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Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights Susan B. Anthony “Woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself.”

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Presentation on theme: "Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights Susan B. Anthony “Woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself.”"— Presentation transcript:

1 Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights Susan B. Anthony “Woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself.” By: Krista Adams & Rachel Rolling “The true woman will not be exponent of another, or allow another to be such for her. She will be her own individual self, -do her own individual work,-stand or fall by her own individual wisdom and strength…”

2 Interesting Facts ●Born February 15, 1820 in Adams, Massachusetts ●She was raised as a Quaker ●Had a paper called The Revolution, which was first published in 1868 ●Susan B. Anthony never married and therefore had no children because she was so devoted to being a women’s right activist ●Anthony put up the cash value of her life insurance policy up, so that women could attend the University of Rochester ●In 1872 she registered and voted, later she was arrested, tried and fined for her actions Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights

3 Abolitionist ●Anthony had brothers in Kansas who were anti-slavery activists ●Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison even met at the Anthony farm almost every week on Sundays ●In 1856, she became an agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society. As an agent she organized meetings and speeches as well as handed out leaflets and posters ●Women’s National Loyal League was organized in 1863 by Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton so they could petition and support the 13th Amendment, which outlawed slavery Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights

4 Educational Reformer ●Anthony’s first paying job was the head position of the girls’ department as Canajoharie Academy ●Advocated for coeducation in the state teachers’ convention in 1859 ●Anthony called for equal opportunities for everyone, not just women but for freed slaves as well ●In the 1890s she raised $50,000 in pledges so that women could attend college at the University of Rochester ●She was also on the board of trustees for Rochester’s State Industrial School to advocate for equal opportunities and treatment at schools Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights

5 Labor Activist and Temperance Reformer ●Advocated for equal pay for equal work ●Anthony promoted buying American-made products ●She created the Workingwomen’s Central Association and was elected president in 1870 ●Anthony was part of the Daughters of Temperance where she campaigned for strong liquor laws ●Later in 1853, Anthony along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the Women’s State Temperance Society because they had been refused to speak at Sons of Temperance convention in Albany Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights

6 Suffragist ●Attended her first women’s rights convention in Syracuse in 1852, after being introduced to Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1851 (Stanton was one of the leaders of the women’s rights movement) ●In 1866 Anthony and Stanton founded American Equal Rights Association ●In the 1870’s Anthony campaigned for women’s suffrage on speaking tours in the West ●In 1872 Anthony was arrested for voting, and was fined $100 ●In 1877 she gathered petitions from 26 states with 10,000 signatures, but Congress simply laughed at them Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights

7 Suffragist (cont.) ●Was V.P. of the National American Woman Suffrage Association in 1887, but when Stanton retired in 1892 she became president ●Became honorary president of Carrie Chapman Catt’s International Woman Suffrage Alliance ●After her death, all women in the U.S. over the age of 21 got the vote when the 19th amendment was passed (also called the Susan B. Anthony amendment) in 1920 Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights

8 Women’s Rights Activist ●Advocated dress reform for women ●In 1853 Anthony began campaigning for women’s property rights ●Resulting from her efforts, the NY State Women’s Property Bill became law, married women could now own property, keep their own wages, and have custody of their children ●In 1869 she helped a woman named Hester Vaughn to be pardoned after being accused of murdering her illegitimate child ●In 1857 she attacked the “social evil” of prostitution in a speech in Chicago, calling for equality in marriage, the workplace, and at the ballot box to eliminate the need for women to go on the streets Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights

9 Summary ●Authors of this beautiful powerpoint: Rachel Rolling and Krista Adams ●Susan B. Anthony/Women’s Rights ●Born Feb. 15, 1820, died in Mar. 13, 1906 ●The Problem: Women had very limited rights, and they were seen as inferior to men ●Location: Anthony focused her efforts in New York, where she lived, however she traveled everywhere fighting for different causes she supported ●The Solution: The 19th Amendment granted all women over the age of 21 the right to vote. Anthony led many organizations and she traveled across the country lecturing about women’s rights ●Key Quote: “Woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself.” (Susan B. Anthony) Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights

10 Summary (cont.) ●Accomplishments: o Became agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1856 o called first Woman Suffrage Convention, 1869 o Pledged cash value of her life insurance to meet financial demands of University of Rochester for the admission of women, 1900 o Met w/ President Theodore Roosevelt about submitting a suffrage amendment to Congress, 1905 o After her death, the 19th Amendment, which she wrote, was ratified into the U.S. Constitution (also known as the Susan B. Anthony amendment). The amendment granted the right to vote to all U.S. women over 21, starting in 1920 Fighting for men’s...uhh i mean women’s rights

11 Work Cited “Anthony, Susan B. (1820–1906).” Encyclopedia of Activism and Social Justice. Ed. Gary L. Anderson and Kathryn G. Herr. Vol. 1. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Reference, Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 1 Dec Barry, Kathleen. Susan B. Anthony: A Biography of a Singular Feminist. New York: New York UP, Print. “Biography of Susan B. Anthony.” National SusanB. Anthony Museum & House. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Jan “85 Statement On The Birthday Of Susan B. Anthony. February 13, 1976.” American Reference Library - Primary Source Documents (2001): 1. History Reference Center. Web. 4 Dec “Remarks At A Fundraiser For Republican Women Candidates On The Occasion Of Susan B. Anthony’s Birthday February 15, 1984.” American Reference Library - Primary Source Documents (2001): 1. History Reference Center. Web. 1 Dec


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