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Report of the Task Force on Cyberlearning and Workforce Development National Science Foundation Science Advisory Committee (SAB) January 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Report of the Task Force on Cyberlearning and Workforce Development National Science Foundation Science Advisory Committee (SAB) January 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Report of the Task Force on Cyberlearning and Workforce Development National Science Foundation Science Advisory Committee (SAB) January 2011

2 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development TASK FORCE CHARGE The workforce for the 21 st century must be cyberinfrastructure savvy if it is to be competitive in the international marketplace. Education is no longer K-12, but rather a lifelong endeavor effecting not only future scientist and engineers but also the general citizenry. Cyberinfrastructure serves a dual role in learning and workforce development. 1. Our next generation of scientists and engineers must be prepared to incorporate the tools of cyber- infrastructure within the context of interdisciplinary research, which requires learning new methods to observe, acquire, manipulate, and store data. 2. The general population must be effectively trained; individuals who experience opportunities to work with and learn through networked environments learn new ways of doing old things or new ways of doing new things, both essential in an increasingly competitive world.

3 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development TASK FORCE CHARGE The charge to the group comes directly from Chapter 5 of the Cyberinfrastructure Vision for 21 st Century Discovery that identified the following goals in the area of workforce development:  Foster the broad deployment and utilization of CI- enabled learning and research environments  Support the development of new skills and professions needed for full realization of CI-enabled opportunities;  Promote broad participation of underserved groups, communities and institutions, both as creators and users of CI;  Stimulate new developments and continual improvements of CI-enabled learning and research environments;

4 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development TASK FORCE CHARGE  Facilitate CI-enabled lifelong learning opportunities ranging from the enhancement of public understanding of science to meeting the needs of the workforce seeking continuing professional development;  Support programs that encourage faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research in computational science and computational science curriculum development;  Support the development of programs that connect K-12 students and educators with the types of computational thinking and computational tools that are being facilitated by cyberinfrastructure.

5 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development TASK FORCE SUBCOMMITTEES Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development and Higher Education, Geoffrey Fox, Indiana University Cyberlearning Nora Sabelli, SRI International Renato Figueiredo, University of Florida Campus Bridging and Education Gary Bertoline, Purdue University Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development: Implications for K-14, Training, and Informal Science Education Diane Baxter, San Diego Supercomputer Center Broadening Participation and Cyberinfrastructure Alex Ramirez, Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities

6 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development and Higher Education –Geoffrey Fox, Indiana University, (Chair & TF co-Chair) –James M. Bowers, University of Texas at San Antonio –Armando Fox, University of California, Berkeley –Sharon Glotzer, University of Michigan –Ruben Landau, Oregon State University –Bob Panoff, Shodor Education Foundation –Juan Vargas, Microsoft

7 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development and Higher Education Observations  On one hand we see the computational transformation of research and development in engineering and the sciences that hasn’t occurred in education;  on the other a pervasive and ubiquitous electronic environment is being provided by the emergence of the Continuous Collaborative Computational Cloud (C4), in which we and especially the new “net generation” of students are immersed.

8 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development and Higher Education Observations  Mismatch between workforce needs & education  Need more support for interdisciplinary work within the university hierarchy  The rigidity of higher education institutions and the challenge of outdated requirements in the curriculum  Challenges of data intensive science

9 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development CI Workforce Development and Higher Education Observations  A systemic change in college-level curricula is needed in which science and computation are better integrated, and thereby provide better preparation of students and improved learning. While practitioners in the 1980’s were content to have students wait until graduate school to learn what is inside the computational black box, there is now a broadly held view that this is one symptom of a set of problems in undergraduate science education that need immediate attention:

10 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development CI Workforce Development and Higher Education Observations  Science education has yet to recognize that science has undergone a transformation in which computation has become an essential element.  Students are not being prepared for this paradigm change.  Science curriculum must incorporate more computation and more problem solving to meet the demands graduates will encounter when entering the workforce  New multidisciplinary curricula with real world computational problems are needed because the traditional CS curricula are not addressing real-world needs  A different pedagogy focused on problem-based learning is needed.  Students need exposure to cross-disciplinary research and computation.  New curricular materials that integrate computation with science are needed.  An online repository for curriculum sharing and information dissemination is needed.

11 C 4 Continuous Collaborative Computational Cloud C4C4 I N T E L I G L E N C E Motivating Issues job / education mismatch Higher Ed rigidity Interdisciplinary work Engineering v Science, Little v. Big science Modeling & Simulation CDSE C 4 Intelligent Economy C 4 Intelligent People Stewards of C 4 Intelligent Society NSF Educate “Net Generation” Re-educate pre “Net Generation” in Science and Engineering Exploiting and developing C 4 C 4 Stewards C 4 Curricula, programs C 4 Experiences (delivery mechanism) C 4 REUs, Internships, Fellowships Computational Thinking Internet & Cyberinfrastructure Higher Education Subgroup

12 C4 = Continuous Collaborative Computational Cloud C4 EMERGING VISION While the internet has changed the way we communicate and get entertainment, we need to empower the next generation of engineers and scientists with technology that enables interdisciplinary collaboration for lifelong learning. Today, the cloud is a set of services that people intently have to access (from laptops, desktops, etc). In 2020 the C4 will be part of our lives, as a larger, pervasive, continuous experience. The measure of success will be how “invisible” it becomes. C4 Education Vision C4 Education will exploit advanced means of communication, for example, “Tabatars” conference tables, with real-time language translation, contextual awareness of speakers, in terms of the area of knowledge and level of expertise of participants to ensure correct semantic translation, and to ensure that people with disabilities can participate. While we are no prophets and we can’t anticipate what exactly will work, we expect to have high bandwidth and ubiquitous connectivity for everyone everywhere, even in rural areas (using power-efficient micro data centers the size of shoe boxes) C4 Society Vision

13 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development C4 Education Vision for Content C 4 leads to different ways of presenting content from immersive sites to the rampant use of simulation  Didactic vs. inquiry driven self learning (core concept)  User directed  Teacher as mentor rather than teacher as expert  Expert knowledge built into digital-based learning system  Push vs. Pull (core concept)  The Internet search engine as an example of seeking (pulling) rather than pushing information  External pressure vs. internal motivation for learners  Digital environments arrayed around content vs. content converted to digital form  Current publishing model, sell the textbook, make money on the digital attachments.  Digital assets will become central, content will be arrayed around them

14 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development C4 Education Vision for Content  Curriculum vs. Games  Gaming and Play are how primates learn not by reading a given chapter.  In principle, properly constructed games allow users to interact with the ‘thing’ itself  Storyboards vs. simulations:  One of the core transformations allowed by Cyber technology is replacement of storyboarded curriculum  Most ‘educational gaming’ efforts at the moment are story board based  Models and simulations should be at the base  Interacting with the physics directly through models and simulations  The technology is then in motivating and exposing users to the underlying physical structure  Intrinsic Interdisciplinary Studies  Not individual studies of biology / physics / math as in linear textbooks  Built around challenges and problems  Integrating disciplines

15 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development C4 Education Vision for Content  Central (Publisher. Author) generated vs. Stakeholder generated  Digital structures adaptive and modifiable, by students, teachers & parents  Kids making games for kids  Summative vs. formative evaluation  Periodic (end of chapter, end of year) vs. continuous reporting  Explicit link back to professional development (through games and simulations)

16 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development and Higher Education Recommendations  The core recommendation is that NSF assume C4 is the new reality and must structure its programs to encourage bold revolutionary proposals that build in the communication models of the future Internet and target fully the generations whose life style assumes it. We recommend that NSF focus on revolutionary rather than evolutionary (such as adding data mining courses to Computational Science education or simply transferring textbook organized curriculum into digital textbooks) approaches as it has a much greater potential payoff. A key aspect of the revolutionary approach which we termed C 4 is to adopt the Internet architecture ab initio – rather than using it to augment existing programs, materials or curriculum

17 Cyberlearning and Higher Education Subcommittee Recommendations Cont’d  NSF should fund new programs that integrate research and education, and the exploitation of transformative technologies (e.g., cyberlearning). We recommend a suite of inter- disciplinary programs, with industry partnerships, with these features: Emphasis on computational and data enabled science and engineering Integration of research and education Study of social aspects of large-scale distributed research Collaboration with cognitive scientists Development of new curricula Conduct research across Big/little science, social sciences, engineering, computer science

18 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Cyberlearning –Nora Sabelli, SRI International (co-chair) –Renato Figueiredo, University of Florida (co-chair) –Jim Gee, Arizona State University –Mark Guzdial, Georgia Tech –Anthony Eamonn Kelly, George Mason University –Kenneth Koedinger, Carnegie Mellon University –Krishna P. C. Madhaven, Purdue University –Roy Pea, Stanford University

19 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Cyberlearning Cyberlearning: learning that is mediated by computational devices and CI Observations  Need for a “platform perspective”- shared, interoperable designs of hardware, software, and services  Pervasive access to CI means that learners can access resources across formal and informal settings, blurring the boundaries, based on interest, curiosity and engagement rather than an externally imposed curriculum. Once these boundaries are blurred, the similar boundaries of grades and even K-16 can blur, and we can use CI to truly create seamless learning.  Imperative to understand and support multiple pathways to acquiring competencies and knowledge  The need to develop the interdisciplinary aspects of interagency responsibilities for the process of research-based large-scale improvement of educational practice

20 Cyberlearning Recommendations  We recommend the promotion and support of a new cross- disciplinary community that will perform not only the transformative research called for in recent reports, but also the work of translating this research for use by increasingly varied research, development, and implementation communities. This new community should significantly increase the degree to which all groups participate in STEM education, research and the workforce, while transforming the CI tools and resources in innovative ways based on increased understanding of effective STEM education practices for diverse audiences, from pre-K to Gray. It could generate a new inter-disciplinary thinking by merging the knowledge and insights of two communities that are in fast but separate evolution: the technological and the cognitive, the last one with its neurocognitive and learning research expertise.

21 Cyberlearning Recommendations  We recommend involvement of research, education, and industry in a functional, robust and sustained process for addressing two critical challenges of systemic change: (1) Defining the skills and knowledge essential to support a strong national and internationally connected economy and workforce; and (2) Developing models for educational system organization and processes that can respond quickly and appropriately to rapidly changing technologies. NSF should include the development of a systemic strategy for encouraging the cumulativity of outcomes from this work, including the integration of proper assessment instrumentation of cyberlearning software.

22 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development: Implications for K-14, Training, and Informal Science Education –Diane Baxter, San Diego Supercomputer Center –Henry J. Neeman, University of Oklahoma –Scott Lathrop, TeraGrid –Tony Baylis, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory –John Ziebarth, Krell Institute –Ed Abeyta, University of California, San Diego –Eddie Wiziecki, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana

23 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development: Implications for K-14, Training, and Informal Science Education Observations:  Knowledge seekers are empowered by cyber-based learning that can be personalized to address their individual needs, styles, and level of knowledge.  Cyberlearning changes some of the basic foundational paradigms of how people learn and conduct computational thinking and research.  Workforce development can be an effective driver for needed systemic change if thoughtfully planned, designed and leveraged for sustainability  New program implementation requires well-defined metrics that allow for measuring short-term and long-term impacts toward targeted goals

24 Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development: Implications for K-14, Training, and Informal Science Education cont’d Recommendations:  Focus on lifelong learning and professional development - Students and workers need skills and competencies that reflect the latest scientific and technological advances, fueling the need for lifelong learning  Support research on methods for attracting and retaining a diverse STEM Workforce –investigates approaches and methods for using Cyberlearning tools and media to stimulate interest in STEM  Support research in cyberlearning – NSF should devote significant resources to research in cyberlearning, exploring meaningful metrics for assessing the needs of all learners, and the learning impacts of cyberlearning resources  Manage cyberlearning resources – Investigate data and resource platforms and metadata for efficient access by diverse audiences and purposes. NSF should support the creation of a standard framework that will serve as an aggregator  Promote modeling and simulation; quantitative reasoning, and parallel methods throughout the lifelong learning process.

25 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Campus Bridging and Education Gary Bertoline, Purdue University (co-chair) Michael Mundrane, University of California, Berkeley Russ Hobby, Internet 2, University of California, Davis (retired) Thomas J. Hacker, Purdue University? Jill Arnold, Internet 2 Jan E. Odegard, Rice University

26 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Campus Bridging and Education Observations  Cyberinfrastructure developed and utilized for specific disciplines may only function at a level suitable for discipline domain research and graduate level education.  Local access through the campus or national infrastructure has been met with serious barriers in usability, availability, reliability, and interoperability  Cyberinfrastructure development supported by NSF has been primarily in support of Big Science and the top 2 layers of Branscomb’s Pyramid  For cyber learning and workforce development to truly move forward, a coherent and coordinated national vision must be created to integrate and develop both private consumer- and public-based cyber tools, infrastructure, and capabilities

27 Campus Bridging and Education cont’d Recommendations:  Create Cyberinfrastructure Institutes (CII) of academic, industry, nonprofit, and government partners working together to develop sustainable cyberlearning, broadening participation, interdisciplinary computational and data intensive science and engineering curricula, and computational thinking programs and campus infrastructure in support of research and education. The campus infrastructure would include the shared hiring and training of staff and faculty and the sharing of knowledge to build and maintain the workforce of skilled programmers, systems staff, and user support staff needed to sustain the national CI enterprise including supercomputing resources,.

28 Campus Bridging and Education cont’d Recommendations:  Develop a comprehensive, cogent, and accessible CI architecture to support cyberlearning and workforce development nationwide, and the incorporation and repurposing of CI-enabled STEM research tools and resources for educational purposes. To accomplish this, the NSF should convene and maintain a broad- based advisory group to establish the vision and requirements, and both nurture and facilitate the recommended actions described in this document.

29 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Broadening Participation and Cyberinfrastructure –Alex Ramirez, Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (chair) –Mike Stubblefield, Southern University –Linda B. Hayden, Elizabeth City State University –Tom Davis, Navajo Technical College –Susan Gerhart, semi-retired computer scientist and author “As Your World Changes: Adjusting to Vision Loss with Class, Using Technology,” –Lecia Barker, University of Texas at Austin –Al Kuslikis, American Indian Higher Education Consortium

30 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Broadening Participation and Cyberinfrastructure Observations:  Rapidly changing demographics in schools, colleges and nation  Long-standing issue in STEM of the underrepresentation of women, persons with disabilities and underrepresented minorities which is problematic because  science and engineering needs the diversity of perspective that these groups bring to spur the innovation of STEM and  the nation will simply not be able to meet its STEM workforce requirements without them.

31 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Broadening Participation and Cyberinfrastructure Observations:  Issue is urgent because  of the rapid growth of URM in population  Much of STEM is lacking participation of half the population  Our current scientific and economic leadership is unsustainable without their full participation  Well used, cyberinfrastructure can  motivate and prepare these groups to be part of a better educated next generation of undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs and professorate, and  can renew the hope and promise of education as the means of inclusion for those that continue to be left out of the STEM endeavor and the intellectual, economic and social benefits to STEM, the nation and the individual

32 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Broadening Participation and Cyberinfrastructure Recommendations:  We recommend that the NSF provide national leadership in broadening participation toward the elimination of underrepresentation of women, persons with disabilities and minorities and towards programmatic development of the science of broadening participation. ; Leadership starts with agency-wide requirements; authentic interagency, state and local government and industry collaborations with shared responsibility and team effort; and promotion of effective practices and strategies..  Include broadening participation of women, persons with disabilities and underrepresented minorities as a specific requirement for proposals, and pay to it close budgetary and programmatic attention, rather than just one of many possible broader impacts

33 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Broadening Participation and Cyberinfrastructure Recommendations:  We recommend significantly involving minority-serving institutions by enhancing their capacity as efficient and effective mechanisms for meaningfully engaging minorities and eradicating their underrepresentation in STEM. Toward that end, NSF should help build the research, education, and student retention and advancement capacity of MSIs. As under-resourced institutions, MSIs could particularly benefit from the incorporation and repurposing of CI-enabled science and engineering research tools and resources, provided such efforts reflect the specific educational and cultural needs of the students served.

34 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development Broadening Participation and Cyberinfrastructure Recommendations:  We recommend bolstering the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP), the Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP) as well as a Hispanic- Serving Institutions Program (HSIP) that should be established as cross-cutting programs across the NSF directorates, similar to the ADVANCE program. This can enable directorates to focus on this issue and these institutions, and direct more general efforts for elimination of underrepresentation to particular sciences or areas of engineering and their particular needs and demands.

35 Discussion

36 Cyberinfrastructure Workforce Development and Higher Education Observations  Need more support for interdisciplinary work within the university hierarchy  Challenges of working in the academic environments in interdisciplinary areas, particularly with rapid development/obsolescence of CS technologies  Interdisciplinary work is hampered by a lack of understanding of “Computational X” by colleagues and university administrators  Interdisciplinary examples/modules for education should not require that the instructor be expert in all disciplines.  Students in all disciplines participating in interdisciplinary projects should complete more math and CS courses with practical labs to prepare them for more active involvement in the development and use of C 4 applications  Students should begin working regularly in interdisciplinary groups  Should not restrict teaching “computational thinking” to students majoring in computer science and other STEM disciplines  NSF has had an enormous impact on research, but relatively modest impact on education.

37 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development CI Workforce Development and Higher Education Observations  The rigidity of higher education institutions and the challenge of outdated requirements in the curriculum  Difficult to change course requirements to allow interdisciplinary or computational classes.  Graduate science and engineering research augmented by CI is well accepted; however there is no clear agreement on “what is Computational Thinking/ Computational and data enabled science and engineering/Cyberinfrastructure” and “what is its core curricula/knowledge”. For example the role of “computational thinking” outside CS is unclear.  Need more incentives for faculty and universities to make needed changes.  Many CS faculty stress teaching fundamentals and dismiss “emerging technologies” as transitory and faddish.  What are the possibilities for using distance or innovative online learning systems?

38 Cyberlearning and Workforce Development CI Workforce Development and Higher Education Observations  Challenges of data intensive science  Training data scientists is growing in importance, as is the demand for data mining  The need for sharing data is generating new challenges  Data for research is growing dramatically in size but this fact is not sufficiently reflected in education  What are the relative roles in data-related education of computer science, statistics, bioinformatics and application areas that use data?  OCI has a big science emphasis. Support is needed for the “long tail” of “modest-sized” science and engineering.


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