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BECOMING AGILE AN INTRODUCTION AND TIPS FOR GETTING STARTED Bob Schommer, CSP, CSPO, PMP Agile Coach September 17, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "BECOMING AGILE AN INTRODUCTION AND TIPS FOR GETTING STARTED Bob Schommer, CSP, CSPO, PMP Agile Coach September 17, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 BECOMING AGILE AN INTRODUCTION AND TIPS FOR GETTING STARTED Bob Schommer, CSP, CSPO, PMP Agile Coach September 17, 2013

2 ABOUT SKYLINE TECHNOLOGIES Microsoft Gold Certified Partner supporting five practice areas including: Business Intelligence, Custom Software Solutions, Enterprise Portals, Online Marketing and IT Business Consulting. Skyline’s IT Business Consulting group: – Builds IT strategies that transform IT from a cost center into a strategic asset; – Integrates IT into official business processes so companies can exploit technology to drive profitable growth, control costs and improve customer service; – Guides and mentors people in best of breed development methodologies, business analysis techniques and quality assurance programs; – Provides certified (PMI and Scrum) program and project managers, senior quality assurance professionals and experienced business analysts. Proud sponsors of PMI-NEW and the Northeast Wisconsin Agile Users Group Credible People, Credible Solutions, Incredible Results!

3 AGENDA Agile Principles Agile Principles The Scrum Framework Slicing the Cake Visualizing Progress (or the lack thereof) Becoming a ScrumMaster Final Thoughts and Questions

4 WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE AGILE? Iterative and incremental development (IID) – Working software in each iteration Evolutionary and adaptive – Inspect and adapt – Visibility Iterative and adaptive planning – Risk driven – Value driven Self managed and self organized teams Time boxed

5 HISTORY 1957: IID was used on NASA’s Project Mercury 1970’s: Successful use on numerous large, life-critical systems (e.g. space, avionic, defense) 1992: Canadian ATC system 1994: DoD adopts new standard that prefers iterative and evolutionary methods 1995: Jeff Sutherland and Ken Schwaber first formalized Scrum 2001: Agile Manifesto emerged during a weekend meeting of seventeen “agilites” in Utah

6 AGILE MANIFESTO “We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.” Individuals and interactions over …processes and tools. Working software over …comprehensive documentation. Customer collaboration over …contract negotiation. Responding to change over …following a plan.

7 AGILE PRINCIPLES Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.

8 AGILE PRINCIPLES Working software is the primary measure of progress. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. Simplicity – the art of maximizing the amount of work not done – is essential. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self- organizing teams. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

9 TRIPLE CONSTRAINT DOES NOT GO AWAY Scope Cost Time Traditional Methods Scope Cost Time Scope drives budget and schedule Agile Approach Budget and schedule drives scope Prioritized by business value It is impossible to fully define requirements until the client actually begins to use the product.

10 AGENDA Agile Principles The Scrum Framework The Scrum Framework Slicing the Cake Visualizing Progress (or the lack thereof) Becoming a ScrumMaster Final Thoughts and Questions

11 SCRUM TERMS ScrumNot an acronym. Sometimes used to refer to the daily stand up meeting SprintAn iteration – typically 2-4 weeks in duration Product BacklogA prioritized list of product features with estimated effort Sprint BacklogDetailed list of tasks that the Scrum Team has committed to deliver during a sprint Scrum BoardUsed by Scrum Teams to track sprint progress – typically a white board with post-it notes Burn DownPublicly displayed chart showing work remaining – either for the sprint or a release

12 SCRUM ROLES Product Owner Product vision Prioritizes work to maximize ROI Determines when to deploy Keeps team “fed” with high value work Scrum Team Self organizingCross functional skills Creates and enforces own ground rules Responsible for commitments Scrum Master Works for the team Coach, Leader, Facilitator, Change Agent Removes impedimentsHas no authority

13 Potential Deployment Sprint Review Sprint Planning 2 Parts: Selection and Decomp Daily Scrum Sprint 2-4 Weeks Team Retrospective Product Backlog & Team Formation THE SCRUM FRAMEWORK

14 Potential Deployment Sprint Review Sprint Planning 2 Parts: Selection and Decomp Daily Scrum Sprint 2-4 Weeks Team Retrospective Product Backlog & Team Formation THE SCRUM FRAMEWORK

15 Potential Deployment Sprint Review Sprint Planning 2 Parts: Selection and Decomp Daily Scrum Sprint 2-4 Weeks Team Retrospective Product Backlog & Team Formation THE SCRUM FRAMEWORK

16 BECOMING AGILE SKELETON Fairly easy to implement Within weeks for many Customers begin seeing improvement HEART Can be more difficult Can take months or years Change in culture, behavior and organization Opportunities are exciting!

17 AGENDA Agile Principles The Scrum Framework Slicing the Cake Slicing the Cake Visualizing Progress (or the lack thereof) Becoming a ScrumMaster Final Thoughts and Questions

18 SLICING THE CAKE

19 SOFTWARE LAYERS Web Application Business ServiceAPIBack Office System Sprint 1Sprint 2Sprint 3Sprint 4Sprint 5

20 CONSIDERATIONS WHEN SLICING THE CAKE Focus on high value features first Code will be “touched” multiple times – There will be re-work There will be changes – Plan for refactoring Multiple test cycles should mean higher quality Expect customer excitement Stop at “good enough”

21 AGENDA Agile Principles The Scrum Framework Slicing the Cake Visualizing Progress (or the lack thereof) Visualizing Progress (or the lack thereof) Becoming a ScrumMaster Final Thoughts and Questions

22 SPRINT BACKLOG – DAY ONE PlannedChecked OutDONE!

23 SPRINT BACKLOG – DAY FIVE PlannedChecked OutDONE!

24 SPRINT BACKLOG – DAY TEN PlannedChecked OutDONE!

25 BOTTOM’S UP PlannedChecked OutDONE!

26 UNPLANNED WORK IS KILLING US! PlannedChecked OutDONE!

27 EVERYONE’S BUSY BUT NOTHING IS GETTING DONE PlannedChecked OutDONE!

28 GETTING TO “DONE” Has “Done” been defined and is it understood? – Checklist – Demonstrable value Three questions work well for co-located, disciplined teams – Focused on getting stories “done” Walk the board to keep focus on the story – Holds team members accountable – Impediments are obvious – Team should lead the discussion Mix it up

29 TECHNIQUES Remember the team should be self managed – Use the retrospective to problem solve – Stress ownership – Any team member can do any task Keep tasks small – No more than 2 days to complete a task Remove impediments Ask questions Coach

30 AGENDA Agile Principles The Scrum Framework Slicing the Cake Visualizing Progress (or the lack thereof) Becoming a ScrumMaster Becoming a ScrumMaster Final Thoughts and Questions

31 BEING A SCRUMMASTER REQUIRES … A servant leadership attitude – “I work for the team.” – Protector of team Maturity – Comfortable with conflict – Hold the team accountable Confidence – Let the team manage themselves – Work yourself out of a job Bravery – Challenge the status quo

32 HIGH-PERFORMING DEVELOPMENT “ENGINE” Product Backlog Feature 1 Feature 2 Feature 3 Feature 4 Feature “n” Raw Materials High Performance Development Engine High Business Value

33 SCRUMMASTER’S ROLE Maintenance, repairs and clean up Optimizes and tunes the “engine” Ensures high quality “raw materials” from the Product Owner Drives organizational change Facilitates Resolves impediments

34 SOME COMMON IMPEDIMENTS Interruptions Environments – Physical – Technical Work space Other team members Organizational –PMO –QA –Managers Product Owner

35 AGENDA Agile Principles The Scrum Framework Slicing the Cake Visualizing Progress (or the lack thereof) Becoming a ScrumMaster Final Thoughts and Questions Final Thoughts and Questions

36 AGILE’S POPULARITY IS A REACTION BY TEAMS TO … Overbearing controls Paperwork Detailed estimates that become reality Project “death marches” Developers want to develop. Testers want to test. Unproductive meetings Forced deadlines Long hours Time not spent developing

37 CHALLENGE THE STATUS QUO Agile is consistent with continuous improvement – Lean for software development Anything that impedes the team should be challenged – Governance – PMO – Even regulatory (Do “just enough” to pass) Impetus for holistic organizational improvements

38 WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU ADDED A TOOL TO YOUR TOOLBOX? Your value to your organization increases when you can solve more and bigger problems –Not every problem is a nail so … –Your solution should not always be a hammer Agile and traditional methods are both viable approaches depending on … –The project –Your organization –Your skills

39 RESOURCES Web Sites – – – – Books – Agile and Iterative Development: A Manager’s Guide by Craig Larman – Agile Estimating and Planning by Mike Cohn – Agile Project Management with Scrum by Ken Schwaber – Kanban and Scrum: Making the most of both by Henrick Kniberg and Mattias Skarin – Succeeding with Agile by Mike Cohn NEW Agile Users Group ( )

40 Bob Schommer


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