Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

 Penetrate New Markets: Evaluate opportunities in different geographies, in other parts of the value chain, and through new lines of business  Grow.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: " Penetrate New Markets: Evaluate opportunities in different geographies, in other parts of the value chain, and through new lines of business  Grow."— Presentation transcript:

1

2

3  Penetrate New Markets: Evaluate opportunities in different geographies, in other parts of the value chain, and through new lines of business  Grow Revenue: Ensure optimal pricing, optimize product/service portfolios, and expand distribution channels  Track Competitors and Drive Differentiation: Track competitors' product developments, customer markets, and geographic expansion; identify unique and sustainable product and brand positioning  Acquire and Retain Customers: Develop a deeper understanding of customers' diverse requirements and unmet needs  Predict and Respond to Market Dynamics: Monitor, forecast, and proactively respond to trends in regulations, technology, and emerging business models

4 Genomics Proteomics Metabolomics Pharmaceuticals Diagnostics Regulators Governments Payors Physicians Pharmacies Hospitals

5

6 ProducersProducers Distribution Intermediate ProvidersProviders Finance Intermediate PayersPayers Cost Innovation Classic Approach ProducersProducers Distribution Intermediate ProvidersProviders Finance Intermediate PayersPayers New Approach Consumer Driven Healthcare Personalized Healthcare Retail Healthcare Public Healthcare

7

8

9

10 Hospitalization: In most countries, this just means care that takes place in a hospital. The US is in outlier, in this case, though. Here, doctors might be employed by a hospital, or they might contract with one. In the latter case, a doctor would use hospital facilities but be paid by patients (or insurers). OECD counts this as ambulatory care. Ambulatory care: Care that happens outside of hospitals, which may include general out-patient services, specialist practices and private clinics. Public health: Efforts, usually on the part of governments, to manage the well-being of a population, for example vaccination campaigns, education and disease response. Pharmacies and medical goods: Drugs, syringes, stents, wheelchairs and other purchased goods related to health care. Administration: The overhead costs of health care, from billing to building maintenance, essentially everything not related to patient care in a system. In the U.S., "administrative costs" includes the cost of managing public programs such as Medicaid and Medicare, as well as the administrative costs of the private health insurance industry. Data Sources: OECD Health Data 2009, World Health Organization World Health Report

11

12 Rethinking entire production processes and business models The First is to contract out ever more work The Second money-saver is to use existing technology in imaginative new ways. The Third way to cut costs is to apply mass- production techniques in new and unexpected areas A health-insurance scheme, working with various local self- help groups, that covers 2.5m people for a premium of about 11 cents a month each A sliding scale of fees is used for operations so that richer customers subsidize poorer ones Hospital group reports a 7.7% profit after taxes Dr Shetty has performed more than 15,000 heart operations and other members of his team more than 10,000 Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospital in the “Electronics City” district of Bangalore, has 1,000 beds (against an average of 160 beds in American heart hospitals), and Dr Shetty and his team of 40-odd cardiologists perform about 600 operations a week.

13

14 Creating Fable 2.0 Like its predecessor, the Fable 2.0 hospital is an imaginary facility located in a medium-sized American city. It is a new three-hundred-bed regional medical center built to replace a fifty-year- old institution. Fable 2.0 provides a comprehensive range of inpatient and ambulatory services. It is located on a donated urban site, so the cost of the land is not included in the calculations. Fable 2.0 is approximately 600,000 square feet (2,000 square feet per bed) and costs $350 million to construct. Construction costs have increased substantially since According to Turner Construction, the average cost per square foot in an average city has more than doubled, from between $170 and $185 per square foot, to approximately $450 per square foot today. While construction costs in some areas are significantly higher or lower, we chose $450 per square foot as our baseline. Fable hospital's leadership promotes superior clinical quality, safety, patient-focused care, family friendliness, staff support, efficiency, community responsibility, and ecological sustainability. Reflecting the latter goal, Fable 2.0 decided to achieve a sustainable building that met LEED's gold- certified level using a range of construction and operational initiatives. American Hospital Association Resource Center Blog

15

16

17 The future of healthcare in Africa, A report from the Economist Intelligence Unit, sponsored by Janssen Treatable diseases continue to blight the future The continent’s continuing struggle with communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB), parasitic diseases and poor primary and obstetric care has been a major factor in stalling the development and the extension of healthcare services in African countries at the most basic level.

18 The future of healthcare in Africa, A report from the Economist Intelligence Unit, sponsored by Janssen

19

20 The Business of Health in Africa, IFC, World Bank Group

21 Consistent with international trends, this growth in GDP will drive a greater demand for health care and an increase in per capita expenditure on health related goods and services Based on projected economic and population growth rates, the health care expenditure in Sub- Saharan Africa is expected to grow from $16.7 billion in 2005 to $35 billion in 2016 an annual growth rate of 7.1 percent per annum. This report also estimates that around $25–$30 billion in incremental investment will be required for the physical assets (hospitals, clinics, distribution warehouses, etc.) needed to meet this increased demand over the next ten years.

22 The Business of Health in Africa, IFC, World Bank Group

23 The priorities include: 1. Developing mechanisms for creating and enforcing quality standards for health services and medical product manufacturing and distribution; 2. Including as many of the population as possible in risk pooling programs; 3. Channeling a portion of public and donor funds through the private health sector; 4. Enacting local regulations that are more encouraging of a private health care sector; and 5. Improving access to capital, including by increasing the ability of local financial institutions to support private health care enterprises.

24 ANALYSIS OF HOSPITAL COSTS: A MANUAL FOR MANAGERS, by Donald S. Shepard, Ph.D., Dominic Hodgkin, Ph.D. and Yvonne Anthony, Ph.D., September 29, 1998, Institute for Health Policy, Heller School, Brandeis University

25 * This row represent totals for columns with heading beginning with “Total,” and averages for other columns. + All monetary amounts are in thousands of F CFA, where 1,000 F CFA equals US $2.00. Côte d’Ivoire, 1995 Côte d’Ivoire, 1995 ANALYSIS OF HOSPITAL COSTS: A MANUAL FOR MANAGERS, by Donald S. Shepard, Ph.D., Dominic Hodgkin, Ph.D. and Yvonne Anthony, Ph.D., September 29, 1998, Institute for Health Policy, Heller School, Brandeis University

26

27

28 PatientPatient FreeFreePaidPaidCombinedCombined Self Paid Fully Insured DonorsDonors Impact Investor Seed Investor GovernmentGovernment OperatorOperator OPEXOPEX RecoveriesRecoveries CAPEXCAPEX Volunteer NGO

29 Information Management Systems Procurement Governance Optimized Design Solutions Logistics & Supply Chain Resources & Training Marketing & Sales Performance Monitoring

30 GrowthGrowth InnovationInnovation OptimizationOptimization OPEXOPEX Recovery Plan CAPEXCAPEX SubscriptionsSubscriptions Self-Paid Patients Insurance Policies

31 Target CAPEX US$ 150k/Bed Target CAPEX US$ 150k/Bed GFA 20,000 m2 100 m2/Bed GFA 20,000 m2 100 m2/Bed Public Basic Infrastructure Minimum Area 50,000 m2 Minimum Area 50,000 m2 FAR 0.4 Single Story FAR 0.4 Single Story Accessible to Public Transit 160 Ward Bed 20 Single Bed 20 Double Beds 160 Ward Bed 20 Single Bed 20 Double Beds ER 200 Visits/Day ER 200 Visits/Day OP 20 Clinics OP 20 Clinics ICU 10 Beds ICU 10 Beds FF&E Cost US$ 2,000/m2 FF&E Cost US$ 2,000/m2 Target Profitability 5% Target Profitability 5% Served Population 200,000 Capita Served Population 200,000 Capita CSR, Vocational and Volunteer Programs Compliances to WB. IFC, UNDP & ADB Codes Compliances to WB. IFC, UNDP & ADB Codes Independent Operating Corporate Target OPEX US$ 2,000/Case Target OPEX US$ 2,000/Case Construction Cost US$ 2,000/m2 Construction Cost US$ 2,000/m2 EPC Contract 18 Months EPC Contract 18 Months Strong Payors Programs

32 H1/Year -2H2/Year -1H2/Year 1H1/Year 1H1/Year -1H2/Year -2 ESC Corporate & Capacity Building Hospital EPC, FF&E and FM Corporate Social Contribution Plan Organization Strategy & BD Finance Organization Strategy & BD Finance Logistics Engineering Quality Logistics Engineering Quality Procurement of Contractors, Operators & Suppliers Procurement of Contractors, Operators & Suppliers FF&E FM Operator FF&E DLP Medical Operations Marketing & Sales Operations Implementing CSR Programs EPC HR Legal Procurement HR Legal Procurement Sales Marketing Internal Audit Sales Marketing Internal Audit Planning CSR Programs EPC DLP

33


Download ppt " Penetrate New Markets: Evaluate opportunities in different geographies, in other parts of the value chain, and through new lines of business  Grow."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google