11 *Total Favourable = Very Favourable + Somewhat Favourable At least two-in-three Canadians offer each of the measured cancer organizations an overall favourable evaluation. CCS leads all organizations in this measure with 78 per cent reporting favourability and roughly one- half (47%) saying they have a “very favourable” view of the organization.

12 Likelihood to Recommend Canadian Cancer Charities Base: All respondents who have heard of at least 1 charity (n=971) Q7How likely is it that you would recommend the following cancer charities to a friend, family or colleague? 12 Average 6.6 6.5 6.6 6.2 Using a 11 point scale where: 0 = Extremely unlikely 10 = Extremely likely Roughly similar proportions of Canadians are likely to recommend CCS, Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation and their local regional hospital to friends families or colleagues. On this measure, the Terry Fox Foundation lags behind the other organizations. Only one-in-ten are unlikely to recommend any of the charitable organizations.

13 Likelihood to Donate to Canadian Cancer Organization Next Year Base: All respondents who have heard of at least 1 charity (n=971) Q9 How likely are you to donate to each of these charities over the next year? 13 The Canadian Cancer Society and regional hospitals and foundations are marginally more likely than the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation to receive a donation over the next year. However, as is the case with likelihood to recommend, the Terry Fox Foundation lags significantly behind the other cancer organizations. *Total Likely = Extremely likely + Very likely + somewhat likely

14 by age group 18-3435-5455+ 1%5%7% Personal Connection to Cancer Base: All respondents (n=1002) Q17Have you experienced any personal connection to cancer? 14 6% myself Are currently being treated for cancer or are cancer survivors 70% family member or friend 81% have a connection to cancer Four-in-five Canadians have a connection to cancer, either through family/friends/colleagues or directly. The propensity to report being a cancer survivor or currently in treatment increases with age.

15 15 How Does a Personal Connection to Cancer Affect Perceptions? 81% of Canadians have a connection to cancer. … be familiar with each of the cancer charities … think of CCS as a top-of-mind health charity and cancer charity. … be favourable towards the Terry Fox Foundation …donate to each of the measured cancer charities in the upcoming year. …have participated in one or more Canadian Cancer Society activity over the past year. Those with a personal connection cancer are more likely to... Familiarity Favourability Donation Engagement with CCS

16 Does Familiarity, Favourability & Past Behaviour DRIVE whether or not someone will donate to the Canadian Cancer Society?

17 17 Drivers of Future Donation to CCS * These importance scores are the result of a Shapley Value regression for which the overall R2 value (extent to which support is explained by the attributes) is 49%. The driver analysis further demonstrates that the more connected an individual is to the Canadian Cancer Society the more likely they are to donate to the organization in the future. Put another way, past behaviour is a strong predictor of future behaviour. Relative Importance

18 Roles & Performance of Cancer Organizations

19 Most Important and Second Most Important Roles of Cancer Organizations Base: All respondents (n=1002) Q11Thinking about the activities that cancer organizations can focus on, which of the following activities is the most important to you? Q12And which of these activities is the next most important to you? Two-in-five (38%) Canadians point to funding cancer research as the most important activity undertaken by cancer organizations. This activity is significantly ahead of providing support services (23%) and promoting healthy lifestyles (16%).

20 Success of the Canadian Cancer Society Base: All respondents who have heard of CCS (n=993) Q13Based on what you know about the Canadian Cancer Society, please indicate how well you think the charity does the following activities. 20 Over one-half of Canadians believe that the Canadian Cancer Society is doing “extremely well” or “very well” in providing information, funding research, promoting a healthy lifestyle and providing support services.

21 Success of the Canadian Cancer Society Base: All respondents who have heard of CCS (n=993) Q13Based on what you know about the Canadian Cancer Society, please indicate how well you think the charity does the following activities. 21 lFamiliar with CCS?Favourable towards CCS? Past CCS Donor? Past CCS Supporter? Total Good knowledge AwareYesNeutralNoYesNoYesNo Providing reliable information 65%74%51%73%40%22%76%60%74%52% Funding cancer research 58%67%46%67%28%23%69%54%67%48% Promotion of healthy lifestyles 55%63%43%63%28%17%67%49%65%41% Providing support services 52%60%41%60%26%14%64%45%62%40% Influencing governments 36%43%26%42%15%18%44%34%42%29% Residents of Saskatchewan are significantly more likely than those in the rest of Canada to say that CCS performs “extremely well” or “very well” in influencing government policy (59%) and providing reliable information (71%). Those with the strongest ties to CCS (through stated knowledge, favourability, past donations and past support) are most likely to offer CCS a positive rating for each of the measured activities. % who report CCS performs “extremely well” or “very well”

22 Leaders in Cancer Organization Activities Base: All respondents who heard or know about any charity (n=999) Q14.Among the following cancer charities, which one do you think is the leader in the following area? 22 Funding Cancer Research Provides Support Services That Improve Quality of Life Promotes Healthy Lifestyles That Help Prevent Cancer Influences Governments for Changes in Public Policy and Allocation of Resources to Fight Cancer Provides Reliable Information About Cancer CCS leads all organizations by a significant margin on performance of each of the measured activities. In fact, its lead over second place organizations is greater by a factor of between two and three.

23 Leaders in Cancer Organization Activities Base: All respondents who heard or know about any charity (n=999) Q14.Among the following cancer charities, which one do you think is the leader in the following area? 23 As was the case with measuring CCS’s performance, propensity to cite the organization as the leader in each of the measured activities is highest among those most familiar with CCS (through stated knowledge, past donations and past support) and those most favourable towards CCS. In no instance do CCS advocates (knowledgeable, favourable, supporters...) prioritize other cancer-related organizations in terms of delivery on these activities. lFamiliar with CCS?Favourable towards CCS? Past CCS Donor? Past CCS Supporter? Total Good knowledge AwareYesNeutralNoYesNoYesNo Providing reliable information 50% 57%41%55%38%14%59%47%56%42% Funding cancer research 43% 48%37%49%26%15%52%42%47%39% Promotion of healthy lifestyles 41% 46%35%45%32%15%47%40%45%37% Providing support services 38% 43%32%43%22%16%47%36%44%30% Influencing governments 35% 40%28%39%24%9%43%32%40%28% % who report CCS is the leader in this metric

24 24 Base: All respondents who heard or know about the CSS (n=993) Q15How well do you think the following statement describes the Canadian Cancer Society? Using a 11 point scale where: 0 = Does not describe the charity at all 10 = Describes the charity very well The Canadian Cancer Society’s Impact on Fighting Cancer “The Canadian Cancer Society is the cancer charity that has the greatest impact on fighting cancer.” With the exception of periods immediately following the CCS Daffodil Campaign, perceptions of the organization as the “cancer charity that has the greatest impact on fighting cancer” have remained relatively stable since early 2011. Post – Daffodil Campaign

25 Brand Advancement Measures (BAM) Analysis

26 As part of the Brand Advancement Measures (BAM) exercise, respondents were asked to consider a defined competitive set of organizations associated with cancer in Canada, and whether or not they associated different attributes with each. 26 Understanding Brand Health Measurements (Step #1) CHARITY A CHARITY B CHARITY C Inspirational COMPETITIVE SET Brand Attributes Cares about People Excellent Reputation Active in Community

27 The total number of associations with each attribute for each brand were calculated and correlated with the dependent variable: likelihood to donate to a cancer organization. The result of the correlation is the determination of relative importance of each attribute in driving donation behaviour. 27 Understanding Brand Health Measurements (Step #2) Likelihood to Donate to a Cancer Organization - #1 most important brand attribute - #2 most important brand attribute - #3 most important brand attribute - #4 most important brand attribute - #5 most important brand attribute - #6 most important brand attribute... Relative Importance Inspirational Cares about People Excellent Reputation Active in Community

28 28 Understanding Brand Health Measurements (Step #3) Results reveal the extent to which each organization, or brand, “owns” each of the attributes tested, in descending order of their relevant importance to driving donation behaviour. Additional brand health scores are tabulated to determine “Profile,” “Originality” and “Power” scores Power: How much do you own the attributes that drive brand choice? The data from the brand association exercise is metricized to increase the differentiation between ratings among brands across respondents. In other words, the more a brand owns attributes with high relative importance, the greater the power score. Originality: How original are you? For any given respondent, a brand is considered to be an original in a product attribute if it is the only brand in the brand list he/she associates with that attribute. Profile: How well do Canadians know your brand? Brand profile score is the overall average percentage of association across all product attributes for each brand. Local/ Regional Hospital/ Foundation

29 Step #1: Attributes Associated with Canadian Cancer Charities 29 Funds cancer research Provides reliable information about cancer Promotes information about healthy lifestyles that help prevent cancer Cares about people Has an excellent reputation Provides support services that improve the quality of life Makes a real difference Is an organization that I trust Has a long history of success Influences governments for changes in public policy and allocation of resources to fight cancer Effectively uses donor dollars Is active in my community Engages in interesting fundraising initiatives Is transparent in their financial practices Is inspirational Is the organization where I would want to volunteer my time Base: All respondents who have heard of at least 1 charity (n=999) Q10Please indicate all the organizations you think the statement describes. CCS differentiates itself from the competitive set the most in the following categories: funding cancer research, providing reliable cancer information, promoting information about healthy lifestyles and influencing government policy. The organization lags behind the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation and the Terry Fox Foundation in its perception as an inspirational cancer charity and engaging in interesting fundraising initiatives.

30 Canadian Cancer Charities: The Landscape 30 Base: All respondents who have heard of at least 1 charity (n=999) Q10Please indicate all the organizations you think the statement describes. While CCS is the brand most associated with attributes related to funding cancer research and providing information, other organizations are more closely linked with “softer” attributes including being “inspirational” and motivating volunteerism. Local/Regional Hospital/Foundation

31 What are the brand attributes that DRIVE whether or not someone will donate to a cancer organization? Step #2: Relative Importance of Attributes

32 32 Step#2: Relative Importance of Attributes * These importance scores are the result of a Shapley Value regression for which the overall R2 value (extent to which support is explained by the attributes) is 18%. The first aspect of the BAM analysis is to determine which attributes are the most powerful overall in terms of driving likelihood to give to cancer organizations. It is clear that some attributes are more powerful drivers than others. In particular, an organization that is trusted and where people would want to volunteer their time are particularly powerful drivers of this behaviour. Among the measured attributes of cancer organizations, “an organization where I would want to volunteer my time” is 15% of the driving force behind why someone would donate to a specific cancer organization. Relative Importance

33 33 Importance Association The variables in this quandrant are successes High Association Low Importance High Association High Importance Low Association Low Importance Low Association High Importance The variables in this quandrant represent important opportunities The variables in this quadrant represent weaknesses but are not priorities The variables in this quadrant represent strengths but are not priorities Step#2: Analyzing CCS’s Brand Association Interpretation of Quadrant boundaries

34 CCS’s area of brand success is perceptions of the organization’s trust, reputation and ability to make a difference. The organization’s area of opportunity is to be a place in local communities where Canadians want to volunteer their time in interesting fundraising initiatives Importance Association with CCS Highly Associated Less Important Highly Associated Very Important Low Association Less Important Low Association Very Important 34 R 2 : 18% Step #2: Analyzing CCS’s Brand Association Quadrant Analysis: Importance x Association

35 35 Step #3: BAM Analysis - Profile As evidenced with previous metrics regarding awareness and familiarity, CCS differentiates itself from the other organizations in its overall profile. By virtue of have the highest level of association in almost all metrics, CCS also leads in overall Profile. Profile: how well do Canadians know your brand? Brand profile score is the overall average percentage of association across all product attributes for each brand.

36 36 Step #3: BAM Analysis - Originality Perceptions of CCS as an original brand falls below that of The Terry Fox Foundation and the regional hospitals/foundations. This is not surprising considering the highly individualized nature of regional hospital and the unique identity of the Terry Fox Foundation. While the Canadian Cancer Society leads in almost all of the measured attributes it does not “own” any of them. By contrast, The Terry Fox Foundation’s ownership of the inspirational category contributes to its originality score. Originality: how original are you? For any given respondent, a brand is considered to be an original in a product attribute if it is the only brand in the brand list he/she associates with that attribute.

37 37 Step #3: BAM Analysis - Power In terms of overall power – the most important score in the BAM analysis – the Canadian Cancer Society edges out the rest of the competitive set. While the lead is marginal, CCS’s high Profile on the most attributes ensures that it is more likely to have the advantage of “owning” the attributes that drive brand choice. By comparison, while local hospitals and the Terry Fox Foundation were more likely to own attributes (in particular inspiration)- this attribute is not one that factors heavily in diving brand choice. Power: How much do you own the attributes that drive brand choice? The data from the brand association exercise is metricized to increase the differentiation between ratings among brands across respondents. In other words, the more a brand owns attributes with high relative importance, the greater the power score.

38 Employee Experience with CCS Brand

39 Objectives and Methodology 39 From July 23 rd to August 6 th 12 th 2013, Angus Reid Public Opinion hosted an online survey on behalf of Canadian Cancer Society (CCS). This survey acted as a follow up to the first wave of research conducted October 3 rd to October 12 th 2012. This post-wave of research follows the release of the organizations Visual Identity Guidelines (VIG). In addition to obtaining employee react to the VIG, the purpose of this study was to obtain feedback from Canadian Cancer Society employees on their connectedness with the Society and its mission. A total of 599 employees completed the survey, which was distributed as an “open link” by provincial divisions. Completed responses obtained through the national office and the provincial divisions are distributed as follows: Total National Office BC & YK AB & NWT SKMBONPQNFLDNBNSPEI Number of Completes (Post Wave) 5995510646218219771716277 Number of Completes (Pre Wave) 6157592763117209449292310

40 Connection to CCS Three-in-five report a high level of connection to the organization, unchanged from before Visual Identity Guidelines were introduced. 40 Base: n=599 Q1. Overall how connected do you feel with the Canadian Cancer Society as an organization? Connection to CCS Average = 7.6 (No change from Pre Wave data) Extremely connected 10 point scale How connected do you feel with the CCS as an organization? not at all connected 3% Indicated 1, 2, 3 39% Indicated 4, 5, 6, 7 58% Indicated 8, 9, 10 Pre Wave Data 56% 41% 3%

41 41 Viewership of CCS’ Brand Standards Presentation One-half of CCS employees recall seeing the brand presentation. Divisional Employees were more likely than regional counterparts to have seen the presentation, as were those in BC&Y and PEI. Those who have been with CCS for less than a year were least likely to have seen it. Base: n=599 Q2. Did you see or receive the CCS brand presentation “Understanding the Brand From the Inside Out”? Did you see or receive the CCS brand presentation “Understanding the Brand From the Inside Out”? Connection to CCSYears Worked at CCS LowMediumHighLess than 1 year1-2 years3-5 years6-10 years More than 10 years Yes 32%41%58%34%64%51% 54% n= 106 n= 46 n= 8 n= 21 n= 219 n= 77 n= 16 n= 27 n= 7 n= 17 n= 55 Note: Interpret regional data with caution due to low base sizes

42 42 What is the Society’s Mission Statement? In Their Own Words Base: n=599 Q5. What, to the best of your knowledge, is the Society’s mission statement? “Deter - reduce the incidence of cancer Defeat - Reduce the mortality from cancer Defy - support people living with cancer” “Our mission is to end cancer, as well as to help, aid and improve people's lives as they go through their personal cancer journey.” “deter, defy, defeat - eradicate cancer and enhance quality of life” “Enhance the life of cancer patient while doing research, prevention and education” “Create a world where no one fears cancer” “Find a cure for cancer and support those impacted by cancer” “The Canadian Cancer Society is a national community-based organization of volunteers whose mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of the quality of life of people living with cancer.” “The Canadian Cancer Society is a national grass-roots organization dedicated to the eradication of cancer, enhancing the lives of those living with cancer and creating a world where no one fears cancer.” “Our mission is the eradication of cancer, enhancing people's quality of life who are living with cancer. We do this by researching for a cure, teaching people about awareness and healthy living, extending services in the community and advocating for better laws. We do this with the help of volunteers and staff.”

43 43 Main Four Priorities of CCS Research, public policy, engagement and cancer eradication remain consistent between Pre and Post roll-out of the Visual Identity Guidelines as the areas identified most often as CCS’ priorities Base: n=599 Q6. As you may know, there are four main priorities to our work at the Society. To the best of your knowledge what are these four main priorities?

44 Key Conclusions Canadian Cancer Society is an organization that is well known to Canadians and considered to be the top Canadian cancer charity when it comes to delivering on various functions associated with this type of organization. – CCS benefits from some of the foundational elements of donation behavior – familiarity, affinity and previous donation commitment. These, however, do not differentiate it from other cancer charities. Personal connection to cancer is pervasive and essential to decoding donation behaviour, however it does not assist in differentiating between the various Canadian cancer charities competing for donation dollars; Analysis of donation motivation to Canadian cancer charities reveals that important donation drivers include qualities like interest in volunteering for the organization and engendering trust. CCS does not currently “own” these attributes; –By contrast, the attributes that CCS does “own” are not the strongest drivers of donation behaviour, including funding cancer research and providing information. Findings suggest that there is an opportunity for CCS to capitalize on its status as an effective organization in the fight against cancer to inspire Canadians to want other personal connections with the organization, including volunteering and experiencing the organization at the community level. As front-line representatives of the organization, employees express a good understanding of the organization’s mandate, but need corporate presentation and collateral reinforced to crystallize the brand. 44

45 For more information, please contact: JODI SHANOFF Senior Vice President, Public Affairs Angus Reid Public Opinion TM 2 Bloor Street East, Suite 1700 Toronto, Ontario M4W 1A8 P: 416.642.7699 F: 888.311.2554 E: jodi.shanoff@angus-reid.com JODI SHANOFF Senior Vice President, Public Affairs Angus Reid Public Opinion TM 2 Bloor Street East, Suite 1700 Toronto, Ontario M4W 1A8 P: 416.642.7699 F: 888.311.2554 E: jodi.shanoff@angus-reid.com DEMETRE ELIOPOULOS Senior Research Manager, Public Affairs Angus Reid Public Opinion TM 2 Bloor Street East, Suite 1700 Toronto, Ontario M4W 1A8 P: 416.642.4388 F: 888.311.2554 E: demetre.eliopoulos@angus-reid.com DEMETRE ELIOPOULOS Senior Research Manager, Public Affairs Angus Reid Public Opinion TM 2 Bloor Street East, Suite 1700 Toronto, Ontario M4W 1A8 P: 416.642.4388 F: 888.311.2554 E: demetre.eliopoulos@angus-reid.com


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