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Remediation Challenges and Stakeholder Engagement: A Canadian Perspective Michael Binder President Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Presentation to the.

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Presentation on theme: "Remediation Challenges and Stakeholder Engagement: A Canadian Perspective Michael Binder President Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Presentation to the."— Presentation transcript:

1 Remediation Challenges and Stakeholder Engagement: A Canadian Perspective Michael Binder President Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Presentation to the IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Vienna, Austria 20 September 2012 nuclearsafety.gc.ca

2 Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment; and to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Celebrating over 65 years of nuclear safety!

3 CNSC Regulates All Nuclear-Related Facilities and Activities Uranium fabricators and processing Nuclear power plants Radioactive waste management facilities Nuclear substance processing Industrial and medical applications Nuclear research and educational Export/import control Mines and mills Uranium fuel IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting From cradle to grave

4 Independent Commission Quasi-judicial administrative tribunal Reports to Parliament through Minister of Natural Resources Canada Commission hearings are public and Webcast Decision can only be reviewed by Federal Court IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Transparent, science-based decision-making

5 The Remediation Challenge Clean-up of widely contaminated areas Existing guidance: Good enough? Canadian experience The way ahead IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Another important lesson from the Japan experience Radiation monitoring at a baseball diamond in Japan Post-Fukshima

6 Action in Major Nuclear Accident Urgent and early protective actions –Evacuation, sheltering and instructions to take KI pills are based mainly on averted dose Longer term actions –Balance radiological risk and social and economic disruption –Normally involve political decisions IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Short term and long term considerations Police officers at a checkpoint in Minamisoma, Japan.

7 International Benchmarks International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) World Health Organization (WHO) IAEA - Basic Safety Standards (BSS) IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Expert authorities need consistent advice to stakeholders

8 Canadian Experience No serious accidents to date - hopefully, none will ever happen Experience: clean-up of legacy sites –Port Hope - political decision Uranium in soil – 23 (vs. 45) ppm –Mine closures Remediation work - Gunnar and Lorado –Transportation – MCP Altona –Business non-compliance, bankruptcy - Enviropac IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting We need to be ready for any accident

9 Canada - Multilayered Federal Democracy Multiple levels of government / layers – Federal, provincial, municipal and operators Multiple players within / across each level –Example: CNSC, Health Canada, Public Safety Canada, emergency management organizations in each province, etc. IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Another important lesson: coordination and communication are the key

10 Canadian Regulatory Framework Risk assessment approach for decommissioning and clean-up Need clarity on plan for post-accident recovery –Permanent relocation or resettlement –Clean-up of buildings, soil and vegetation –Managing waste and health surveillance –Information and education of affected communities Collaborative work underway for improved clarity and accountability Human factors always a concern IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Part of our post-Fukushima Action Plan

11 Constant Engagement with the Public and Stakeholders Set clear requirements and challenge myths Science-based, plain-language communications Public hearings with participant funding Webcasting and social media IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting On-going Dialogue

12 Canada – Communications Lessons Learned Crisis Web site – information ready for an emergency if one happens Spokesperson – Identified early, visible –24/7 media challenge Regulator messaging - clarity, timeliness, consistency Utilizing international support - i.e., IAEA Emergency management –Whole of government approach IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Putting learning into action

13 The Way Ahead Clarify post-accident recovery requirements –What is an acceptable level of risk? –How to best explain: 1 mSv (regulatory dose limit) vs. upper bound of 20 mSv (reference level for living on contaminated lands after emergency)? –Consult stakeholders Consistent messaging from international bodies Public communication is critical – let’s prepare IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Regulatory clarity and stakeholder understanding are our priorities

14 Upcoming Opportunities International Experts Meeting on Decommissioning and Remediation after a Nuclear Accident Vienna, Austria, Jan 28-Feb 1, 2013 Canada hosting the IAEA 3 rd International Conference on Effective Nuclear Regulatory Systems Ottawa, Canada, April 8-12, 2013 IAEA General Conference: Senior Regulator’s Meeting Let’s take advantage of these opportunities IAEA


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