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0 Working Together to Address Obesity Maternal and Child Health Bureau Federal/State Partnership Meeting October 17, 2007 LuAnn Heinen Director, Institute.

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Presentation on theme: "0 Working Together to Address Obesity Maternal and Child Health Bureau Federal/State Partnership Meeting October 17, 2007 LuAnn Heinen Director, Institute."— Presentation transcript:

1 0 Working Together to Address Obesity Maternal and Child Health Bureau Federal/State Partnership Meeting October 17, 2007 LuAnn Heinen Director, Institute on the Costs and Health Effects of Obesity National Business Group on Health

2 1 Institute on the Costs & Health Effects of Obesity Build the business case Promote environmental changes at work Reach families– especially children Redesign benefits Communicate the value of change to employers and employees

3 2 Obesity is Weighing Us Down More than a quarter of US health costs are related to physical inactivity, overweight and obesity 27% of the increase in health spending between 1987 and 2001 was attributable to obesity Between 1979 and 1999, obesity-associated hospital costs for children (6-17 years) more than tripled Source: F as in Fat, Trust for America’s Health, 2007

4 3 Medical and Absenteeism Expenditures Attributable to Excess Overweight and Obesity Source: Finkelstein EA, Fiebelkorn IC, Wang G. The costs of obesity among full-time employees. Am J Health Promotion 2005;20(1):45-51

5 4 Total Cost of Employee Illness

6 5 The obesity epidemic has been likened to a “massive tsunami headed to the shoreline…”

7 6 Disparities Rate of death from heart disease 31% higher among blacks than whites and 49% higher among men than women Rates of death from stroke 43% higher among blacks than whites Each year, about 40,000 more women than men have a stroke Geographic variation Rural access issues

8 7

9 8 Unhealthier, Earlier Approximately 177,000 children and teens under age 20 have diabetes 2 million adolescents (1 in every 6 overweight adolescents) have pre-diabetes Obese children as young as 6 may be on their way to heart disease (stiffer arteries and other risk factors as evidence) Emotional health concerns– poor body image, low self-esteem, symptoms of depression

10 9 Health habits of Americans: Are we doing all we can to maintain health? 1. 1.Control weight (normal range): 40% healthy BMI 2. 2.Eat right: 23% eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables each day 3. 3.Be physically active: 22% active at least 30 minutes per day, at least 5 days per week 4. 4.Do not smoke: 75% nonsmokers But…only 3% follow all 4 health habits Source: April 25, 2005 Archives of Internal Medicine analysis of BRFSS survey data

11 10 Common Goals Public health and private sector seek to: increase the health and productivity of Americans avoid unnecessary costs, reduce trend Unhealthy lifestyles are harming America’s competitiveness, readiness, wealth/economic security, productivity and opportunity Productivity impact = disability, absenteeism, presenteeism (lower productivity even when on the job) Lifestyle-related health costs account for an estimated 50% of health care expenditures

12 11 Explaining the Decrease in U.S. Deaths from Coronary Disease, New England Journal of Medicine, June 7, 2007 Conclusion: “Approximately half the decline in U.S. deaths from coronary heart disease from 1980 through 2000 may be attributable to reductions in major risk factors and approximately half to evidence-based medical therapies.” However, “increases in the body-mass index accounted for about 26,000 additional deaths in 2000, and increases in the prevalence of diabetes for about 33,500 additional deaths.”

13 12 Employees are at work for 35% of working hours Stable group environments can support long-term changes Employers have financial incentive to improve employee health Employers and employees benefit Source: Michael O’Donnell, Editor in Chief, AJHP

14 13 What Are Employers Doing? Large employers have a key role 1. 1.Clinical Preventive Services 2. 2.Worksite Health Promotion 3. 3.Environmental Changes

15 14 A Purchaser's Guide to Clinical Preventive Services: Moving Science into Coverage

16 15 Worksite Health Promotion Programs Visible leadership role & employee involvement Health assessments/population and individual reporting Behavior change & counseling interventions Evaluation and continuous improvement

17 16 “Do” Campaign

18 17 “Do” Campaign

19 18 Fast Food does not have to Equal Fat Food Life on the run can include a healthy diet

20 19

21 20 Previous Best Employers for Healthy Lifestyles Winners AetnaAetna Bath Iron Works, A General Dynamics CompanyBath Iron Works, A General Dynamics Company Cisco SystemsCisco Systems Dell, Inc.Dell, Inc. Florida Power & LightFlorida Power & Light Hannaford Brothers CompanyHannaford Brothers Company IBMIBM Johnson & JohnsonJohnson & Johnson Kellogg CompanyKellogg Company Medtronic, Inc.Medtronic, Inc. Motorola, Inc.Motorola, Inc. Pitney BowesPitney Bowes Texas Instruments, Inc.Texas Instruments, Inc. Union Pacific RailroadUnion Pacific Railroad

22 21 Leading Examples IBM rebate programs to support healthy lifestyles J&J nutritionally dense whole foods initiative FPL Group healthy food subsidies General Mills physical activity promotion HEB, Hannaford diverse workforce approaches

23 22 Partnerships Fostering Partnerships Childhood obesity Nutrition education Healthy weight initiatives Physical activity Breastfeeding Prenatal information


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