Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

LIST QUESTIONS – COMPARISONS BETWEEN MODES AND WAVES Making Connections is a study of ten disadvantaged US urban communities, funded by the Annie E. Casey.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "LIST QUESTIONS – COMPARISONS BETWEEN MODES AND WAVES Making Connections is a study of ten disadvantaged US urban communities, funded by the Annie E. Casey."— Presentation transcript:

1 LIST QUESTIONS – COMPARISONS BETWEEN MODES AND WAVES Making Connections is a study of ten disadvantaged US urban communities, funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. This poster examines one aspect of survey administration that has implications for longitudinal surveys using a mixed-mode design: differences in responses given in person with the aid of showcards compared to those given over the telephone without showcard use and the substantive impact of multi-mode administration. In the first wave of data collection for Making Connections, all interviews were completed in person. Due to cost constraints, subsequent interviews were completed by telephone when a telephone number was available and the respondent was willing to participate by telephone. When interviews were conducted by telephone, all response options for each question were read to the respondent. If the interview was completed in person, response options were read and respondents were shown a card that enumerated the response options. Questions selected for showcard facilitation were those with a long list of possible responses or those with a scaled response. Showcards are frequently used in surveys because they ease the burden of remembering response options and therefore improve data quality by reducing satisficing or primacy and recency effects (Holbrook, Green, and Krosnick, 2003). We compare the substantive data collected within and across the two modes of administration between the in-person only group and the in- person/telephone group to explore the potential unintended consequences of attempts to ease respondent burden through the use of showcards and other interview aids. We draw from prior comparisons of interview modes (Roberts, Jäckle, and Lynn 2007, etc.) to investigate differences associated with telephone and in-person interviewing for questions where showcards were used and where they were not. Making Connections is a neighborhood-based longitudinal survey Interviews completed in person only in W1, by phone and in person in W2 Mode in W2 was based on respondent preference i.e. not random Questions concerning neighborhood engagement, children, income and assets, and perceptions of neighborhood Approximately 45% of households stayed in the same housing unit in both waves and of those 90% had the same respondent in both waves Of these households, about half completed a second interview over the phone Research Questions: How does this affect responses to scales and questions with many response categories? Does this make a difference in responses given between waves and for different modes? METHODOLOGY INTRODUCTION DEMOGRAPHICS SHOWCARD EXAMPLES SCALE QUESTIONS – COMPARISONS BETWEEN WAVES SCALE QUESTIONS - COMPARISONS BETWEEN MODES DISCUSSION Showcard use and mixed-mode administration in longitudinal surveys: Are the data comparable? Beth Fisher, Ned English, Catherine Haggerty – NORC at the University of Chicago Identify households Do not include any households that completed an interview through a proxy, or for which an interview was completed with a non-English speaker without a translated instrument in either wave. Use households that have not moved between waves and have the same respondent selected in both Waves 1 and 2 (n=2,197) Compare W1 and W2 responses based on the mode they completed the survey in during Wave 2 (in person or phone) Analysis of List Questions Compare the proportion of “yes” responses given for lists of questions that use showcards between respondents interviewed in person and those interviewed by phone in W2 Calculate differences to identify trends in response patterns Use binomial tests for significance testing of proportions for “yes” responses for each category in list questions Using W2 mode categories, compare W1 responses in the same manner to look for similar patterns in responses Analysis of Scale Questions Compare the categories selected by respondents interviewed in person and those interviewed by phone in W2 for a variety of questions Based on observed patterns, collapse responses into two categories Use binomial tests for significance testing of proportions in the two collapsed categories Using W2 mode categories, compare W1 responses in the same manner to look for similar patterns in responses ABSTRACT W2 In PersonW2 by Phone Total Number of Households54% (1172)46% (1025) Mean Size of Household Percent of Households with Children4744 Mean Age of Respondent Percentage of Female Respondents6570 Percentage of Hispanic Respondents35 a 24 a Percentage of Respondents with a High School Degree or Higher 65 b 79 b Percentage of Respondents who are Employed 5154 Percent of Households That Have Had their Phone Cut Off in the Last Twelve Months 18 c 8c8c Percentage of Respondents Rated as Having Fair or Poor Understanding of Questions by the Interviewer 14 d 11 d Percent of Respondents Rated as Being Friendly and Interested by the Interviewer 9896 Positive difference associated with increased proportion of in-person respondents selecting category. Negative difference associated with increased proportion of telephone respondents selecting category. Scale Type Collapsed Into following categories, compared between modes No. of questions with differences between new categories Trend Non- Significant Significant 1) Five options, all listed on showcard Selecting ‘short’ or ‘long’ option (eg. agree vs strongly agree) 310 Higher proportion of in-person Rs selected ‘long’ responses for all questions 2) Seven options from 1 to 7. Agree/disagree, satisfied/dissatisfied, or likely/unlikely with three categories labeled Selecting labeled category or an unlabeled category 35 Higher proportion of in-person Rs selected labeled response categories for all questions 3) Seven options from 0 to 6 for rare/common occurrence with three categories labeled, including ‘does not occur’ Selecting labeled category or an unlabeled category 56 Higher proportion of in-person Rs selected labeled response categories for all questions but one, which had essentially equal proportions Positive difference is associated with a higher proportion of Telephone respondents answering yes to the particular category * * * * * * * * * Indicates difference is significant at p<.05 * * * * * * Neither Agree nor Disagree * * * * * * * * * Indicates difference is significant at p<.05. Comparisons of differences outlined in chart above. Summary of Chart types for Scaled Response Options * Subscript between pairs indicates significant difference at p<.05 * Indicates difference is significant at p<.05. Comparisons of differences outlined in chart above. * Indicates difference is significant at p<.05 Overall, there are response differences between the two groups. However, it is important to note that the interview mode was determined through non-random procedures resulting in selection bias. Because of this, demographic or other factors may be responsible for some of the differences in response patterns between modes. For list questions, mode does not appear to make a substantial difference when taking W1 response patterns into consideration. The differences between proportions of each group responding ‘yes’ to an item may be the result of demographic differences between the two mode groups. With respect to scaled question responses, how showcard use influences the data appears to depend on the particular scale. For questions where all options are listed on the showcard, it seems to encourage selection of ‘longer’ responses among in-person respondents. For other scales, however, in-person respondents selected options that were labeled on the showcards in higher proportions than those interviewed by telephone, who would not be influenced by the visual cues associated with labels on the showcards. Future research based on this preliminary investigation should include models to control for interview mode and demographic variables. As for practical implications, it is possible to build in procedures in subsequent waves where showcards are mailed to respondents in case they complete by phone. However, based on this research, inclusion of certain lists or scales in the showcards may not be beneficial. An experimental design would help to determine how showcards affect response patterns and also help to determine the showcard presentation that best facilitates unbiased data capture.


Download ppt "LIST QUESTIONS – COMPARISONS BETWEEN MODES AND WAVES Making Connections is a study of ten disadvantaged US urban communities, funded by the Annie E. Casey."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google