Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

© Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why, Where and How to Use XML Target Audience: Technical Communicators Presented.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "© Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why, Where and How to Use XML Target Audience: Technical Communicators Presented."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why, Where and How to Use XML Target Audience: Technical Communicators Presented at “XML in the Real World” workshop November 8 th, 2002 Rochester, NY Dorothy Hoskins, principal, Textenergy LLC

2 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood What we’ll cover today Business reasons for using XML How XML impacts writing and production workflows, job trends, tools, implications XML basics with hands-on exercise XSL basics with hands-on exercise

3 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML and the Writing Environment Part 1 of “XML Under the Hood” Business reasons for using XML How XML impacts writing and production workflows, job trends, tools, implications

4 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML: Wave of the Future? When HTML was new, no one anticipated how pervasive and disruptive the technologies would be. HTML conquered obstacles to delivering content anywhere in the world, any time. Did you accept its limitations and dive in? Are you doing web work but wish you weren’t, because the quality isn’t what you want? Is XML any better?

5 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML: Wave of the Future? XML does not solve web presentation problems. It does make it possible to create content for both web and print delivery simultaneously. XML is much more powerful, flexible and robust than standard HTML. XML can be counted on to acquire more uses, drive new tools, and be as unexpected in its impact as the web was in the 90’s. You can choose to: –jump on the wave now, –wait for the initial crest to pass –ignore it and hope you don’t have to swim later.

6 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why Is XML Getting So Much Buzz? XML meets many business needs. XML creates “neutral” content sources. XML is web-friendly (and almost print-friendly). XML underlies Microsoft.Net and other web services, and expands the interoperability of programming exponentially. Everyone’s doing it: legal, automotive, pharmaceutical, government/regulatory, open source community, leading developers (Sun, IBM, Microsoft, Adobe, Quark, Corel, etc.)

7 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why Does Business Like XML? XML is open-source, non-proprietary By creating XML, businesses can exchange information between different computing platforms/OS, among different applications XML can be served to users on-line, in print, even to cell phones and PDAs from the same source materials (aka “content”) –The visual representation (“presentation”) can be changed without altering the content itself

8 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why Does Business Like XML? XML is used for representing narrative content, data records, even processing instructions. Makes integration of business processes seamless across enterprise, with partners and channels For publishing, makes print and web efforts more congruent and synchronized, permits personalization of content by user profiles Provides faster time to market, fewer errors that could result in customer anger/lawsuits Now often used for regulatory filings and to comply with government systems (SEC, FDA)

9 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why Does Business Like XML? Bottom-line results can be impressive after initial investment to create content creation and production workflows. Often pays for itself in 6-12 months. May permit more work to be done by fewer production personnel, allow “writers to write” instead of formatting content. Excellent solution for remote workers via web-based interfaces.

10 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why Do Publishing Depts. Like XML? Provides reliable, systematic content development process for consistent output Reduces rework by writers and production staff, increases accuracy Streamlines output to multiple formats Integrates print publishing with web site development, can be dynamic theoretically faster + cleaner + easier

11 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why Do Publishing Depts. Like XML? Makes translations more accurate, easier to track progress Reduces training time for new hires to get up to speed by providing template-based authoring tools –Designers make presentation templates –Information specialists make structures –Writers create value in content theoretically faster + cleaner + easier

12 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Content management and single sourcing “Content management” generally refers to a system to store content (as docs or chunks), locate it for reuse, track revisions and work history. CM combines a database with management software. “Single sourcing” generally refers to methods for developing content in a controlled method that can be delivered in multiple formats without “tweaking”. SS is often application-based (i.e., FrameMaker, WebWorks Publisher, AuthorIT). –Single source applications and content management systems can be used together. SS is “author-centric”, CM is “admin-centric”

13 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Content management and single sourcing Trend is for CM and SS solutions to become XML- enabled (provide ways to consume and produce XML) to integrate w/ other business processes Often, products are bundled: authoring tool, repository (database), management tools for control of access/approvals and version tracking, publishing automation tools. High-end solutions are enterprise CM systems such as Documentum, Arbortext. Lower-end are usually combinations of custom-built and COTS software.

14 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Content management and single sourcing Businesses may need a CMS to achieve critical control of the content creation and delivery processes (especially true when web is a vital part of the business model). Pub dept. may need SS to meet business demands for speed, quantity and accuracy. Pub dept. cannot make SS or CM work without management support/resources

15 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Pub dept. pain points “Pain points” are roadblocks to getting your jobs done. They can arise from difficulties in doing your job as a writer, getting approvals, finding materials to work with, “version hell”, translation cycle times, reformatting for different output needs. Pain must be significant to move into SS and/or CM. Missed deadlines, budget overruns and lawsuits cause real pain.

16 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Pub dept. pain points Which of these apply to you? [pain point assessment] Can’t find the approved version to start a project. Asked to provide in different file format(s) from original. Have to translate to 5+ languages after approval, but have to reformat all translated materials, cut/paste. Have to key in edits from hard-copy corrections. Old files in formats that are not used now. Can’t collaborate on same file. Can’t access files away from office. Can’t tell who worked on file, what changed when. Can’t go back to previous version of content. Need to make different content versions for different user populations (part common content, part customized), maybe “conditional” acc. to Euro, Asian, American markets).

17 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML is not a cure-all The role of XML is providing content in an “application neutral format” that can be used by an incredible variety of applications on UNIX, Windows, Mac, Linux. Since it’s just a text-based encoding system for marking up information, it requires tools for authoring and production. (WYSiWYG tools are just getting useful.) –XML requires formatting templates for all presentation outputs. Template creation requires skilled developers. It doesn’t create value by itself. It has to be used well. –XML must be “valid” to meet critical business needs; it must conform to set of established rules (a DTD or schema) for validated processing.

18 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML Must Fill a Business Need To sum up, XML is used to improve business processes and provide efficiencies in working with disparate OS and applications. XML makes it easier to integrate CM and SS with current applications and databases. It’s “under the hood” of many tools already. Should you use XML? Assess your situation, plan for migrating if it will meet your needs. First steps: clean up your documents, control your authoring processes.

19 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood A Word about DTDs and Schemas Document Type Definitions (DTDs) come from SGML. DTDs provide rules for the allowable elements and attributes in a document, their order and number of occurrences. Schemas in XML provide the same kind of rules, plus “data typing” to control whether content is in string, numerical, date, etc. data types. DTDs prevail at present in publishing. Schemas are fast taking over in web- and data-oriented applications.

20 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML and the Writer/Producer Good news: Unless the business drivers and pain points are significant, you can wait for better tools and you don’t have to code XML yourself. Bad news: Your usual ways of doing your job aren’t sufficient productive to continue.  –Management will not continue to pay writers to format content (estimated 30% of your job today). –You’ll have to come to grips with automation of formatting, learn new ways to write, accept the Darwinism of the market (“adapt or die”).

21 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML and the Writer/Producer New concepts to learn: –Content in context –Reuse of content at sub-document level –Presentation not tied to writing New tools to use: –Single-sourcing applications –Databases and query languages New work opportunities to explore: –Specialize in information design, content analysis, template design, content administration, training –Be an expert on indexing, production tool, ss application

22 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood The State of Authoring Tools For “structured writing”: –FrameMaker meets tech manual needs best. –Quark Xpress and Adobe InDesign are useful for newsletters, datasheets. –MS Word (with 3 rd -party tools) is for content providers who don’t have or need better publishing applications. –Star Office is XML-enabled office suite, imports/exports MS Word docs, very reasonable price ($89) For XML authoring directly: –XMetal (now owned by Corel) –XML Spy from Altova.

23 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood The State of Authoring Tools Those who already know how to build and use a FrameMaker + SGML “structured application” will find it easy to adapt for XML. Those who use non-SGML FM must learn to write in structured manner. Also someone must create DTD, EDD, read-write rules (usually a consultant or in-house specialist). –Application developers are now making server products (database + management) for automating production from their applications. The Adobe one is called “Framemaker Server” for networked FM work.

24 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood The State of Authoring Tools FrameMaker has “save as XML” and “save as HTML”, both through mapping tables –Mapping may need an FM expert to set up (tedious). –FM does not have tools for mapping XML to HTML. –Also tools for creating advanced PDF documents (maintain hyperlinks, auto-generate TOC) and tagged PDF files (reflowable to adjust to different screen sizes).

25 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood The State of Authoring Tools Quark Xpress allows “drag and drop” mapping between the Quark paragraph tags and the elements of a DTD, XML export after mapping. XML import within Quark is “roundtrip”, but the XML produced may cause problems with other tools. Poor web page production tools (v.5). Adobe InDesign has similar graphical mapping tools, also requires DTD, has better XML output. Also integrated w/ advanced PDF production, has “save as HTML.”

26 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood The State of Authoring Tools Converter applications have been developed for turning docs into XML (MS Word, FrameMaker, Quark Xpress, WordPerfect). –Require a consistent authoring process, may be guided by a writing template. –Most appropriate for small docs, not big books. Really shines for forms, reports. Conversion specialists can do bulk conversion of “legacy content” if there are many docs that must be converted in a short time. Pubs dept. should evaluate all conversion needs, do triage, phase in, “don’t convert what you won’t use”

27 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood The State of Authoring Tools No single tool provides all the quality we want, all the advanced capabilities we are looking for, all the output formats we need -- yet. Decide on tools after you decide on processes, which should be determined by evaluating how you do things now and how you want to do them in future. Analyze > plan > implement. Plan on training on tools, information design, template development, new writing concepts.

28 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML and XSL Part 2 of “XML Under the Hood” Basic XML: Structure and Meaning Basic XSL: Transformation for Presentation Including Hand-On Exercises

29 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood eXtensible Markup Language is the markup language for describing an information structure (hierarchy) and its meaning (semantics) XML does not provide formatting information (fonts, colors, placement) XML can be valid (adhere to a Document Type Description or schema), must be well-formed (written in correct XML syntax) –More flexible than SGML, more stringent than HTML What’s XML?

30 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML is a declarative language Each XML document must start with a declaration of its document type and version in XML syntax. –Encoding (optional in declaration) is UTF-8 by default, can be UTF-16 or other. The declaration lets a parser know that it’s working with an XML document that conforms to a version of the XML spec at W3C. –Parsers handle XML differently (MS vs. Apache, etc.)

31 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML describes structure Each XML document must have a root element that encloses all other elements (user-named). The root element name is whatever you like. Often represented as a “tree” structure. Each element within the structure is a node. –Nodes with children are “branches ” –Nodes without children are “leaves” This is the actual content. Another leaf node, no children.

32 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML provides meaning and metadata The hierarchical structure of the xml document is tagged with meaningful names about the information contained in it. –May be generic, quasi-structural names –May be derived from data tables’ column names

33 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML provides meaning within metadata Some elements may be used to describe information about the information itself. –May be related to work processes –May be related to usage of content –May be related to type of content Information about information is “metadata”.

34 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML metadata provides ways to use information in systems Metadata is used to identify content “chunks” in repositories (aka databases). It can be used to select, filter and order content within a CMS, or via a browser request. –Metadata may be created automatically as part of an authoring or workflow program. –Metadata may never be seen by end-users who receive the content in print or on-line. Mostly used for “library” functions, content management and data interchange.

35 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Put concepts to work Do-it-yourself exercises You’ll need: 1.A deck of cards (in your goodie bag) 2.Paper and pencil (you’ll want to erase) 3.Logic (yours is as good as anyone else’s) That’s all you need to understand and work with XML in the beginning: an information set, a writing tool, and your brain.

36 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Do-it-yourself exercise Take a deck of cards. Look it over and think about the structure of the information it contains. Ask yourself: Bonus: What’s the content? Are there more levels below the second level? What’s the next level element? What’s the root element?

37 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Do-it-yourself exercise Write your own XML structure for the card deck. –Give the root element after the XML declaration. –Write your element structure nested inside your root element. Remember that you have to finish each with a matching closing tag and work in from the outside when nesting elements. This is the actual content. Another leaf node, no children.

38 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Using XML attributes Attributes are descriptive of some aspect or characteristic of an XML element. –Give the element more definition that doesn’t really belong in a sub-element structure. –May be used to create “conditional” output. Creating your own subroutine Open your macro script and insert the following lines of code: Using provided subroutines Navigate to the source code directory and open subex01. Elements are like nouns, attributes are like adjectives.

39 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Do-it-yourself exercise Think about what attributes are used for. Look at your element structure. Ask yourself: What’s the smallest discreet part of the card deck that I want to be able to locate and manipulate? Should any elements in my structure become attributes?

40 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Do-it-yourself exercise Think about using the cards. Look at your element and attribute structure. Ask yourself: Using my structure, could I locate any card in the deck as a unique object? Is there more than one way to describe the structure that is understandable?

41 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Some possible XML structures This example has as the root element, then has the name of the suit as the next level, then has the name of the card, etc. as the third level. –When the element has no content, can represent it as or (both are correct). cards spades clubs king queen jack ten nine eight seven six five four three two ace king

42 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Some possible XML structures This example has as the root element, then has as the next level, then has as the third level. The name of the suite or card is an attribute here. cards suite card

43 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Some possible XML structures This example has as the root element, then has the name of the suit as the next level, then has as the third level. The name of the card is an attribute here. cards spades hearts clubs diamonds card

44 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Some possible XML structures Attributes can be used for each card’s suit (spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs). No card can have more than one suit. No suit = null value (represented by an empty attribute value). The name of the card can also be an attribute; no card has more than one name. Together, these attributes allow for sorting the cards by suit and by name, and can also be used to uniquely identify a card within the deck. Is a name the same as a value in the context of using the cards? cards card

45 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood From structure to presentation When we use XML, the content is “presentation neutral”. There’s no formatting of the text to make it look good, provide visual cues to its organization. FileMe This chapter describes the commands that manage the FileMe internet application. It includes exercises for you to try out the commands yourself. About the FileMe commands structure FileMe commands are organized into three groups: User Commands Admin Commands File Commands You can try out the Admin Commands only if you have Administration level permissions to the server. You can use the User and File Commands if you are a user or an administrator. Please do not alter the exercise files. Copy them into a folder on your own computer before you begin Exercise One: File Commands. Getting started with FileMe Open the FileMe application and log in as a User with the default user name of USER (not case sensitive) and the password begin1 (typed in all lowercase). Open the FileMe application and log in as Admin with the default user name of ADMIN (not case sensitive) and the password begin2 (typed in all lowercase). Open the FileMe application and log in as USER with the default user name of cabman (not case sensitive) and the password begin3 (typed in all lowercase).

46 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Form follows function Each format or layout for presentation can help us understand information – or not. A table format (left), list format (middle), and comma-separated text file format (right) all organize the information. CSV files are meant to be read by machines, not people.

47 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML is readable by people and machines While no one really wants to read XML, humans can if they have to. Computers use parsers to read XML. Browsers can present XML with a default stylesheet, which makes it easier for humans to read. “Pretty printed” XML in IE 5 -> XML in text editor without tabs and line breaks (above)

48 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Where’s formatting come in? How the XML information is visually represented is applied in a separate process. –The appearance can vary widely in the same media or in different media. A variety of paper card decors (left); electronic solitaire (right)

49 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Where’s formatting come in? The best use cases of XML “separate the information from the presentation”. –Even in HTML, when you see a containing inside a, the tag is mostly a layout or presentation tag (creating a table), not an information tag. The browser will provide default presentation of the information in table layout. –XML lets you be more descriptive about the meaning of information, but should not be used to be descriptive about its visual representation (i.e. tag as rather than ).

50 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Writers write; designers format XML in Publishing Workflows “Many writers who are new to structure are uncomfortable with the perceived lack of control over the final document. They have become accustomed to “tweaking” the final output to make it look right. Any implementation of a structured workflow must anticipate some resistance and perhaps even outright hostility from a minority of writers. This resistance seems misplaced, though. Instead of wrestling with formatting problems, writers can focus on content and organization—typically a better fit for writers’ skills and interests than desktop publishing. Working within a structure increases writer productivity and improves the quality and consistency of the final output.” - Sarah O’Keefe, “Structured Authoring and XML” white paper, October 2002

51 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XML in Publishing Workflows XML can be an input to an authoring application, an output from one, and/or an interchange file format. Usually, writers do not work directly with XML. Templates are designed to enable structured authoring (input side) and styled content to users (output side). –Presentation specialists create the templates for print and web, PDAs. –Programmers create the templates for file interchange applications.

52 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Presenting XSL The “XML native” form of template writing is XSL (eXtensible Stylesheet Language). –Written in xml notation, is well-formed xml –Used to convert one xml to another xml, to html, rtf, pdf, ascii text and other formats Most writers do not create XSL, rather they use application-based templates. It is useful to have a working knowledge of what XSL is and how it works if you deal with web programmers and database developers.

53 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Making XSL to Transform XML The most common use of XSL is to transform XML content into HTML. Secondly, XSL is used to to map between database tables and XML structures (change from one DTD or schema into another). –XSL can filter, sort and rearrange XML content, as well as the determine font, color, size, position, etc. of the presentation formatting. An XSL file is called a stylesheet. The rules for transforming each part of the XML into its presentation format are called template rules.

54 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Put concepts to work Do-it-yourself exercises You’ll need: 1.Sheets of colored and white paper 2.Pencil (you’ll want to erase) 3.XML model of the source content 4.List of HTML elements That’s all you need to understand and work with XSL: concept of the map between input and output, a writing tool, and your brain.

55 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Put concepts to work Do-it-yourself exercises 1.Find the XSL worksheet. Look at the XML elements in the left column and the HTML elements in the right column. Some examples of element maps are already given for you. You will make a map for each of the rest of the elements that you want to output to the HTML page. 2.Use small sheets of paper (white and colored) to make a physical model of the structure mapping.

56 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Do-it-yourself exercise Think about what template rules are used for. Look at your XML element structure. Ask yourself: Which HTML element shall I use to present each of my XML elements to the user? Do I want the every piece of content that is in the original XML file to output as HTML? If I need a list, shall it be bulleted or numbered? Are some XML elements just containers that don’t map to a visible HTML output element?

57 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Do-it-yourself exercise The XML source file for the exercise is p.1 of the XSL worksheet packet. Review the template rule syntax in the worked examples on p.2. Write your XML to HTML mapping on p.3 of the XSL worksheet. –Follow the instructions and diagrams on the 4 th page to construct a physical model that shows how elements are sequenced and nested.

58 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XSL Can Be as Complex as Necessary XSL can produce a web page like this: –“Conditional text” can be developed with attributes USER: ADMIN: ANYONE:

59 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XSL Can Be as Complex as Necessary XSL-FO (Formatting Objects) can be used to create entire page layouts with formatted text –inc. page size and margins, columns and gutters, text formatting, table layouts, figure numbers, etc. –multiple page layouts for special cases (title page, left and right hand pages, back matter, etc.) –best for reports, personalized materials built by user selection, auto-generated responses –can be written out as PDF or RTF file formats –“not ready for prime time”, but keep your eyes open

60 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood XSL and CSS Can Work Together Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) files can be used to provide the text formatting (font, size, color, placement) of XML elements — while XSL is used to organize the content output (filter, sort, rearrange). –This “division of labor” keeps the XSL independent of the HTML development, since the CSS can be changed as needed without re-coding the XSL. –CSS is usually applied to whole pages, but XSL might be used only for content pulled from a database into dynamic web pages.

61 © Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood What we’ve covered today Business reasons for using XML How XML impacts writing and production workflows XML basics with hands-on exercise XSL basics with hands-on exercise A lot to think about, and more questions than answers? Stay tuned… Textenergy is available (585)


Download ppt "© Copyright 2002, Dorothy J. Hoskins Textenergy LLC XML Under the Hood Why, Where and How to Use XML Target Audience: Technical Communicators Presented."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google