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Arkansas Teen Book Award: Arkansas Library Association September 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "Arkansas Teen Book Award: Arkansas Library Association September 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Arkansas Teen Book Award: Arkansas Library Association September 2010

2 Arkansas Teen Book Award ArLA Meeting Agenda:  David – Overview of AwardOverview of Award  Rachel – Promotional WikiPromotional Wiki  Randi – Teen VotingTeen Voting  Jana – New BooklistNew Booklist

3 The Steering Committee: Who We Are Jana Dixon, AASL/AAIM Representative,  Cutter Morning Star High School Library Media Specialist David Eckert, Assistant Director,  Jonesboro Public Library Randi Eskridge, Head of Children's Services,  Bob Herzfeld Memorial Library Crystal Long, Library Program Advisor,  Arkansas State Library Jessica McGrath, Head of Adult Services,  Bob Herzfeld Memorial Library Rachel Shankles, AAIM Representative,  Lakeside High School Library Media Specialist

4 The Process (or How It All Works) January to April  Solicit Readers and Book Titles to Consider Send either request to  Book Title Criteria: Unless the book can stand on its own, it must be the first in a series. Copyright date goes by the hardback edition unless it was originally published as paperback. Allow translations going by the US copyright date. Age division will be determined by reviews through School Library Journal when possible. If not, then Booklist, Library Journal, or the discretion of the steering committee will be used.

5 The Process April to August  Assign titles to Levels 1 or 2 Levels will be determined by the largest number of grades covered by the review's indicated grade level. Example: 8 + would be assigned to Level 2 because it covers more grades in that level than in level 1.  Assign Number of Votes to each Reading Group Target number of votes per level is 15 between all reading groups. Allows for some “wildcards.” Based on the percentages of total number of titles per group  Example 1: 74 titles in level 1 divided by 15 = 4.93 titles per every 1 vote  Example 2: 97 titles in level 2 divided by 15 = 6.47 titles per every 1 vote  Assign Readers to Preferred Groups (when possible)  READ, READ, READ!!!

6 Wild Cards (or “free agents”) August to September  Nominate wild card titles  Participating readers read all wildcard titles  Meet before SELA/ArLA conference in September to vote  Great way to meet your fellow reader s!!!

7 Announce and Distribute Lists Titles on the final reading list will be announced at ArLA Distribute lists state-wide by October Promotional material will be available for download at

8 The Process - Years 2 & 3 Year 2  Teens READ – October to October  Teens Vote during Teen Read Week (in October)  Winners announced in December Year 3  In April – Honor 1 winner at the AAIM Conference  In September or October – Honor 1 winner at the ArLA Conference

9 Arkansas Teen Book Award Timelines 2009 (2008 © books) 10/24/09  Meet with Readers  Decide on wild cards  Finalize list & announce at ARLA 10/31/09 Distribute Reading Lists Statewide 12/1/10 Announce Winners 4/20/11 Honor 1 winner at AAIM 10/24/11 Honor 1 winner at ArLA 2010 (2009 © books) 10/24/09 Start soliciting readers & Book titles for next year’s list 4/15/10  Decide on Reading Groups  Distribute Reading lists  READ!!! 9/25/10 Meet with Readers  Decide on Wild cards  Finalize list & announce at ARLA 10/31/10 Distribute Reading List Statewide 12/1/11 Announce Winners

10 Statistics from Year One Total number of Readers: 66  School Library Affiliation: 27  Public Library Affiliation: 26  University Library Affiliation: 11  Individual Reader: 1 Total number of Titles:  Adrenaline (Fiction): 31  Graphic Novels/Manga: 38  Non-Fiction: 36  Realistic Fiction: 67

11 Statistics from Year Two 122 readers this year across both levels 44 readers in Level 1 groups 53 readers in Level 2 groups 25 readers in combined groups (Graphic Novels and Historical Fiction) 179 books this year across both levels 80 titles in Level 1 99 titles in Level 2

12 Teen Reading List Airman Eoin Colfer Audrey Wait! Robin Benway Black Box Julie Schumacher Bog Child Siobhan Dowd Chains Laurie Halse Anderson Curse as Dark as Gold Elizabeth C. Bunce Disreputable History of Frankie Landau- Banks E. Lockhart The Graveyard Book Neil Gaiman Hunger Games Suzanne Collins Impossible Nancy Werlin Into the Volcano Don A. Wood Life Sucks Jessica Abel, G. Soria, W. Pleece No Choirboy: Murder, Violence, and Teenagers on Death Row Susan Kuklin The Savage David Almond, Dave McKean Sun & Moon, Ice & Snow Jessica Day George Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba's Struggle for Freedom Margarita Engle Trouble Gary D. Schmidt Trouble Begins at 8: A Life of Mark Twain in the Wild, Wild West Sid Feleishman Waiting For Normal Leslie Connor What the World Eats Peter Menzel, Faith D'Aluisio Level 1 – Grades 7-9

13 Teen Reading List The Adoration of Jenna Fox Mary E. Pearson The Astounding Wolf-Man (vol.1) Robert Kirkman, Jason Howard Atomic Robo: Atomic Robo and the Fightin' Scientists of Tesladyne Brian Clevinger City of Thieves: a Novel David Benioff Echo: Moon Lake Terry Moore Eat This, Not That! David Zinczeko Farts: A Spotter's Guide Crais Bower, Travis Millard Gadget Nation: A Journey Through the Eccentric World of Invention Steve Greenberg Graceling Kristin Cashore Green Arrow: Year One Andy Diggle and Jock Jellicoe Road Melina Marchetta Knife of Never Letting Go Patrick Ness Little Brother Cory Doctorow Mudbound Hillary Jordan Over and Under Tod Tucker Pitch Black: Don't Be Skerd Youme Landowne, Anthony Horton Playing With Matches Brian Katcher The Secret Story of Sonia Rodriguez Alan Lawrence Sitomer Silver Surfer: Requiem J. Michael Straczynski, Esad Ribic Venomous Christopher Krovatin Level 2 – Grades 10-12

14 Promoting the Award to Teens Book Displays:  Draw attention to the titles on the list. Have the lists available for teens to grab.  Feature “teen picks” each month.

15 Promoting the Award to Teens Contests:  Provide GREAT prizes.  Have teens write book reviews  Host your own battle of the books.  Host an essay contest.  Host an art contest.

16 Promoting the Award to Teens Word of Mouth:  Post teen-written book blurbs around the library.  Have the list handy at all times.  Start a book club.  Create a book crush bulletin board/sign

17 The Future Have teens involved as initial readers Have money to bring in the winners

18 Wikis

19 The Wiki Reading Groups  Each has a wiki to discuss the books  Use of a rating system  Voting  General book discussion mayhem  m

20

21

22 promote - suggest read Please Become involved promote - suggest read Thank You!!!

23 Voting

24 Students will vote at their school/public library for their favorite book from the list during Teen Read Week each year, beginning in 2010, so please purchase the titles, if possible, and have the teens begin reading from the attached list. Teens will have the Arkansas Teen Reading Book Award reading lists available to them from October to October. It is the responsibility of public librarians, school library media specialists and teachers to make this list available to students. Teens will cast their votes up until midnight Oct. 23, 2010 of Teen Read Week.

25 Voting Procedures Voting procedures are simple: Students are required to have read at least one book from the list before voting. Students may vote online at m or mhttp://tiny.cc/arteen Public librarians and library media specialists are responsible for sending their students’ votes to the Book Award Committee to be counted if they choose to use a paper ballot rather than the online voting form. These votes can be mailed to

26 or

27 ARTBA Reading List Fall 2010

28 Reading List Level 1

29 All The Broken Pieces by Anne E. Burg Grade 6–8—In 1977, 12-year-old Matt Pin lives a fractured life. He is the son of a Vietnamese woman and an American soldier and was airlifted to safety from the war zone. Adopted by a caring American couple, he has vivid and horrific memories of the war and worries about the fates of his mother and badly injured little brother. Matt's adoptive family adores him, and he is the star pitcher for his middle school baseball team, but there are those who see his face and blame him for the deaths of the young men they lost in the war. The fractured theme runs the course of this short novel in verse: Matt's family, the bodies and hearts of the Vietnam vets, the country that is "only a pocketful of broken pieces" that Matt carries inside him. Ultimately, everything broken is revealed as nonetheless valuable. While most of the selections read less like poems and more like simple prose, the story is a lovely, moving one. Use this in a history class or paired with Katherine Applegate's Home of the Brave (Feiwel & Friends, 2007).—Heather M. Campbell, formerly at Philip S. Miller Library, Castle Rock, CO From School Library Journal ISBN

30 Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia

31 Because I am Furniture by Thalia Chaltas “Anke’s father is abusive to her brother and sister. But not to her. Because, to him, she is like furniture— not even worthy of the worst kind of attention. Then Anke makes the school volleyball team. She loves feeling her muscles after workouts, an ache that reminds her she is real. Even more, Anke loves the confidence that she gets from the sport. And as she learns to call for the ball on the court, she finds a voice she never knew she had. For the first time, Anke is making herself seen and heard, working toward the day she will be able to speak up loud enough to rescue everyone at home— including herself.” –Amazon Furniture-Thalia- Chaltas/dp/ /ref=sr_1_1?s=book s&ie=UTF8&qid= &sr=1-1http://www.amazon.com/Because-Am- Furniture-Thalia- Chaltas/dp/ /ref=sr_1_1?s=book s&ie=UTF8&qid= &sr=1-1 ISBN

32 The Best Bad Luck I Ever Had by Kristine Levine Grade 6–9—This spirited, early-20th-century coming-of- age story presents a small-town cast of well-drawn characters, an unlikely friendship, engaging adventures, and poignant realizations. When a new postmaster arrives in Moundville, AL, 12-year-old Dit is surprised to discover that Mr. Walker is African American and that his refined daughter knows nothing about baseball, hunting, or fishing. With his best friend gone for the summer and in search of companionship other than his nine siblings he reluctantly hangs out with proper, opinionated Emma, who tags along with him asking questions and trying to keep up. Gradually, Dit begins to respect her independence, intelligence, compassion, and determination. But the harsh realities of segregation and racist attitudes threaten their friendship and open Dit's eyes to injustice. After witnessing the town barber's self-defense shooting of the alcoholic and abusive sheriff, Dit and Emma hatch a plan to save the black man's life. Dit's episodic story resonates with youthful authenticity. Peer pressure and racial barbs weigh on his competitive but sensitive spirit. Dit's insular world expands on drives to Selma with Dr. Griffiths, when the influenza epidemic of 1918 invades Moundville, during his pa's shotgun vigil to protect neighbors from nightriders, and in his shared exploits and lively discussions with Emma. Adult characters offer a range of guidance, perspective, and tolerance that helps shape Dit's understanding of his world. Readers will find humor in his candid account, universality in his dilemmas and blunders, and inspiration in his friendship with Emma and their mutual desire for social justice.— Gerry Larson, Durham School of the Arts, NC From School Library Journal ISBN

33 Chasing Lincoln’s Killer by James L. Swanson Based on rare archival material, obscure trial manuscripts, and interviews with relatives of the conspirators and the manhunters, CHASING LINCOLN'S KILLER is a fast-paced thriller about the pursuit and capture of John Wilkes Booth: a wild twelve- day chase through the streets of Washington, D.C., across the swamps of Maryland, and into the forests of Virginia. "This story is true. All the characters are real and were alive during the great manhunt of April Their words are authentic and come from original sources: letters, manuscripts, trial transcripts, newspapers, government reports, pamphlets, books and other documents. What happened in Washington, D.C., that spring, and in the swamps and rivers, forests and fields of Maryland and Virginia during the next twelve days, is far too incredible to have been made up." So begins this fast-paced thriller that tells the story of the pursuit and capture of John Wilkes Booth and gives a day-by-day account of the wild chase to find this killer and his accomplices. Based on James Swanson's bestselling adult book MANHUNT: THE 12-DAY CHASE FOR LINCOLN'S KILLER, this young people's version is an accessible look at the assassination of a president, and shows readers Abraham Lincoln the man, the father, the husband, the friend, and how his death impacted those closest to him. (barnesandnoble.com) ISBN

34 The Demon King by Cinda Williams Chima Times are hard in the mountain city of Fellsmarch. Reformed thief Han Alister will do almost anything to eke out a living for himself, his mother, and his sister Mari. Ironically, the only thing of value he has is something he can’t sell. For as long as Han can remember, he’s worn thick silver cuffs engraved with runes. They’re clearly magicked—as he grows, they grow, and he’s never been able to get them off. While out hunting one day, Han and his Clan friend, Dancer catch three young wizards setting fire to the sacred mountain of Hanalea. After a confrontation, Han takes an amulet from Micah Bayar, son of the High Wizard, to ensure the boy won't use it against them. Han soon learns that the amulet has an evil history—it once belonged to the Demon King, the wizard who nearly destroyed the world a millennium ago. With a magical piece that powerful at stake, Han knows that the Bayars will stop at nothing to get it back. Meanwhile, Raisa ana’Marianna, Princess Heir of the Fells, has her own battles to fight. She’s just returned to court after three years of relative freedom with her father’s family at Demonai camp – riding, hunting, and working the famous Clan markets. Although Raisa will become eligible for marriage after her sixteenth name-day, she isn't looking forward to trading in her common sense and new skills for etiquette tutors and stuffy parties. Raisa wants to be more than an ornament in a glittering cage. She aspires to be like Hanalea—the legendary warrior queen who killed the Demon King and saved the world. But it seems like her mother has other plans for her--plans that include a suitor who goes against everything the Queendom stands for. The Seven Realms will tremble when the lives of Han and Raisa collide. ISBN

35 Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly “Growing up with six brothers in rural Texas in 1899, 12-year-old Callie realizes that her aversion to needlework and cooking disappoints her mother. Still, she prefers to spend her time exploring the river, observing animals, and keeping notes on what she sees. Callie’s growing interest in nature creates a bond with her previously distant grandfather, an amateur naturalist of some distinction. After they discover an unknown species of vetch, he attempts to have it officially recognized. This process creates a dramatic focus for the novel, though really the main story here is Callie’s gradual self-discovery as revealed in her vivid first-person narrative.” -Booklist Calpurnia-Tate-Jacqueline- Kelly/dp/ /ref=sr_1_1?s=books& ie=UTF8&qid= &sr=1-1 ISBN

36 The Great and Only Barnum by Candace Fleming Step right up! Meet the astounding... the amazing... P. T. Barnum! The award-winning author of The Lincolns: A Scrapbook Look at Abraham and Mary, Our Eleanor, and Ben Franklin’s Almanac brings us the larger-than-life biography of showman P. T. Barnum. Known far and wide for his jumbo elephants, midgets, and three-ring circuses, here’s a complete and captivating look at the man behind the Greatest Show on Earth. Readers can visit Barnum’s American Museum; meet Tom Thumb, the miniature man (only 39 inches tall) and his tinier bride (32 inches); experience the thrill Barnum must have felt when, at age 60, he joined the circus; and discover Barnum’s legacy to the 19th century and beyond. Drawing on old circus posters, photographs, etchings, ticket stubs— and with incredible decorative art by Ray Fenwick—this book presents history as it’s never been experienced before—a show- stopping event! ISBN

37 How to Be a Vampire: A Fangs-On Guide for the Newly Undead by Amy Gray Welcome to the world of the undead! A comprehensive guide to the vampire lifestyle quenches newcomers’ thirst for lore — and tasteful tips. For those who join the decadent realm of the vampire, eternal life holds juicy perks — charm and strength, shape-shifting and flying, telepathy and super- powered senses. But then again, one becomes... so terribly hungry. Is there an etiquette for feeding without causing a scene? How do you set up your crypt? What supernatural foes will make your blood run colder? In this elegant, edgy resource, the newly immortal will find everything they need to know, including: - a quiz to determine your true vampire persona - ways to turn into a vampire — or when a kiss is not just a kiss; and why you should take a look at your family tree - a transformation checklist, including canine teeth and UV sensitivity - a makeup and fashion guide to looking damned good (or just damned) - knowing your weaknesses, from garlic, stakes, and sunlight to a n obsession with counting - 10 signs that your boyfriend is a vampire, including super coolness (body temperature-wise) and a habit of sleeping in - a field guide to vampiric variations around the world and throu gh history (barnesandnoble.com) ISBN

38 Indigo Notebook by Laura Resau

39 Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld

40 The Maze Runner by James Dashner When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his first name. His memory is blank. But he’s not alone. When the lift’s doors open, Thomas finds himself surrounded by kids who welcome him to the Glade—a large, open expanse surrounded by stone walls.Just like Thomas, the Gladers don’t know why or how they got to the Glade. All they know is that every morning the stone doors to the maze that surrounds them have opened. Every night they’ve closed tight. And every 30 days a new boy has been delivered in the lift. Thomas was expected. But the next day, a girl is sent up—the first girl to ever arrive in the Glade. And more surprising yet is the message she delivers. Thomas might be more important than he could ever guess. If only he could unlock the dark secrets buried within his mind. ISBN

41 Meridian by Amber Kizer “All her life, dead and dying things seemed to find Meridian, and eventually she got used to it. But when, on her sixteenth birthday, Meridian is faced with more pain and death than she ever imagined, her parents decide the time has come to whisk her away to a safe place and let her know what she really is: one of the last remaining Fenestra, part-angels who help the dying find their way to the other side. Taking refuge with a great-aunt who shares her talent, Meridian meets, and after a rocky start, falls in love with Tens, who is destined to be her lifelong protector.” –Booklist Kizer/dp/ X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books &ie=UTF8&qid= &sr=1-1 ISBN

42 Messed Up by Janet Nichols Lynch “With all of his biological family members out of the picture, R. D. lives with his grandmother’s former boyfriend, Earl. It’s not much, but it’s par for the course in a life filled with the threats of Latino gang violence and failing eighth grade (again). Then Earl dies. R. D. does the right thing—he calls 911 and they come to take his body—but slowly R. D. realizes that as long as no one else finds out, they can’t send him to a group home. So he begins to teach himself everything he’s always avoided: how to shop, how to cook, how to work, how to pay bills.” -Booklist Janet-Nichols- Lynch/dp/ /ref=sr_1_1?s=bo oks&ie=UTF8&qid= &sr=1-1 ISBN

43 Omnivore’s Dilemma for Kids: The Secrets Behind What You Eat by Michael Pollan A New York Times bestseller that has changed the way readers view the ecology of eating, this revolutionary book by award winner Michael Pollan asks the seemingly simple question: What should we have for dinner? Tracing from source to table each of the food chains that sustain us-whether industrial or organic, alternative or processed-he develops a portrait of the American way of eating. The result is a sweeping, surprising exploration of the hungers that have shaped our evolution, and of the profound implications our food choices have for the health of our species and the future of our planet. (barnesandnoble.com) ISBN

44 Pricker Boy by Reade Whinnem Some stories draw blood. Some truths won’t stay buried. He was human once, or so they say. The son of a fur trapper, he was taunted by his peers and tricked into one of his own father’s traps. By the time anybody found it, the trap’s vicious teeth were empty, pried open and overgrown. It was said the brambles themselves had reached out and taken pity on that boy; that his skin had hardened to bark as thorns grew over every inch of his body. Maybe it’s true and maybe it isn’t. But anyone who knows anything stays out of the woods beyond the Widow’s Stone. That used to be enough. But this is the summer everything changes, as Stucks Cumberland and his friends find a mysterious package containing mementos of their childhood: baseball cards, a worn paperback, a locket. Offerings left behind in the woods years ago, meant to keep the Pricker Boy at bay. Offerings that have been rejected. ISBN

45 Remember Little Rock: The Time, the People, the Stories by Paul Robert Walker

46 Rock and the River by Kekla Magoon “In Chicago in 1968, Sam, 14, obeys his father, an eloquent civil-rights leader who is close with Dr. King and is passionately committed to nonviolent protest. But after King is assassinated and Sam witnesses police brutality toward a friend, Sam follows his rebellious older brother, Stephen (“Stick”), and joins the Black Panthers, whose revolutionary platform is the opposite of the nonviolent philosophy that Sam has been taught at home. Then Sam’s father is stabbed. Will the brothers retaliate with violence?” -Booklist Magoon/dp/ /ref=sr_1_1?s=book s&ie=UTF8&qid= &sr=1-1 ISBN

47 A Season Of Gifts by Richard Peck

48 T-Minus: The Race to the Moon by Jim Ottaviani Question: What happens when you take two global superpowers, dozens of daring pilots, thousands of engineers and scientists, and then point them at the night sky and say "Go!"? Answer: A SPACE RACE! The whole world followed the countdown to sending the first men to the moon. T-Minus: The Race to the Moon is the story of the people who made it happen, both in the rockets and behind the scenes. ISBN

49 Reading List Level 2

50 After by Amy Efaw

51 Demon's Lexicon by Sarah Rees Brennan

52 Fallen by Lauren Kate

53 Fire by Kristen Cashore She is the last of her kind... It is not a peaceful time in the Dells. In King City, the young King Nash is clinging to the throne, while rebel lords in the north and south build armies to unseat him. War is coming. And the mountains and forest are filled with spies and thieves. This is where Fire lives, a girl whose beauty is impossibly irresistible and who can control the minds of everyone around her. Exquisitely romantic, this companion to the highly praised Graceling has an entirely new cast of characters, save for one person who plays a pivotal role in both books. You don't need to have read Graceling to love Fire. But if you haven't, you'll be dying to read it next. ISBN

54 Flash Burnout by L.K. Madigan Blake is the class clown who can spin anything his way with a joke. Or at least, he could before he began to navigate the tricky waters of girls and relationships. Now that he is in a relationship with Shannon, he frequently finds himself out of his depth and wondering what he has done to anger her. His relationship with Marissa is simpler. They are friends who take a photography class together; their teacher refers to Marissa and Blake as "Pretty and Gritty" respectively because of the subjects they choose to photograph. While Marissa is focusing on flowers and beauty, Blake is taking pictures of bleak sidewalks and homeless people. When Marissa recognizes one of the homeless people as her mother, her life is thrown into a tailspin as she tries to rehabilitate her mother. Concerned, Blake finds himself lying to Shannon in order to check up on Marissa. Despite having fallen in love with Shannon, he is drawn into Marissa's world more and more as the situation with her mother makes her vulnerable and strengthens their friendship. Reviewer: Jennifer Waldrop ISBN

55 The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan In Mary's world there are simple truths. The Sisterhood always knows best. The Guardians will protect and serve. The Unconsecrated will never relent. And you must always mind the fence that surrounds the village; the fence that protects the village from the Forest of Hands and Teeth. But, slowly, Mary’s truths are failing her. She’s learning things she never wanted to know about the Sisterhood and its secrets, and the Guardians and their power, and about the Unconsecrated and their relentlessness. When the fence is breached and her world is thrown into chaos, she must choose between her village and her future— between the one she loves and the one who loves her. And she must face the truth about the Forest of Hands and Teeth. Could there be life outside a world surrounded in so much death? ISBN

56 Ghosts of War: True Story of a 19-Year-Old GI by Ryan Smithson Ryan Smithson joined the Army Reserve when he was just out of high school. At age nineteen he was deployed to Iraq. His year in combat changed his life. This is his story. It will change the way you feel about what it means to be an American. ISBN

57 Hate List by Jennifer Brown Five months ago, Valerie Leftman's boyfriend, Nick, opened fire on their school cafeteria. Shot trying to stop him, Valerie inadvertently saved the life of a classmate, but was implicated in the shootings because of the list she helped create. A list of people and things she and Nick hated. The list he used to pick his targets. Now, after a summer of seclusion, Val is forced to confront her guilt as she returns to school to complete her senior year. Haunted by the memory of the boyfriend she still loves and navigating rocky relationships with her family, former friends and the girl whose life she saved, Val must come to grips with the tragedy that took place and her role in it, in order to make amends and move on with her life. (barnesandnoble.com) ISBN

58 hold still by Nina LaCour An arresting story about starting over after a friend's suicide, froma breakthrough new voice in YA fiction dear caitlin, there are so many things that i want so badly to tell you but i just can't. Devastating, hopeful, hopeless, playful... in words and illustrations, Ingrid left behind a painful farewell in her journal for Caitlin. Now Caitlin is left alone, by loss and by choice, struggling to find renewed hope in the wake of her best friend's suicide. With the help of family and newfound friends, Caitlin will encounter first love, broaden her horizons, and start to realize that true friendship didn't die with Ingrid. And the journal which once seemed only to chronicle Ingrid's descent into depression, becomes the tool by which Caitlin once again reaches out to all those who loved Ingrid—and Caitlin herself ISBN

59 The Human Brain Book by Rita Carter The Human Brain Book is a complete guide to the one organ in the body that makes each of us what we are - unique individuals. It combines the latest findings from the field of neuroscience with expert text and state-of- the-art illustrations and imaging techniques to provide an incomparable insight into every facet of the brain. Layer by layer, it reveals the fascinating details of this remarkable structure, covering all the key anatomy and delving into the inner workings of the mind, unlocking its many mysteries, and helping you to understand what's going on in those millions of little gray and white cells. Tricky concepts are illustrated and explained with clarity and precision, as The Human Brain Book looks at how the brain sends messages to the rest of the body, how we think and feel, how we perform unconscious actions (for example breathing), explores the nature of genius, asks why we behave the way we do, explains how we see and hear things, and how and why we dream. Physical and psychological disorders affecting the brain and nervous system are clearly illustrated and summarized in easy-to-understand terms. The unique DVD brings the subject to life with interactive elements. These include a clickable model of the brain's structure that allows the user to zoom in and discover deeper layers of detail, while complex processes, such as the journey of a nerve impulse, are broken down and simplified through intuitive animations. ISBN

60 I’m Down: a Memoir by Mishna Wolff Mishna Wolff grew up in a poor black neighborhood with her single father, a white man who truly believed he was black. “He strutted around with a short perm, a Cosby-esqe sweater, gold chains and a Kangol— telling jokes like Redd Fox, and giving advice like Jesse Jackson. You couldn’t tell my father he was white. Believe me, I tried,” writes Wolff. And so from early childhood on, her father began his crusade to make his white daughter down. Unfortunately, Mishna didn’t quite fit in with the neighborhood kids: she couldn’t dance, she couldn’t sing, she couldn’t double Dutch and she was the worst player on her all-black basketball team. She was shy, uncool, and painfully white. And yet when she was suddenly sent to a rich white school, she found she was too “black” to fit in with her white classmates. I’m Down is a hip, hysterical and at the same time beautiful memoir that will have you howling with laughter, recommending it to friends and questioning what it means to be black and white in America. ISBN www.amazon.com

61 Lady Macbeth's Daughter by Lisa Klein Grade 8 Up—This reworking of Macbeth is told in alternating points of view by Albia, Macbeth's daughter, and Grelach, her mother and Macbeth's wife. Because Albia is born with a crippled foot, Macbeth orders that she be killed. Grelach's servant rescues her, and she is raised by Rhuven's sisters. Albia grows up ignorant of her true heritage, believing herself to be Geillis's daughter. She realizes that she has second sight, and she begins to foresee terrifying, bloody events that are to come. After Macbeth murders King Duncan, Geillis sends her to be fostered by Banquo and his family. As the Scottish kingdom falls into even greater disorder under Macbeth's tyranny, Albia finds out the truth about her birth, and she must decide if she should use her gifts to overthrow her father and help bring order to the realm once again. A number of sections of the book are based directly on scenes from the play. This is a strong feminist reenvisioning of the original that raises issues about the treatment and social positions of women at the time. Grelach, Lady Macbeth, is far more sympathetic than in Shakespeare's version, and Albia is a compelling character who fights for the good of her country and refuses to allow anyone to use her as a political pawn. Klein has gone to historical sources predating Shakespeare's primary source, Holinshed's Chronicles, and has restored some of the history Shakespeare changed, most notably by including the character of Luoch, Grelach's son by her first husband. A great choice for teen book groups.—Kathleen E. Gruver, Burlington County Library, Westampton, NJ From School Library Journal ISBN

62 Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco X. Stork

63 Pluto: Urasawa X Tezuka, vol. 1 by Naoki Urasawa In a distant future where sentient humanoid robots pass for human, someone or some thing is out to destroy the seven great robots of the world. Europol’s top detective Gesicht is assigned to investigate these mysterious robot serial murders—the only catch is that he himself is one of the seven targets. In a distant future where sentient humanoid robots pass for human, someone or some thing is out to destroy the seven great robots of the world. Europol’s top detective Gesicht is assigned to investigate these mysterious robot serial murders—the only catch is that he himself is one of the seven targets ISBN

64 Sandman: Dream Hunters by Neil Gaiman Featuring striking painted artwork, this love story, set in ancient Japan, tells the story of a humble young monk and a magical, shape-changing fox who find themselves romantically drawn together. As their love blooms, the fox learns of a devilish plot by a group of demons to steal the monk's life. With the aid of Morpheus, the King of All Night's Dreamings, the fox must use all of her cunning and creative thinking to foil this evil scheme and save the man that she loves. This book also boasts an eight page section highlighting Yoshitaka Amano's amazing painted art. – ISBN

65 Say the Word by Jeannine Garsee Dredging up the past can knock the present right off balance. The world expects perfection from seventeen-year-old Shawna Gallagher, and for the most part, that’s what they get. She dates the right boys, gets good grades, and follows her father’s every rule. But when her estranged lesbian mother dies, it’s more than perfect Shawna can take. Suddenly, anger from being abandoned ten years ago is resurfacing along with Shawna’s embarrassment over her mother’s other family. As she confronts family secrets and questions from the past, Shawna realizes there’s a difference between doing the perfect thing and doing the right thing. Shawna’s honest and relatable voice will draw readers in and hold them until the last page in this coming-of-age story. Jeannine Garsee has delivered a compulsively readable second novel, perfect for fans of Sarah Dessen and Laurie Halse Anderson. (barnesandnoble.com) ISBN

66 Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater For years, Grace has watched the wolves in the woods behind her house. One yellow-eyed wolf—her wolf—is a chilling presence she can't seem to live without. Meanwhile, Sam has lived two lives: In winter, the frozen woods, the protection of the pack, and the silent company of a fearless girl. In summer, a few precious months of being human... until the cold makes him shift back again. Now, Grace meets a yellow- eyed boy whose familiarity takes her breath away. It's her wolf. It has to be. But as winter nears, Sam must fight to stay human—or risk losing himself, and Grace, forever. ISBN

67 Skunk Girl by Sheba Karim If Nina Khan were to rate herself on the unofficial Pakistani prestige point system – the one she’s sure all the aunties and uncles use to determine the most attractive marriage prospects for their children – her scoring might go something like this: +2 points for getting excellent grades –3 points for failing to live up to expectations set by genius older sister +4 points for dutifully obeying parents and never, ever going to parties, no matter how antisocial that makes her seem to everyone at Deer Hook High –1 point for harboring secret jealousy of her best friends, who are allowed to date like normal teenagers +2 points for never drinking an alcoholic beverage –10 points for obsessing about Asher Richelli, who talks to Nina like she’s not a freak at all, even though he knows that she has a disturbing line of hair running down her back In this wryly funny debut novel, the smart, sassy, and utterly lovable Nina Khan tackles friends, family, and love, and learns that it’s possible to embrace two very different cultures – even if things can get a little bit, well, hairy. ISBN

68 Stitches: A Memoir by David Small A stitch in time can save nine, but Caldecott-winning children’s book author David Small’s unloving parents spared him not a one, as Stitches, his graphic memoir of his harrowing childhood, makes clear. Small was a sickly child, and his radiologist father subjected him to repeated X-rays, believing it would cure his sinus problems. When a lump materialized on his neck, his mother complained about the expense and put off surgery for three years. Small emerged from multiple operations at 14 unable to speak, and only learned later that he’d had cancer. Like Alison Bechdel’s genre-bending Fun Home, Stitches melds ink-washed drawings and incisive captions to tell Small’s devastating story about growing up in a silent, angry household with miserable parents. With its menacing, child’s-eye view of Detroit smokestacks, hospital corridors, and scowling, bespectacled adult faces looming up close, Stitches reads like a silent horror movie. Communication in the Small household was nonverbal: "Mama had her little cough," he opens, which augured her unexplained rages. His father "thumped a punching bag. That was his language." His older brother, who grew up to become a percussionist with the Colorado Symphony, beat his drum. And little David, "born anxious and angry," got sick. David is saved by a wonderful psychiatrist, depicted as Lewis Carroll’s White Rabbit, who helps defang his nightmares -- including his parents -- and makes him realize that drawings are his language. Small writes, "Art became my home. Not only did it give me back my voice, but art has given me everything I have wanted or needed since." Stitches leaves the reader speechless -- stunned at its power and perfect pitch. --Heller McAlpin ISBN

69 We Were Here by Matt de la Pena


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