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Unit 8 Fourteen Steps. Contents Contents Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions Background information.

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Presentation on theme: "Unit 8 Fourteen Steps. Contents Contents Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions Background information."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit 8 Fourteen Steps

2 Contents Contents Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions Background information Background information Background information Background information Structure analysis Structure analysis Structure analysis Structure analysis Comprehension questions Comprehension questions Comprehension questions Comprehension questions Language points of Text I Language points of Text I Language points of Text I Language points of Text I Grammatical items Grammatical items Grammatical items Grammatical items Exercises Exercises Exercises Comprehension questions of Text II Comprehension questions of Text II Comprehension questions of Text II Comprehension questions of Text II Oral activities Oral activities Oral activities Oral activities Writing practice Writing practice Writing practice Writing practice

3 Text I Fourteen steps Pre-reading questions Pre-reading questions 1. Can you invalid lead a happy life ? Please explain. 2. How would you show your appreciation if somebody helps you when you are in trouble?

4 Background information (1) Background information (1) Christopher Reeve 10/11/obit.reeve/ 10/11/obit.reeve/ es/10/11/obit.reeve es/10/11/obit.reeve es/10/11/obit.reeve es/10/11/obit.reeve

5 Background information (2)

6 Background information (3) Christopher Reeve’s Decision (After his devastating accident, he had to find a reason to keep living.) Christopher Reeve On a may weekend in 1995, my world changed forever. I was competing in an equestrian event in Virginia when my horse, Buck, decided to put on the brakes just before the third jump. On a may weekend in 1995, my world changed forever. I was competing in an equestrian event in Virginia when my horse, Buck, decided to put on the brakes just before the third jump.

7 Background information (4) When he stopped suddenly, momentum carried me over the top of his head. My hands got entangled in the bridle, and I couldn’t get an arm free to break my fall. All six-feet-four- inches and 215 pounds of me landed headfirst. Within seconds I was paralyzed from the neck down and fighting for air like a drowning person. When he stopped suddenly, momentum carried me over the top of his head. My hands got entangled in the bridle, and I couldn’t get an arm free to break my fall. All six-feet-four- inches and 215 pounds of me landed headfirst. Within seconds I was paralyzed from the neck down and fighting for air like a drowning person. (To be continued) (To be continued)

8 Background information (5) I woke up five days later in the intensive-care unit at the University of Virginia hospital. Dr. John Jane, head of neurosurgery at the hospital, said I had broken the top two cervical vertebrae and that I was extremely lucky to have survived. He told my wife, Dana, and me that I might never be able to breathe on my own again. But my head was intact, and my brain stem—so close to the site of the injury— appeared unharmed. I woke up five days later in the intensive-care unit at the University of Virginia hospital. Dr. John Jane, head of neurosurgery at the hospital, said I had broken the top two cervical vertebrae and that I was extremely lucky to have survived. He told my wife, Dana, and me that I might never be able to breathe on my own again. But my head was intact, and my brain stem—so close to the site of the injury— appeared unharmed.

9 Background information (6) Dr. Jane said my skull would have to be reconnected to my spinal column. He wasn’t sure if the operation would be successful, or even if I could survive. Dr. Jane said my skull would have to be reconnected to my spinal column. He wasn’t sure if the operation would be successful, or even if I could survive. Suddenly it dawned on me that I was going to be a huge burden to everybody, that I had ruined my life and everybody else’s. Why not die, I thought miserably, and save everyone a lot of trouble? Suddenly it dawned on me that I was going to be a huge burden to everybody, that I had ruined my life and everybody else’s. Why not die, I thought miserably, and save everyone a lot of trouble?

10 Background information (7) As family and friends visited, my spirits were on a roller-coaster ride. I would feel so grateful when someone came a long way to cheer me up. But the time would come when everybody had to leave, and I’d lie there and stare at the wall, stare at the future, stare in disbelief. As family and friends visited, my spirits were on a roller-coaster ride. I would feel so grateful when someone came a long way to cheer me up. But the time would come when everybody had to leave, and I’d lie there and stare at the wall, stare at the future, stare in disbelief. When I would finally fall asleep, I’d be whole again, making love to Dana, riding or acting in a play. Then I’d wake up and realize that I could no longer do any of that; I was just taking up space. When I would finally fall asleep, I’d be whole again, making love to Dana, riding or acting in a play. Then I’d wake up and realize that I could no longer do any of that; I was just taking up space.

11 Background information (8) One day Dana came into the room and stood beside me. I could not talk because of the ventilator. But as we made eye contact, I mouthed the words, “Maybe we should let me go.” One day Dana came into the room and stood beside me. I could not talk because of the ventilator. But as we made eye contact, I mouthed the words, “Maybe we should let me go.” Dana started crying. “I am only going to say this once,” she said. “I will support whatever you want to do because this is your life and your decision. But I want you to know that I’ll be with you for the long haul, no matter what.” Dana started crying. “I am only going to say this once,” she said. “I will support whatever you want to do because this is your life and your decision. But I want you to know that I’ll be with you for the long haul, no matter what.”

12 Background information (9) Then she added the words that saved my life: “You’re still you. And I love you.” Then she added the words that saved my life: “You’re still you. And I love you.” I can’t drift away from this, I began to realize. I don’t want to leave. I can’t drift away from this, I began to realize. I don’t want to leave. Dana and Me Dana and Me A crisis like my accident doesn’t change a marriage; it brings out what is truly there. It intensifies but does not transform it. Dana rescued me when I was lying in Virginia with a broken body, but that was really the second time. The first time was the night we met. A crisis like my accident doesn’t change a marriage; it brings out what is truly there. It intensifies but does not transform it. Dana rescued me when I was lying in Virginia with a broken body, but that was really the second time. The first time was the night we met.

13 Background information (10) It was June 1987, and a long-term relationship of mine had ended. I was determined to be alone and focus on my work. Since childhood I had developed the belief that a few isolated moments of happiness were the best you could hope for in relationships. I didn’t want to risk too much because I was certain that disappointment would follow. It was June 1987, and a long-term relationship of mine had ended. I was determined to be alone and focus on my work. Since childhood I had developed the belief that a few isolated moments of happiness were the best you could hope for in relationships. I didn’t want to risk too much because I was certain that disappointment would follow.

14 Background information (11) Then one night I went to a cabaret with friends, and Dana Morosini stepped onstage. She wore an off-the-shoulder dress and sang “The Music That Makes Me Dance”. I went down hook, line and sinker. Then one night I went to a cabaret with friends, and Dana Morosini stepped onstage. She wore an off-the-shoulder dress and sang “The Music That Makes Me Dance”. I went down hook, line and sinker.

15 Background information (12) Afterward I went backstage and introduced myself. At the time, I was an established film actor. You wouldn’t think I’d have a problem with a simple conversation with a woman. But when I offered her a ride to the party we were all going to, she said, “No, thanks, I have my own car.” All I could say was “Oh”. I dragged myself out to my old pickup truck, trying to plan my next move. Afterward I went backstage and introduced myself. At the time, I was an established film actor. You wouldn’t think I’d have a problem with a simple conversation with a woman. But when I offered her a ride to the party we were all going to, she said, “No, thanks, I have my own car.” All I could say was “Oh”. I dragged myself out to my old pickup truck, trying to plan my next move.

16 Background information (13) Later I tried again. We talked for a solid hour. I have no idea what we talked about. Everything seemed to evaporate around us. I thought to myself, I don’t want to make a mistake and ruin this. Later I tried again. We talked for a solid hour. I have no idea what we talked about. Everything seemed to evaporate around us. I thought to myself, I don’t want to make a mistake and ruin this. We started dating in a very old-fashioned way. I got to know Dana’s parents, and we developed an easy rapport. And Dana was instantly comfortable with my two children, Matthew and Alexandra. It filled me with joy. We started dating in a very old-fashioned way. I got to know Dana’s parents, and we developed an easy rapport. And Dana was instantly comfortable with my two children, Matthew and Alexandra. It filled me with joy.

17 Background information (14) Dana and I were married in April Three years later came my accident and Dana’s words in the hospital room: “You’re still you.” Dana and I were married in April Three years later came my accident and Dana’s words in the hospital room: “You’re still you.” I mouthed, “This goes way beyond the marriage vows—‘in sickness and in health’.” She said, “I know.” I knew then and there that she was going to be with me forever. We had become a family. I mouthed, “This goes way beyond the marriage vows—‘in sickness and in health’.” She said, “I know.” I knew then and there that she was going to be with me forever. We had become a family.

18 Structure analysis of the text (1) According to the development of the story, the text is composed of four parts, each of which focuses on one topic. Respectively, these topics are about the author’s first life, his second life, his third life and his reflection on the auto-repair incident. According to the development of the story, the text is composed of four parts, each of which focuses on one topic. Respectively, these topics are about the author’s first life, his second life, his third life and his reflection on the auto-repair incident.

19 Structure analysis of the text (2) Paragraphs 1-2 These two paragraphs make up the first part of the text, in which the author’s life could be further divided into two phases: the first phase was a hard struggle to make a living because of the early death of his father and the support for his paralyzed mother, and the second phase was “a pleasant dream”, because the author had everything that a happy life can offer.

20 Structure analysis of the text (3) Paragraphs 3-5 Paragraphs 3-5 In these paragraphs, the author depicts is life afflicted by the disease, especially the difficulty in climbing the 14 steps. However, what the author attempts to convey is not so much a picture of his struggle against the disease as his painful climbing of the 14 steps. Instead of boasting his strength and courage as one might expect, the author confides to us his frustration and In these paragraphs, the author depicts is life afflicted by the disease, especially the difficulty in climbing the 14 steps. However, what the author attempts to convey is not so much a picture of his struggle against the disease as his painful climbing of the 14 steps. Instead of boasting his strength and courage as one might expect, the author confides to us his frustration and

21 Structure analysis of the text (4) disillusionment through his reactions to the rhetorical question “Crazy?” (Paragraph 4) and the assumption of others: “You might think that here walked a man of courage and strength” (Paragraph 5). Thus we see hid dread that he would be through—if he could not one day repeat the process of climbing the steps. disillusionment through his reactions to the rhetorical question “Crazy?” (Paragraph 4) and the assumption of others: “You might think that here walked a man of courage and strength” (Paragraph 5). Thus we see hid dread that he would be through—if he could not one day repeat the process of climbing the steps.

22 Structure analysis of the text (5) Paragraphs 6-8 Paragraphs 6-8 Paragraph 6 describes how the author got a flat tire in a stormy night and his desperate need for help. Paragraph 7 depicts how the man and the little girl managed to replace the flat tire and how the author felt about it. Paragraph 8 mainly consists of conversations between the author and the old man and the little girl, in which the old man declined the author’s payment. Paragraph 6 describes how the author got a flat tire in a stormy night and his desperate need for help. Paragraph 7 depicts how the man and the little girl managed to replace the flat tire and how the author felt about it. Paragraph 8 mainly consists of conversations between the author and the old man and the little girl, in which the old man declined the author’s payment.

23 Structure analysis of the text (6) Paragraphs 9-10 Paragraphs 9-10 These two concluding paragraphs are the author’s reflection on the incident and his life philosophy, from which he discovered the true value of life. These two concluding paragraphs are the author’s reflection on the incident and his life philosophy, from which he discovered the true value of life.

24 Comprehension questions (1) 1. When was the period of time the author considered happiest in his life? 1. When was the period of time the author considered happiest in his life? For the author the happiest period was in the second half of his first life when he got married, had a good job, enjoyed excellent health and had two lovely daughters. For the author the happiest period was in the second half of his first life when he got married, had a good job, enjoyed excellent health and had two lovely daughters.

25 Comprehension questions (2) 2. What was the author most afraid of after he was afflicted with a disease? 2. What was the author most afraid of after he was afflicted with a disease? The author was most afraid of the day when he was unable to climb whose steps, and that would be the day of his defeat and the end of his life. The author was most afraid of the day when he was unable to climb whose steps, and that would be the day of his defeat and the end of his life.

26 Comprehension questions (3) 3. How did the author view the 14 steps? 3. How did the author view the 14 steps? The author viewed the 14 steps as his “challenge to continue living ” and something miserable that he had to accept and cope with in order to hold on to his sanity and his wife and his home and his job. The author viewed the 14 steps as his “challenge to continue living ” and something miserable that he had to accept and cope with in order to hold on to his sanity and his wife and his home and his job.

27 Comprehension questions (4) 4. How did the author fell when the man and the little girl were working in the change the flat tire? 4. How did the author fell when the man and the little girl were working in the change the flat tire? When the man and the little girl were trying to change the flat tire in the storm, the author did not feel uncomfortable, though he first felt a bit sorry for them. However, this uneasiness was soon relieved by the thought that he would pay for their work. When the man and the little girl were trying to change the flat tire in the storm, the author did not feel uncomfortable, though he first felt a bit sorry for them. However, this uneasiness was soon relieved by the thought that he would pay for their work.

28 Comprehension questions (5) 5. Why was the author overwhelmed with shame and horror when the repair work was done? 5. Why was the author overwhelmed with shame and horror when the repair work was done? The author was hocked when he learned that the girl’s grandpa was a blind man, as disabled as himself. This knowledge gave him shame and horror because as a disabled man, he had taken for granted that he deserved other people’s help but he had never thought of helping others. The author was hocked when he learned that the girl’s grandpa was a blind man, as disabled as himself. This knowledge gave him shame and horror because as a disabled man, he had taken for granted that he deserved other people’s help but he had never thought of helping others.

29 Comprehension questions (6) 6. What did the author learn from the auto- repair incident? 6. What did the author learn from the auto- repair incident? The author learned from the incident that he should always be ready to help others as the blind man was, while struggling against his adversity. The author learned from the incident that he should always be ready to help others as the blind man was, while struggling against his adversity.

30 Language points of Text I (1) 1. be inclined to: to be likely or tend to 1. be inclined to: to be likely or tend to eg. Middle-class victims are more inclined to contact the police. eg. Middle-class victims are more inclined to contact the police. I don’t feel inclined to talk to him. I don’t feel inclined to talk to him. 2. care for: to look after 2. care for: to look after eg. He is very good at caring for sick old people. eg. He is very good at caring for sick old people. Caring for a nervous injured bird requires a lot of patience. Caring for a nervous injured bird requires a lot of patience.

31 Language points of Text I (2) 3. follow one’s example: to imitate 3. follow one’s example: to imitate eg. Brian persuaded his brother to follow his example and join the army. eg. Brian persuaded his brother to follow his example and join the army. I suggest you follow Jed’s example and take some regular exercises. I suggest you follow Jed’s example and take some regular exercises. 4. afflict: to cause severe suffering or pain 4. afflict: to cause severe suffering or pain eg. The old man was afflicted with blindness. eg. The old man was afflicted with blindness. Pollution might be one of the major problems currently afflicting Third World countries. Pollution might be one of the major problems currently afflicting Third World countries.

32 Language points of Text I (3) 5. with the aid of: with the help of 5. with the aid of: with the help of eg. The bacteria can only be seen with the aid of a high-power microscope. eg. The bacteria can only be seen with the aid of a high-power microscope. 6. install: v. to set up 6. install: v. to set up eg. The cost of installing a computer system can be justified in terms of greater efficiency. eg. The cost of installing a computer system can be justified in terms of greater efficiency. All gas stations have now installed pumps for leaded petrol. All gas stations have now installed pumps for leaded petrol.

33 Language points of Text I (4) 7. to a degree: partly 7. to a degree: partly eg. To a degree this course of action was forced upon her. eg. To a degree this course of action was forced upon her. 8. utterly: completely 8. utterly: completely eg. Without UN help it would have been utterly impossible to arrange the conference. eg. Without UN help it would have been utterly impossible to arrange the conference. We utterly reject the philosophy of compulsory wage control. We utterly reject the philosophy of compulsory wage control.

34 Language points of Text I (5) 9. disillusioned: disappointed 9. disillusioned: disappointed eg. Disillusioned by his team’s performance, the manager resigned. eg. Disillusioned by his team’s performance, the manager resigned. Impossibly high expectations of the new regime have left many voters disillusioned. Impossibly high expectations of the new regime have left many voters disillusioned. 10. hold on to: to keep one’s grip on; not to let go of 10. hold on to: to keep one’s grip on; not to let go of eg. Hold on to your ticket—you might need it on the return journey. eg. Hold on to your ticket—you might need it on the return journey.

35 Language points of Text I (6) 11. lead up to: to come before and result in 11. lead up to: to come before and result in eg. The book describes the trial and the events leading up to it in great detail. eg. The book describes the trial and the events leading up to it in great detail. 12. steer: to control 12. steer: to control eg. She has steered the company away from financial ruin. eg. She has steered the company away from financial ruin. 13. jerk: to pull suddenly and quickly 13. jerk: to pull suddenly and quickly eg. He jerked the string and the light came on. eg. He jerked the string and the light came on.

36 Language points of Text I (7) 14. swerve: to turn suddenly to one side 14. swerve: to turn suddenly to one side eg. The driver swerved sharply to avoid hitting a dog. eg. The driver swerved sharply to avoid hitting a dog. Next, the pitcher threw a curved ball, which swerved away from me as I lunged forward to hit it. Next, the pitcher threw a curved ball, which swerved away from me as I lunged forward to hit it. 15. sweep: to move quickly and smoothly (all over) 15. sweep: to move quickly and smoothly (all over) eg. A wave of panic swept over her. eg. A wave of panic swept over her. A new dance craze swept the country. A new dance craze swept the country.

37 Language points of Text I (8) 16. bundle: to quickly push something for someone into something 16. bundle: to quickly push something for someone into something eg. He had been bundled into the back of a Volkswagen by three masked men. eg. He had been bundled into the back of a Volkswagen by three masked men. There had just been time to bundle his bloodstained jacket and gloves into the washing machine. There had just been time to bundle his bloodstained jacket and gloves into the washing machine.

38 Language points of Text I (9) 17. slacken: to become slower or less active 17. slacken: to become slower or less active eg. The train slackened speed as we approached the station. eg. The train slackened speed as we approached the station. We slackened our pace as we reached the village. We slackened our pace as we reached the village. 18. jack up: to lift with a jack 18. jack up: to lift with a jack eg. Why don’t you jack it up and we’ll have a look at the suspension? eg. Why don’t you jack it up and we’ll have a look at the suspension?

39 Language points of Text I (10) 19. frail: weak and poor in health 19. frail: weak and poor in health eg. A frail old woman with a walking stick came slowly down to the gate to meet us. eg. A frail old woman with a walking stick came slowly down to the gate to meet us. His frail arm could barely hold his plate. His frail arm could barely hold his plate. 20. penetrate: to enter or pass (into or through) 20. penetrate: to enter or pass (into or through) eg. Light cannot penetrate a brick wall. eg. Light cannot penetrate a brick wall. Our eyes could not penetrate the darkness. Our eyes could not penetrate the darkness.

40 Language points of Text I (11). 21. overflow with: to be very full of. 21. overflow with: to be very full of eg. Kerry handed me a glass overflowing with wine, trying not to let it spill on the carpet. eg. Kerry handed me a glass overflowing with wine, trying not to let it spill on the carpet. Mother Teresa was respected by the people because she had a heart overflowing with love. Mother Teresa was respected by the people because she had a heart overflowing with love.

41 Language points of Text I (12) 22. indifference: not caring about 22. indifference: not caring about eg. Though thoroughly apprehensive, he put on a show of indifference. eg. Though thoroughly apprehensive, he put on a show of indifference. All our requests for government help have been met with complete indifference. All our requests for government help have been met with complete indifference.

42 Exercises (1) Translation exercises 1. 他和他弟弟在一起玩的时候很容易发脾气 ( be inclined to ) He is inclined to lose his temper when he is playing with his younger brother. 2. 那次事故之后,他只能借助于拐杖走路。 ( with the aid of ) Since the accident he’s only been able to walk with the aid of a stick.

43 Exercises (2) 3. 我想那还是有几分正确性的,但情况并 不那么简单。( to a degree ) 3. 我想那还是有几分正确性的,但情况并 不那么简单。( to a degree ) I think that’s true to a degree, but the situation is not quite so simple. I think that’s true to a degree, but the situation is not quite so simple. 4. 父亲说如果我们相信某事是真的,就应 该坚持。( hold on to ) 4. 父亲说如果我们相信某事是真的,就应 该坚持。( hold on to ) My father said that if we believed that something was true, we should hold on to it. My father said that if we believed that something was true, we should hold on to it.

44 Exercises (3) 5. 他对政府处理经济问题的方法很失望。 (disillusioned) He’s very disillusioned at the government’s handling of the economy. 6. 听到这消息时,我们已准备去度假。( be all set ) We were all set to go on vacation when we heard the news.

45 Exercises (4) 7. 太阳的光线穿透海水达 20 米深处。 ( penetrate) 7. 太阳的光线穿透海水达 20 米深处。 ( penetrate) The sun’s rays can penetrate the sea to a depth of 20 metres. The sun’s rays can penetrate the sea to a depth of 20 metres. 8. 他的甜言蜜语是开口要钱的第一步。 (lead up to ) 8. 他的甜言蜜语是开口要钱的第一步。 (lead up to ) His flattering words led up to a request for money. His flattering words led up to a request for money.

46 Exercises (6) Fill in the blank in each sentence with a word or phrase taken from the box in its appropriate form. Fill in the blank in each sentence with a word or phrase taken from the box in its appropriate form. making a living hold on to be inclined to to a degree care for lead up to follow one’s example tilt jack up fumble

47 Exercises (7) 1. The table top suddenly ____________ and all the plates and glasses crashed onto the floor. 1. The table top suddenly ____________ and all the plates and glasses crashed onto the floor. 2. In order to understand the committee’s decision it is necessary to examine the process that ______________it. 2. In order to understand the committee’s decision it is necessary to examine the process that ______________it. 3. We were thinking of selling this old furniture, but we’ve decided to ________________it. It might be valuable. 3. We were thinking of selling this old furniture, but we’ve decided to ________________it. It might be valuable. tilted led up to hold on to

48 Exercises (8) 4. Sister Mary remained constantly at the doctor’s side, helping him ______________the sick and wounded. 4. Sister Mary remained constantly at the doctor’s side, helping him ______________the sick and wounded. 5. If she sees clothes that she likes, she _______________ buy them immediately. 5. If she sees clothes that she likes, she _______________ buy them immediately. care for is inclined to

49 Comprehension questions of Text II 1. What do you think made the author stand up again? 1. What do you think made the author stand up again? 2. Do you believe in power of belief? Please illustrate your point with examples. 2. Do you believe in power of belief? Please illustrate your point with examples.

50 Oral activities 1. Retell the virtues of growing older in class. 1. Retell the virtues of growing older in class. 2. Oral activities: 2. Oral activities: 1) Why was the author so much affected by the accident? How did it change his attitude towards life? 1) Why was the author so much affected by the accident? How did it change his attitude towards life? 2) Group work: discuss the issue to help the handicapped who have negative attitudes towards life. 2) Group work: discuss the issue to help the handicapped who have negative attitudes towards life.

51 Writing practice The Personal Qualities of a Teacher The Personal Qualities of a Teacher

52 Writing practice One possible version One possible version Here I want to try to give you an answer to the question: What personal qualities are desirable in a teacher? Probably no two people would draw up exactly similar lists, but I think the following would be generally accepted. Here I want to try to give you an answer to the question: What personal qualities are desirable in a teacher? Probably no two people would draw up exactly similar lists, but I think the following would be generally accepted. First, the teacher’s personality should be pleasantly live and attractive. Secondly, it is not merely desirable but essential for a teacher to have a genuine capacity for sympathy—in the literal meaning of that word; a capacity to tune in to the minds and feelings of other people, especially, since most teachers are school teachers, to the minds and feelings of children. Closely related with this is the First, the teacher’s personality should be pleasantly live and attractive. Secondly, it is not merely desirable but essential for a teacher to have a genuine capacity for sympathy—in the literal meaning of that word; a capacity to tune in to the minds and feelings of other people, especially, since most teachers are school teachers, to the minds and feelings of children. Closely related with this is the

53 Writing practice capacity to be tolerant—not, indeed, of what is wrong, but of the frailty and immaturity of human nature which induce people, and again especially children, to make mistakes. Thirdly, I hold it essential for teachers to be both intellectually and morally honest. It means that they will be aware of their intellectual strengths, and limitations, and will have thought about and decided upon the moral principles by which his life shall be guided. capacity to be tolerant—not, indeed, of what is wrong, but of the frailty and immaturity of human nature which induce people, and again especially children, to make mistakes. Thirdly, I hold it essential for teachers to be both intellectually and morally honest. It means that they will be aware of their intellectual strengths, and limitations, and will have thought about and decided upon the moral principles by which his life shall be guided.

54 Writing practice There is no contradiction in my going on to say that a teacher should be a bit of an actor. That is part of the technique of teaching, which demands that every now and then a teacher should be able to put on an act—to enliven a lesson, correct a fault, or award praise. Children, especially young children, live in a world that is rather larger than life. There is no contradiction in my going on to say that a teacher should be a bit of an actor. That is part of the technique of teaching, which demands that every now and then a teacher should be able to put on an act—to enliven a lesson, correct a fault, or award praise. Children, especially young children, live in a world that is rather larger than life.

55 Writing practice Finally, I think a teacher should have the kind of mind which always wants to go on learning. Teaching is a job at which one will never be perfect; there is always something more to learn about. There are three principal objects of study: the subject, or subjects, which the teacher is teaching; the methods by which they can best be taught to the particular pupils in the classes he is teaching; and—by far the most important—the children, young people, or adults to whom they are to be taught. Finally, I think a teacher should have the kind of mind which always wants to go on learning. Teaching is a job at which one will never be perfect; there is always something more to learn about. There are three principal objects of study: the subject, or subjects, which the teacher is teaching; the methods by which they can best be taught to the particular pupils in the classes he is teaching; and—by far the most important—the children, young people, or adults to whom they are to be taught.

56 Writing practice The two cardinal principles of British education today are that education is education of the whole person, and that it is best acquired through full and active co-operation between two persons, the teacher and the learner. The two cardinal principles of British education today are that education is education of the whole person, and that it is best acquired through full and active co-operation between two persons, the teacher and the learner.

57 GOOD BYE


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