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Maximizing Your Human Capital Cindy Patterson Cheryl Bishop August 9-10, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Maximizing Your Human Capital Cindy Patterson Cheryl Bishop August 9-10, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Maximizing Your Human Capital Cindy Patterson Cheryl Bishop August 9-10, 2012

2 Common Board Configuration Date: August 10, 2012 Benchmark: Leaders will evaluate and describe the current practices that promote inclusion within the individual school setting Bell Ringer : TEAM Acrostic poem Essential Question: How can school leaders effectively maximize their use of human resources to impact achievement of all students? Vocabulary: inclusion; support facilitation, co-teaching Objective: Understand best practice for inclusive classrooms; Identify the different approaches to co-teaching and support facilitation. Agenda: Gradual Release I do: Survey participants; Review vocabulary We do: Discuss co-teaching models; Make connections to High Effect Indicators and 21 st Century Skills You do: Weigh pros and cons of inclusion. Agenda: Gradual Release I do: Survey participants; Review vocabulary We do: Discuss co-teaching models; Make connections to High Effect Indicators and 21 st Century Skills You do: Weigh pros and cons of inclusion. Summarizing Activity: Reflect on the information presented and write a reflection of your school and where your school stands with regards to inclusion. Summarizing Activity: Reflect on the information presented and write a reflection of your school and where your school stands with regards to inclusion. Homework: Meet with the teachers at your school and design a plan that will meet the needs of all the students in your school. Homework: Meet with the teachers at your school and design a plan that will meet the needs of all the students in your school. Learning Goal: To gain knowledge of inclusive practices that can be implemented in the general education classroom.

3 Lake County Schools Vision StatementVision Statement A dynamic, progressive and collaborative learning community embracing change and diversity where every student will graduate with the skills needed to succeed in postsecondary education and the workplace. Mission StatementMission Statement The mission of the Lake County Schools is to provide every student with individual opportunities to excel. Lake County Schools is committed to excellence in all curricular opportunities and instructional best practices. This focus area addresses closing the achievement gap, increased graduation rate, decreased dropout rate, increase in Level 3 and above scores on the FCAT, achieving an increase in the number of students enrolled in advanced placement and dual enrollment opportunities and implementing the best practices in instructional methodology. Summer Leadership Institute

4 21 st Century Skills Tony Wagner, The Global Achievement Gap Summer Leadership Institute 1. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 2.Collaboration and Leadership 3. Agility and Adaptability 4. Initiative and Entrepreneurialism 5. Effective Oral and Written Communication 6. Accessing and Analyzing Information 7. Curiosity and Imagination

5 High Effect Size IndicatorsHigh Effect Size Indicators Summer Leadership Institute “The Department’s identified set of indicators on high effect size instructional and leadership strategies with a causal relationship to student learning growth constitute priority issues for deliberate practice and faculty development.” -Florida Department of Education, 2012

6 Learning Goal with Scales Tracking Student Progress Established Content Standards Multi-tiered System of Supports Clear Goals Text Complexity ESOL Students Summer Leadership Institute School Leadership High Effect Indicators Classroom Teacher High Effect Indicators Feedback Practices Facilitating Professional Learning Clear Goals and Expectations Instructional Resources High Effect Size Strategies Instructional Initiatives Monitoring Text Complexity Interventions Instructional Adaptations ESOL Strategies

7 What makes inclusion work? Effective Instructional Strategies Teaming and Relationship Building Vision and Attitudes Professional Development Common Planning Time Administrative Support Family Involvement Accommodations and Support Systems

8 What does inclusion look like? Inclusion The action or state of including or of being included within a group or structure: "the inclusion of students with disabilities” A person or thing that is included within a larger group or structure. Support Facilitation A service provided by an ESE teacher to provide specially designed instruction/services to support ESE students' achievement in the general education classroom.

9 ______________ ______________________ _____________________

10 TWO TEACHERS TEAMING! TEACH to EVERYONE! TRUST! TALENT! TIMELINESS! EXPECTATIONS should be clear and shared! ENCOURAGE and support one another! ENVIRONMENT should be supportive and non-threatening! EXPERTISE = subject area vs. strategies EMPOWERMENT! ACCESSIBLE curriculum! AGREEMENT of shared procedures in the classroom! ALERT one another to problems or issues! APPLICATION of co-teaching models! ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT is the goal! ADMINISTRATIVE support is imperative! MAKING time for collaborative planning! MONITOR student success! MANAGE classroom activities and structure! MANTRA: Exemplify “ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN!”

11 How do the general education teacher and the ESE teacher collaborate? Support Facilitation Class ratio Relationships Volunteer Assigned by personality or expertise Assigned for convenience Assigned for experience Assigned by master schedule Assigned by availability Planning Roles

12 Your Turn to Talk What methods are utilized in your school to build relationships and collaboration in your school?

13 Co-Teaching Models One Teach, One Support Parallel Teaching Station Teaching Alternative Teaching Teaming

14 One Teach, One Support Teacher A instructs whole class. Teacher B supports.

15 Parallel Teaching Students face their group’s teacher. Teacher A Teacher B

16 Station Teaching

17 Alternative Teaching

18 Teaming Teacher A Teacher B

19 INCLUSION SUVEY RESULTS

20 Positive Outcomes: What do teachers say?? The handicap student is not the only one who benefits; there is also plenty to learn in these settings about difference and tolerance No one knows who are special needs and Gen-ed students. Most people who would walk into my classroom would never suspect that I have inclusion students in the classroom. all kids are part of the learning process Our 5th grade inclusion model works effectively because both teachers have an active role in the classroom. Regular ed students and ESE students both receive assistance when needed. Students are grouped by need not by a label. With two active, cooperative teachers in the room needs are met for all students allowing them to grow and learn. Many of our students achieve even more than their families had thought possible.

21 Positive Outcomes Provides positive role models May lead to greater acceptance Greater academic achievement Increased opportunities for interaction Sense on community and inclusiveness Students no longer are “visitors” in their classrooms

22 Not have inclusion. No matter how you look at this someone is going to be cut short. If you take the disabled students out then they will not develop well socially. If you leave them in then another student will suffer due to the time spent with the disabled child. I prefer to error with the mass or larger majority. If it were your child in the regular ed. classroom what would you think? Hurdles: What do teachers say??

23 Students who have demonstrated that they are not capable of functioning at a standard level be placed in classes where there level of achievement is possible so that they do experience the frustration of a normal classroom. Students with behavior issues make teaching the larger classes very difficult. If the students with behavior issues did not dominate the classroom I would have more time to devote to students with learning disabilities. I feel that I often don't meet the needs of the all the students because my time is taken up dealing with poor behavior, especially during the many times when there is not a co-teacher. I had two classes this year of inclusion students. Due to scheduling, my 4th period class had 65% inclusion students in it. That class was challenging. I understand that the recommended percentage is around 30%. To be fair to other students and to be in the spirit of inclusion, you really should make sure that gen ed teachers don't get overwhelmed like that.

24 Hurdles Attitudes Common planning time Demands of coursework Staffing and support Behavioral concerns Training

25 Your turn to talk What practices, routines, or structures of your school might currently be barriers to including students with disabilities?

26 How can we breakdown the barriers? Logistics Shared planning time Class composition Scheduling Number of Teachers needed Professional Development Inclusionary practices Instructional strategies Teacher selection Volunteer vs. assigning Shared vision Student selection Needs of the student One size does not fit all Leadership role

27 The Leadership Role and Responsibilities in Inclusive Practices Understanding needs of students and staff Commitment to inclusive practices (all children can learn) Develop the framework for effective program design (co-teaching) Support

28 Framework for effective program design Describe ideal outcome (vision) Identify the context and resources Establish timelines Use of feedback

29 Summarizing activity What would inclusion look like in your school? What are your skills for facilitating change? What is the context for creating change? What are your resources?

30 Need assistance? Cindy Patterson ESE Program/Staffing Specialist Specific Learning Disabilities and Gifted Cheryl Bishop ESE Program/Staffing Specialist Intellectually Disabled

31 Participant Scale and Reflection (Please complete and turn in) 0-Not Using No understanding or implementatio n steps taken away 1-Beginning Little understanding and inconsistent implementation steps taken away 2-Developing Moderate understanding and implementation steps taken away 3-Applying Consistent understanding and implementation steps taken away along with monitoring componets for effective execution 4-Innovating In addition to criteria of Applying, enhanced understanding, implementation, monitoring, and execution take aways Summer Leadership Institute


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