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The Swedish Waste Management System. Content  Part 1: –Sweden –Avfall Sverige – The Swedish Association of Waste Management  Part 2 –Waste – a Resource.

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Presentation on theme: "The Swedish Waste Management System. Content  Part 1: –Sweden –Avfall Sverige – The Swedish Association of Waste Management  Part 2 –Waste – a Resource."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Swedish Waste Management System

2 Content  Part 1: –Sweden –Avfall Sverige – The Swedish Association of Waste Management  Part 2 –Waste – a Resource –The Development –Responsibilities –Operations  Part 3 –Overview Model –Infrastructure –Collection –Recovery and Recycling  Part 4 –Waste Economy –Means of Control –Success Factors –Challenges –Vision and Long Term Goals  Part 5 –Waste Management on Export – A new Swedish Platform

3 Important success factors  Waste management is a public service  Clear division of roles and responsibilities  Clear national environmental targets showing the direction and long-term regulations and economical steering instruments  Co-operation between municipalities  Collaboration between public and private sectors  Holistic system view- an integrated part of the sustinable city  Co-operation within municipalites (Waste-, Energy-, Water-, Urban- planning-, etc departements)  A system based on source separation with focus on communication and public engagement  A system based on resource recovery

4 Part 1 Sweden Avfall Sverige – The Swedish Association of Waste Management

5 Sweden  9,5 million inhabitants  km 2

6 Avfall Sverige  The Swedish Association of Waste Management  400 members, primarily within the public sector, but also private enterprises -service providers for the Swedish citizens  Networking, training and lobbying  National member of Cewep, ECN, ISWA and Municipal Waste Europe

7 Part 2 Waste – a Resource The Development Responsibilities Operations

8 Waste - a resource

9 2012: 14,7 TWh district energy -> 20 % of the total district energy in Sweden - the heating need of homes 1,7 TWh electricity – the need of homes 2012: 14,7 TWh district energy -> 20 % of the total district energy in Sweden - the heating need of homes 1,7 TWh electricity – the need of homes 2012: 353 GWh vehicle-fuel produced from foodwaste replaced about 30 millions liters of petrol tonnes biofertilizer produced replacing industrial fertilizer

10 Waste hierarchy

11 Unique results

12 Towards zero landfilling - a 40 years perspective 62 % 1 %

13 Important steps of development  Late 1800: Cholera-epidemic - start of municipal waste management  1950’s: District heating systems developed  1970’s and 80’s: Oil crises - waste is being used for district heating

14 An important part of the energy system Oil Waste heat Biofuels Waste 5 % 1980 Oil Carbon Gas Waste heat Biofuels Peat Waste Heatpumps Electricity 1993 Fossil fuels Biofuels Peat Waste Electricity 2008 Heatpumps Waste heat Source: District energy in Sweden – fuel supply:

15 An important part of the energy system Source: District energy in Sweden – fuel supply: Fossil fuel Biofuels Peat Waste Electricity Heatpumps Waste heat

16 Municipal waste planning compulsory Towards zero landfilling Producers’ responsibility introduced Landfill tax introduced Ban on landfill of combustible waste Ban on landfill of organic waste Household waste to landfill per year (tonnes) National target on food waste recycling 50 %

17 Clear division of roles and responsibilities Producers: Collection and treatment of waste within the Producers Responsibility Citizens/households: Separation and leave/transport waste at indicated collection points Municipalities: Collection and treatment of municipal waste Companies/Indust ries: Handling of own generated waste

18 Plans, regulators, permissions and supervision National level  Parliament  National environmental targets  The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency  National waste plan  Produces national legislation and guidelines  National environmental courts (5 plus one superior):  Gives permissions to larger treatment plants Regional level (21 counties)  County Administrative Board - government authority:  Regional environmental targets  Permissions and control for most treatment plants  Supervision of the regional treatment capacity Municipal level (290 municipalities)  Municipal authorithies:  Local environmental targets  Local waste plans and regulations  Permissions and control of smaller treatment plants

19 Organisation and operation Municipalities deal with their responsibility in different ways and design their own waste management organisation Organisation:  About 50 % municipal companies Collection:  73 % outsourcing (mainly to private companies) Treatment:  About 65% outsourcing (mainly to municipal companies)

20 Owner-ship of waste incinerators  Municipally owned plant –Co-owned regional waste company (2 out of 32) –Full-owned energy company –Full-owned multi-utility company  Privatly owned plant (4,5 out of 32)

21 Clear division of roles and responsibilities Private and public waste management sector Knowledge- and Equipment supply Treatment- and Collection services Responsibility Implementation and operation Producers Citizens/hous eholds Municipalities Companies /Industries

22 Co-operation Co-operation – the solution to an increasingly complex waste management Thru Common municipal waste company (20 regional companies in Sweden) Common municipal waste association (8 associations in Sweden with totally 28 municipalities) Common board (4 common boards in Sweden with totally 9 municipalities) Common procurement on specific issues matters

23 Part 3 Overview Model Infrastructure Collection Recovery and Recycling

24 Overview model Housholds or companies Waste prevention Collection and transport Recycling stations Recycling centers Curbside collection Materialrecycling Biological recycling Energy recovery Landfill New products: Biogas, new materials, district heating, electricity, bio-fertilizer

25 Public awarness - a success factor Key messages and tools for motivation and to facilitate collaboration: –Communication –Development of self instructive systems –Feed back of the results and that ”what I do matters” –Emphasize on the waste holders responsibility and participation

26 Waste prevention  Long tradition of reuse through flea markets, second hand, collection at recycling parks, etc  Deposit fee system for bevarage containers/bottles  Foodwaste, textiles, electronical and demolition waste in focus – goals proposed  Largest challenge: decoupling between generated waste and economic growth

27 Resource recovery focus Quality Source separation

28 Resource recovery focus Quality Source separation Secure handling of hazardous waste

29 Infrastructure Collection of waste from households based on source separation  Curb side collection  unmanned recycling drop-off stations  630 manned drop-off recycling centers Treatment and recycling of waste based on the charcter of the waste  60 organic waste facilities  34 waste to energy plants  78 landfills

30 Collection Collection of waste from households based on source separation  Curbside collection for combustible and food waste (and sometimes packaging and paper)  unmanned recycling drop-off stations for for packaging and paper  630 manned drop-off recycling centers for bulky, electronical and hazardous waste  Various solutions for hazardous waste collection

31 Innovation and trends in collection  Multi compartment collection vessels  Optical sorting  Vehicles on biogas  Automated vacuum systems  Underground containers

32 Infrastructure Treatment and recycling of waste based on the character of the waste  60 organic waste facilities  34 waste to energy plants  78 landfills

33 Recycling centers

34 A system based on resource focus Combustible wasteFood waste Products District energy BiofertilizerBiogas Electricity Hazardous waste Direct environmental benifit Petrol saved and industrial fertilizer saved Fossil and other fuels saved Virgin materials and energy saved Environmental protection costs saved Materials

35 A system based on resource focus Combustible wasteFood waste Products District energy BiofertilizerBiogas Electricity Hazardous waste Direct environmental benifit Petrol saved and industrial fertilizer saved Fossil and other fuels saved Virgin materials and energy saved Environmental protection costs saved Materials TWh district energy - > 20 % of the total district energy in Sweden / the heating need of homes 1,7 TWh electricity -> need of homes TWh district energy - > 20 % of the total district energy in Sweden / the heating need of homes 1,7 TWh electricity -> need of homes 2012: 353 GWh vehicle-fuel produced from foodwaste replaced about 30 millions liters of petrol tonnes biofertilizer produced replacing industrial fertilizer

36 Production of biogas and bio-fertilizer  The most increasing treatment method  58 plants  Energy recovery by the production of biogas used as a vehicle-fuel  Recycling of nutritions to farming-land by the production of bio-fertilizer During 2012, 353 GWh vehicle-fuel was produced from foodwaste replacing about 30 millions liters of petrol tonnes biofertilizer is produced yearly in Sweden.

37 Generation of district heating and electricity  Covers around 20 % of the total district heating in Sweden, equals the needs of homes  Produces electricity corresponding to the needs of homes  Advanced and secure flue gas treatment  Most of the rest-products can be recycled Total energy production 2012: District heating: 13 TWh Electricity: 1,7 TWh (including industral waste)

38 Energy recovery of waste 34 plants:  Receiving – tonnes yearly (2012: 32 plants)  Recovering yearly (2012: 32 plants) –totally tonnes –of which tonnes municipal waste  Gate fee approx SEK/tonnes (average 500 SEK)

39 The most energy efficient plants in the world 0,0 0,5 1,0 1,5 2,0 2,5 3,0 Sweden Czech Republic Denmark Norway Finland Switzerland The Netherlands Germany Hungery France Italy Spain Belgium Portugal Austria Great Britain MWh /ton Electricity Heat Recovered energy per tonne household waste incinerated If industrial waste was included in the diagram the Swedish result would be almost 3 MWh/tonnes

40 Efficient and clean waste incineration

41 Clean waste incineration  Most emissions decreased with % since 1985: –Strict emission regulations –Fee on NOx (nitrooxygen)

42 Reduced weight and volume weight% bottom ash 3-5 weight% fly ash

43 From landfills to modern recycling facilities (Illustrator: Per Josefsson)

44 An integrated part of a holistic system Products Material recycling Waste Incineration Landfill Vehicle fuel Biogas Cooling/ heating production Biosolids Farms Sewage water cleaning Anaerobic digestion Electricity production Other fuels Households

45 Part 4 Waste Economy Means of Control Success Factors Challenges Vision and Long Term Goals

46 Waste economy Municipal waste:  All costs covered by municipal waste fees (not by taxes)  The fee is decided by each municipal board  Non-profit  Allowed to be differentiated to encourage source separation for recycling Municipal waste within producers’ responsibility:  Costs covered by a fee added to the price of every product  The fee is decided by the producers

47 Waste fee Average yearly fee per household 2011: Houses: 220 EUR Flats: 140 EUR Average daily fee per household

48 Costs for municipal waste management Cost for municipal waste management, 2010, average

49 Means of control  Environmental objectives  Government regulations, bans, and taxes, for example:  Tax on landfilling (since 2000)  Ban on landfilling of combustible waste since 2002  Ban on landfilling of organic waste since 2005  Differentiated municipal waste tariffs  Municipal waste planning and regulations  Information and communication

50 Important success factors  Waste management is a public service  Clear division of roles and responsibilities  Clear national environmental targets showing the direction and long-term regulations and economical steering instruments  Co-operation between municipalities  Collaboration between public and private sectors  Holistic system view- an integrated part of the sustinable city  Co-operation within municipalites (Waste-, Energy-, Water-, Urban- planning-, etc departements)  A system based on source separation with focus on communication and public engagement  A system based on resource recovery

51 Generated household waste in Sweden is predicted to double (Swedish EPA) Generated waste world wide is predicted to rise with 72 % (What a Waste-A global review of Solid Waste Management, mars 2012, World Bank Group) Generated household waste in Sweden is predicted to double (Swedish EPA) Generated waste world wide is predicted to rise with 72 % (What a Waste-A global review of Solid Waste Management, mars 2012, World Bank Group)

52 Avfall Sverige’s vision BN P Economic growth Generated waste Zero waste! Long-term goals until 2020:  Decoupling between generated waste and economic growth  Strong upward movement in waste hierarchy

53 Part 5 Waste Management on Export – A new Swedish Platform

54 Swedish Waste Management on Export A new Swedish platform built on co-operation between the public and private waste management sector SosExpo Warszawa Mars 2013

55 Aim with the new platform To facilitate the export of  Swedish knowledge about waste management,  products and services within the waste sector, through cooperation among the public and the private waste management sector.

56 A strategy based on cooperation A network of actors in the public and private waste management sector in Sweden: -Municipalities/municipal companies -Knowledge suppliers -Technlogy suppliers A network of actors in the public and private waste management sector in Sweden: -Municipalities/municipal companies -Knowledge suppliers -Technlogy suppliers A strong Swedish platform with a unique mix of competences

57 Swedish Waste Management on Export Project leader: Jenny Åström Information about swedish waste management in english : englishwww.avfallsverige.se/in- english Information about the national platform for export of knowledge and technology: Contact and information


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