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Patricia Hamamoto Superintendent January 2007 Informational Briefing Department of Education Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education.

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Presentation on theme: "Patricia Hamamoto Superintendent January 2007 Informational Briefing Department of Education Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 Patricia Hamamoto Superintendent January 2007 Informational Briefing Department of Education Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education

2 Mission of Public Education/ Department of Education To prepare: A literate citizenry for a democratic society A skilled workforce for tomorrow Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education

3 3 Strategic Plan Alignment Goal 1: Improve student achievement through standards-based education. Goal 2: Provide comprehensive support for all students. Goal 3: Continuously improve performance and quality. For every goal, a set of measurable targets is defined

4 4 Achievement Safety & Well-being Civic Responsibility Accountability and Transparency Information Technology Support High School Redesign Highly Qualified Teachers Academic/Financial Planning Principal Leadership training Improving School Community Councils Facilities and Repair and Maintenance BOE Safety Ad-Hoc Committee Service Reporting Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education

5 5 Official Student Enrollment Count RegularCharterTotal 173,5565,678179,234 Regular Education K-6 grades86,1733,10989, grades22,7761,01023, grades45,9961,14047,136 Special Education K-6 grades7, , grades3, , grades7, ,663 Fall 2006

6 Hawaii’s progress in Student Achievement

7 7 Hawaii State Assessment Data for Reading Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education

8 8 Hawaii State Assessment Data for Math Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education

9 9 Poverty is the single predictive indicator for poorer performance Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education

10 10 Poverty factor Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education

11 There are good things happening within the DOE Examples of excellence are emerging… Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education

12 12 Palolo Elementary, Lanakila Elementary and Jarrett Middle Schools have relatively high levels of poverty ESL= English as a Second Language SPED = Special Education

13 13 Yet Growth in Student Achievement is commendable!

14 What works for these schools? Believe strongly that their kids can learn Focus on meeting HSA* goals Deliver rigorous standards-based instruction Do whatever it takes for their kids to meet the goals! *Hawaii State Assessment

15 15 Growing what we’ve learned about Student Achievement… Replicate practices in every school, in every class, across the system Provide the tools to do the work

16 16 Achievement Initiatives: High School Redesign –Rigorous standards based education in all classrooms –Improve transition of middle school students –Data driven decision making –Leadership capacity building through collaboration –Extended Learning Communities through partnerships

17 17 Achievement Initiatives Early Childhood Education Initiatives –Junior Kindergarten has been implemented in all elementary schools (SY ) Schools have protocols and procedures to determine placement of students in either separate or mixed classes, based on developmental needs Pilot schools (SY ) –Retention rate- Jr. K Retention = 10% –37 schools in pilot Act 259 SLH 2005 –$250K released for taskforce – Dec 2006 –$750K not released for Families for Real, Jr. K, and K

18 18 Achievement Initiatives Act 160 SLH 2006 –Science Textbooks Similar to Math textbooks of 2005 All districts were partially funded – 60% of requests were for materials to support elementary education

19 19 Act 160/SLH 2006 Science Textbooks Breakdown by District: DISTRICTREQUESTED AMOUNT ACTUAL FUNDING ALLOCATED Honolulu$1,308,171$380,624 Central$1,347,679$351,813 Windward$604,147$173,393 Leeward$481,384$270,946 Hawaii$1,394,158$388,607 Maui$631,189$239,771 Kauai$266,636$194,846 TOTALS$6,033,364$2,000,000 ONLY 33% of requests were able to be funded Copyright © 2007 Hawaii State Department of Education

20 20 Achievement Initiatives: Recruitment & Retention of Highly Qualified Employees –NCLB-Title IIa- Highly Qualified Teachers –Highly effective teacher = student learns –Principal Leadership training –Shortage of qualified employees –Streamlining OHR Processes

21 21 Leverage strategy - Teacher Retention in the first 5 years ! Alignment with NCLB and Highly Qualified Teacher strategy!

22 22 Safety and Well Being Initiatives: Facilities and Repair & Maintenance Need to maintain adequacy of CIP funds –New schools, Additions –Replacement/ Renovation –Electrical upgrades and air conditioning –Compliance (ADA, EPA, Gender Equity) –Major Repair and Maintenance New CIP Allotment process Under-utilized schools Minor Repairs and Maintenance

23 23 Safety and Well-being Initiatives: (Continued) BOE Ad-Hoc Safety taskforce recommendations Food Services/ Student Meals Student Transportation

24 24 Civic Responsibility Initiatives: Community Service Kids Voting Hawaii Joint Ventures Education Forum Volunteers, Non-Profit Community Organizations, 3Rs Faith Based Partnerships Business Partnerships

25 25 Accountability and Transparency Academic Plan Financial Plan Academic/Financial Plan Approval Complex Areas Resource Allocation and Monitoring State Level Financial Systems development Transparency Monthly reporting Variance Analysis and Resolution Effective Use of Resources SCC* Student Data Student Data Schools *School Community Councils

26 26 Accountability and Transparency Superintendent is committed to student achievement through regular student assessments and early intervention –A school in “Restructuring” must assess students four times per year, with one time being the Hawaii State Assessment (HSA) –All other schools must assess students three times per year, with one time being the Hawaii State Assessment (HSA)

27 27 Information Technology Support SchoolsSystem OCISS OHROBS OFS eSIS – Electronic Student Information System eCSSS- Comprehensive Student Support System Human Resources Sys Time and Attendance Streamlining Financial Information Systems CIP Repair and Maintenance

28 28 Electronic Comprehensive Student Support / Information System Integration of three separate web applications – CSSS, ISPED, SSIS “Single story of the student” with eSIS Phase I – all schools (Jan March 2007) – CSSS and ISPED Phase II – all schools (March 2007 – Sept 2007) CSSS and ISPED enhanced Phase III – all schools ( Oct 2007 – March 2008) SSIS integrated with Phase II –Chapter 19, Hawaii State Assessments, Student Interventions, etc 258 schools integrated with eSIS – July 2008 SY – Charter Schools included

29 29 Act 51/SLH 2004 enables the Transformation of Public Education Reinventing Education Act 51/SLH 2004 enables the Transformation of Public Education Accountability Streamlining Empowerment Improved Student Achievement

30 30 Accountability PrincipalsIV  Performance Contracts for Principals TeachersVII  Teacher National Board Certification program  Salary differential for NBC teachers  Hawaii Teacher Standards Board – 1 position  College of Ed faculty – 8 positions Educational Accountability IX  Assess and track measures of academic achievement, safety and well being, and civic responsibility  Annual Hawaii State Assessment  Fiscal accountability  Evaluations of CAS/ principals  Not less than 70% of operating budget expended by principals

31 31 Streamlining Information Technology Infrastructure III  Funding to improve IT Infrastructure (Support Instructional, student information, fiscal, human resources, and outcome based research systems).  Security and Privacy infrastructure  School Technical Support  eSIS customization  Training Reduction of Bureaucracy VIII  Interagency Working Group creation  DAGS Repair & Maintenance transfer 7/1/04  Hawaii 3R’s transfer 7/1/04  DAGS & DHRD functions transfer 7/1/05  B&F & DOH functions transfers deferred to 7/1/07 – MOU with B&F 6/28/06  AG & DHS transfer repealed by Act 225/06  Single School calendar  Standard Practices (additional streamlining)  Carry over 5% for all EDNs  Fiscal flexibility between EDNs and cost elements

32 32 Empowerment Weighted Student Formula II  Committee on Weights Creation  Weighted Student Formula Phase I Principals IV IX  Principals academy  Principals authority defined  12 month principals  Appropriation for Principal Recall days  Two Separate EO Classifications  Appropriation for ACE* Community Involvement V  Creation of School Community Councils  PCNC** funding for every school Students VI  Math Textbooks  Lower class sizes in K-2  Year round Student Activities Coordinator *Administrator Certification for Excellence **Parent Community Networking Centers

33 33 DOE supports equitable educational opportunity for all students Weighted Student Formula (WSF) is a way to allocate funds to schools based on student educational needs.

34 34 Underlying Assumptions for Equity: 1.Schools with similar students should get a similar amount of funds. 2.Schools with students who have a harder time becoming proficient should get more funds to support their efforts.

35 35 SY Data Indicates: Schools with higher % of economically disadvantaged students, ESL students, and Transient students have lower % of proficient readers Very small schools can cost up to 40% more per student K-2 class ratios Isolated schools Multi-track schools cost more in some operational areas

36 36 Percent of Students with Special Needs 2006 Totals may not be exactly 100% due to rounding Over 50% of our students require more resources!

37 37 Weights for SY Weighted CharacteristicWeight$ Value Economically Disadvantaged.100$ ESL.189$ K-2.150$ Geographic Isolation.005$21.44 Multi-track.005$21.44 School LevelVaries by School Level Transiency.025$ Small School Adjustmentper student under enrollment $400 Value of “1” = $4,288.40

38 38 WSF SY : Under Construction Developing a formula based on – Level of funding at successful schools of various sizes – Level of funding necessary to provide adequate educational opportunities – Appropriate adjustments for small, rural, and unique schools Reviewing categorical programs

39 What is the current DOE Budget?

40 40 How a Dollar is Spent in the DOE (SY Operating Budget – Expense Categories) Salaries and Fringe Benefits $0.65 Utilities, Contracted Svcs, Minor R&M, Instructional Materials, etc. $0.25 Debt Service $0.10

41 41 DOE Operating Budget SY per Act 51/SLH 2004 (excludes Debt Service) 73% Spent by Principals 23% State level Central Services 2% Instructional Support 2% State /Cmplx Area Administration

42 42 DOE Operating Budget SY per Act 51/SLH 2004 (excludes Debt Service) Weighted Student Formula $0.47 Special Education $0.13 Categorical General/ Fed Fund Programs $0.12 Centralized SPED & Related Svcs $0.11 Food Service, Student Transportation, Utilities, Work-order R & M $0.10 Adult Education & A+ $0.02 Instructional Support $0.02 State & Complex Area $0.02 $0.73 Expended by Principals Special & Trust Funds $0.01 $0.23 Centrally Expended for Schools

43 43 DOE Centralized Services –Paying electricity bills and other utilities –Network infrastructure support/development –School food services –Student transportation –Diagnostic services for SPED services qualification –Personnel hiring, recruitment, and recordkeeping –Workers compensation –Unemployment benefits administration –Financial accounting and reporting –IT development, implementation, operations –Litigation support Autism, school based behavioral health, etc. Special education provision and recordkeeping

44 44 Statewide Responsibilities –Strategic Planning –Student Achievement Standards Development –Budget Consolidation –Teacher Certification –Hawaii State Assessments –Policy Development –Internal Audit –Compliance with US DOE and State Regulations –Federal Reporting Requirements –Inter-governmental relationship management

45 The DOE Budget has increased primarily due to the following: The pass-through of fringe benefits and debt service Services to special needs students Transfer of specific programs

46 46 A significant portion of these pass-through costs came from Budget and Finance

47 47 Special Education also expanded in compliance with the Felix Consent Decree

48 48 Most recently, other programs like Facilities Development and Repair & Maintenance were transferred

49 49 Fringe Benefits, Debt Service and Special Education Account for $1 Billion of the Increase in DOE Budget Over the Past 30 Years This is almost 50% of our Operating Budget!

50 50

51 51 Compared to other large school districts Hawaii’s performance per dollar is notable Source: National Center for Educational Statistics Funding– SY Achievement – 2005 Urban Pilot

52 Operating Budget Request Board of Education Budget Request compared to Executive Budget Request Fiscal Biennium 07-09

53 53 Board of Education General Fund Budget Request Compared to Executive Budget FY (Excluding Fixed Costs) ($ millions) BOE-Approved Budget Requests BOE Request Executive Budget Difference Shortfalls $ 32.1 $ 18.7 $ 13.4 Weighted Student Formula NCLB / Restructuring / School Redesign Other Student Needs Infrastructure / Technology Equipment / Facilities Enrollment 4.0 (0.2) 4.2 Risk Management Recurring Items in Act 160/ Continuation of Specific Appropriations Transfers 5.7 (0.2) 5.9 Total $ $ 53.7 $ 71.7

54 54 Board of Education General Fund Budget Request Compared to Executive Budget FY (Excluding Fixed Costs) ($ millions) BOE-Approved Budget Requests BOE Request Executive Budget Difference Shortfalls $ 39.1 $ 23.7 $ 15.4 Weighted Student Formula NCLB / Restructuring / School Redesign Other Student Needs Infrastructure / Technology Equipment / Facilities Enrollment 4.0 (0.2) 4.2 Risk Management Recurring Items in Act 160/ Continuation of Specific Appropriations Transfers 5.7 (0.2) 5.9 Total $ $ 58.0 $ 74.7

55 55 Total DOE Operating Budget Executive Request Grand Total – BOE Request $2,386.1$2,420.8

56 Board of Education Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Budget Request Fiscal Biennium 07-09

57 57 School Building Improvements (Major R&M) – Total Backlog Delink w/ DAGS

58 58 Whole School Renovation Project Eighteen Month Project is on schedule!

59 59 Memorandum of Understanding between DOE and Budget & Finance CIP Allotment Process B&F and DOE agree to use the BOE CIP Priority List established for each fiscal year B&F and DOE agree to use the BOE CIP Priority List established for each fiscal year DOE submits written annual encumbrance plan request to B&F B&F and DOE meet to discuss total amount of moneys that will be allotted and procedures and schedule for allotment MOU is automatically extended MOU can only be terminated if B&F and DOE have mutually agreed to a replacement process for the allotment of CIP moneys

60 LEED Certification Waipahu Intermediate School Cafeteria LEED = Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design –100% Day-lighting of Dining Area –88% of construction waste diverted from Landfill –65% reduction in irrigation water consumption Completed in April 2006 –Architect: Ferraro Choi –Contractor: Okada Trucking Fifth LEED Certified Building in Hawaii

61 61 Waipahu Intermediate School Cafeteria

62 62 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Prioritization Matrix Classroom space is becoming a critical factor in supporting growing communities as well as an influx of special education and behavioral health professionals at the school level. Prioritization Process Health and Safety Classroom Capacity Support Facility Projects State / District Improvements Program Needs

63 63 Department of Education Capital Improvement Program (CIP) FY Budget Request Highlights* * Board approved 34 projects (14 line item plus 20 lump sum areas), totaling $397.7 million. **Other projects include projects such as ADA improvements, asbestos and lead removal, noise/heat abatement, telecommunications, and new facilities at existing schools.

64 64 Board of Education Request Compared to Executive Request Capital Improvement Program (CIP) FY ($ millions)

65 65 Board of Education Request Compared to Executive Request Capital Improvement Program (CIP) FY ($ millions)

66 66 Growing what we’ve learned about Student Achievement… Replicate practices in every school, in every class, across the system Provide the tools to do the work

67 67 Student Achievement Growth

68 68 Mahalo for all your support these past years!


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