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KREAMER’S BIOLOGY MUSEUM Welcome to the Plant Kingdom Exhibit. (Kingdom Plantae) Nonvascular Classification Start Here Curator’ s Office Vascular Chloroplasts.

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Presentation on theme: "KREAMER’S BIOLOGY MUSEUM Welcome to the Plant Kingdom Exhibit. (Kingdom Plantae) Nonvascular Classification Start Here Curator’ s Office Vascular Chloroplasts."— Presentation transcript:

1 KREAMER’S BIOLOGY MUSEUM Welcome to the Plant Kingdom Exhibit. (Kingdom Plantae) Nonvascular Classification Start Here Curator’ s Office Vascular Chloroplasts & Chlorophyll Most plants have cell walls and green cell parts called chloroplasts.

2 Return Welcome to Mr. Kreamer’s Biology Museum. The information contained within is meant to help you understand the Plant Kingdom. Click on an arrow to travel from room to room. Click on a picture to get more information.

3 Chloroplasts & Chlorophyll Most plants have cell walls and green cell parts called chloroplasts. Photosynthesis Photosynthesis is the process in which plants use water, carbon dioxide, and energy from the sun to make food. Welcome to the Plant Kingdom Exhibit. Plant Features LobbyGrouping

4 How are Plants Grouped Retur n

5 Mosses and Liverworts Return to Lobby Mosses and Liverworts depend on diffusion and osmosis to move materials from one part of the plant to another

6 Ferns Lobby Conifers Flowering Plants

7 Conifers Return Conifer Life Cycle Conifers

8 Flowering Plants Return

9 Photosynthesis Return to the Room

10 Chloroplasts & Chlorophyll Chloroplast - cell parts that contain the green pigment chlorophyll. Chlorophyll - a chemical that gives plants their green color and traps light energy. Return to the Room

11 How are Plants Grouped There are two groups of plants. (or divisions) The two groups of plants are based on whether or not they have cells that form tubes through the length of the plant. The tubes allow water and minerals to move up and down in the plant and to allow food to move from the leaves to the other parts of the plant. The two divisions are vascular and nonvascular plants. Return to the Room

12 Vascular Plants Vascular Plants are plants that have tube- like cells in their roots, stems and leaves to carry food and water. Return to the Room

13 Nonvascular Plants Nonvascular plants do not have tube-like cells in their stems and leaves. Return to the Room

14 Moss Mosses have fine, soft stems that often grow upright in mats. Some mosses form mats but have stems that creep along the ground. The leaves of mosses are only one or two cells thick and will dry out if taken from their moist environment. Mosses can be classified by the shape of their leaves. Mosses’ leaves grow all around the stem. Return to the Room

15 Liverworts Many liverworts don’t have roots stems, or leaves. The body of the liverworts is often flat, slippery layer of green cells that lies close to the ground. Some species of liverworts have creeping stems and small leaves. Leaves grow in two or three flattened rows along the stem. Return to the Room

16 Life Cycle of Moss Spores are released from the spores capsule. If spores land on suitable ground they will grow into leafy plants. The plants develop male and female organs. Sperm and eggs are formed. Sperm swims to the egg and fertilizes the egg. Fertilized eggs develop into spore capsules. Return to the Room

17 Xylem cells carry water and dissolved minerals from the roots to the leaves. Phloem cells carry food that is made in the leaves to all parts of the plant. Return to the Room

18 Fern Life Cycle Spores cases are found on the underside of the leaf. When the spore cases open, the tiny spores are carried by wind and water. If a spore lands in a moist place, it grows into a small, flat, heart- shaped plant. The heart-shaped plant produces sperm and egg cells. The sperms cells swim through the water to egg cells on the underside of the plant Each egg cell is fertilized by one sperm cell. The fertilized egg develops into a new fern with roots, stems, and leaves. Return to the Room

19 Ferns A fern is a vascular plant that reproduces with spores. At one stage of the life cycle of a fern it does not have a vascular system at all. The leaves of a fern grow a stem that is horizontal and lies underground. The stem stores food and water. Small roots grow down from the plant and take-up water and minerals from the soil into xylem cells. Return to the Room

20 Pine Cone Spruce Cone Douglas Fir Cone Return to the Room A conifer is a plant that produces seeds in cones.

21 A seed is the part of a plant that contains a new, young plant and stored food. An embryo is an organism in its earliest stages of growth. The seed coat, or outer skin, protects the embryo, which contains all the parts needed to form a new plant. The endosperm nourishes the embryo until it can make its own food. The endosperm of a monocot contains one cotyledon, and that of a dicot has two cotyledons. Return to the Room

22 Life Cycle of a Pine Tree Pine trees produce male and female cones. The male cones produce pollen. Pollen are the tiny grains of seed plants in which sperm develop. The sperm cell fertilizes the egg cell and the seeds containing the embryo form between he woody scales of the cone. When the seeds are ripe, the cones become dry and the woody scales open, allowing the seeds to fall to the ground. When the conditions are right, each seed grows into a young plant. Return to the Room

23 Conifers can live in many more places than most other plants. They can live in very wet areas, the desert, on high mountain slopes or close to the sea. In the United States, conifers make up the largest segment of lumber production. Conifers are used to make paper, and is the source for turpentines, disnfectants, and fuel. Conifers also provides food for animals such as birds, insects, squirrels, rabbits and many others. Return to the Room

24 A flowering plant is a vascular plant that produces seeds inside of a flower. The flower is the reproductive part of the plant. Return to the Room

25 There are many more kinds of flowering plants in the world than non-flowering plants. Not all flowering plants have big, sweet-smelling flowers. Many flowering plants have small, non-showy flowers. Some flowering plants produce flowers only certain times of the year. Flowering plants are important to us because they provide food for animals and the oxygen they give off is needed by plant and animals for cellular respiration. (The air we breathe.) Return to the Room

26 Oops!! I’m sorry but this room is unavailable. Please head back out to the museum and enjoy the exhibits. Return to Lobby


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