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Closing the progress gap. Key issues addressed by the study This study explored: – approaches to closing the gap for disadvantaged pupils –effective leadership.

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Presentation on theme: "Closing the progress gap. Key issues addressed by the study This study explored: – approaches to closing the gap for disadvantaged pupils –effective leadership."— Presentation transcript:

1 Closing the progress gap

2 Key issues addressed by the study This study explored: – approaches to closing the gap for disadvantaged pupils –effective leadership for improving the outcomes of the pupils involved

3 Key elements of the study The schools involved trialled a range of strategies and measured their impact on pupil learning

4 Successful projects Projects which were successful in closing the gap recognised the complexity of the leadership needed They were able to –focus on the needs of a specific group of pupils –consider the challenges involved for all members of the school community –develop a broad range of strategies in a multilayered approach

5 Closing the progress gap Projects which made particular progress in closing the gap –clarified their aims and foci –carefully matched intervention approaches to specific pupil needs –identified ways to collect impact data –worked in partnership –provided leadership development and CPD

6 Outcomes for pupils The outcomes for pupils included improved –achievement –attitudes such as greater engagement and enjoyment of learning –transferable skills such as problem-solving, leadership, collaboration and independent learning

7 Improved outcomes Strategies which were reported to result in improved pupil outcomes included: –using mentoring and coaching –focusing on improving basic English and maths skills –involvement of parents –pupil voice activities

8 Using coaching – primary Some of the schools focused on using coaching and mentoring. For example, a group of primary schools: –organised three groups of three key staff in each school to implement changes and compare outcomes –visited each others’ schools to identify good practice which they brought back and shared –continued the strategies into a second year with an increased emphasis on mentoring and coaching of staff by headteachers and middle leaders.

9 Using coaching – secondary Some of the schools focused on using coaching and mentoring. For example, one secondary school: –identified a group of Y10 white working class boys who were under-achieving –arranged group coaching sessions where the pupils discussed their targets, coursework deadlines, organisational and information-gaining strategies –monitored pupils’ progress through teachers’ observations and records and pupil evaluation journals

10 Focusing on basic skills – primary Some of the schools focused on improving basic skills in maths and English. For example, one primary school: –identified pupils whose attainment at KS1 indicated they should be achieving a higher level in KS2 –opened 10 minutes early for parents and children to go through a series of maths exercises –held weekly marking sessions for pupils to go through the weeks maths questions

11 Using pupil voice Some of the schools focused on using pupil voice. For example, one group of primary schools: –asked pupils at the beginning of a topic which aspects they would like to study and included these in a concept map –gave pupils the opportunity to talk about their learning and life in the school at the start of lessons –used learning logs to give pupils more freedom and responsibility for their learning –provided opportunities for pupils to visit each other’s schools to share activities and learning

12 Involving parents Some of the schools focused on increasing parent’s involvement in their child’s education. For example, one junior school: –identified a group of Somali boys who were at risk of complete disengagement –used a weekly meeting between the students and a learning mentor to develop social skills and behaviour –set up a fathers’ club at a local community centre to involve the parents in their son’s education –planned a fathers and sons football club to improve the relationships between them

13 Who were the pupils and teachers in the study? In total there were 120 projects The projects involved –105 pupils –92 headteachers –92 teachers –40 teaching assistants The projects included early years, primary and secondary settings

14 How was the information gathered? Each project submitted a report detailing the nature of their work and the impact on pupils The data from all the reports was recorded on a database The data from 28 sample reports was looked at in detail The data from all of the reports was synthesised and analysed to identify trends Case study visits were carried out to illustrate and exemplify the findings

15 How can teachers use the evidence in this study? Some of the schools raised the level of parental involvement as a strategy for closing the progress gap. You might like to talk with a colleague about a group of pupils that you think are at risk of falling behind. What are the barriers to the parents becoming involved in their child’s education? What strategies might you use to overcome these barriers?

16 How can school leaders use the evidence in this study? Schools which made progress in closing the progress gap identified ways of collecting data about the impact on pupils. This included information about improved attainment, attitudes and skills You might like to consider a group of disadvantaged pupils in your school. What sort of improvements would you like them to make and how would you collect evidence of this?

17 Follow-up reading Cordingley, P., Temperley, J. & Buckler, N. (2010) Leadership for Closing the Gap: final report. Nottingham: National College. Accessible at: the-gap-full-report.pdf the-gap-full-report.pdf


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