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1 Teacher Research on Effective Instruction for ELLs “I didn’t feel like I was much of a [change] agent, or didn’t have the capacity to be one…[after action.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Teacher Research on Effective Instruction for ELLs “I didn’t feel like I was much of a [change] agent, or didn’t have the capacity to be one…[after action."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Teacher Research on Effective Instruction for ELLs “I didn’t feel like I was much of a [change] agent, or didn’t have the capacity to be one…[after action research] all of a sudden, I feel really empowered that I can make these great changes.” --Melissa Poirier, Middle School Teacher WIDA Conference October 24, 2014

2 Learning Objectives Participants will:  consider how teachers can act as agents of positive change  examine the inquiry process around improving instruction for ELLs  connect to your practice 2

3 About CCE’s Vision for Schools  Equity and data are embedded in all conversations and practices,  Teaching and learning are purposeful, challenging, and have value beyond school,  Assessment demonstrates the competence of students in multiple ways, and  Collaborative practices improve teaching and learning. 3

4 Our Guiding Questions  How can teachers be agents of change?  What does the research say?  Why and how can teachers be researchers?  What can we learn from them? 4

5 Guiding Question:  How can teachers be agents of change? 5

6 Introducing Ourselves  Read “Improved Student Learning Through Teacher Inquiry”  Choose a sentence and share with a partner  Also consider how you are a change agent for students  Share

7 Guiding Question:  What does the research say? 7

8 “Despite the best efforts of America's educators to bring greater equity to our schools, too many children- especially low-income and minority children- are still denied the educational opportunities they need to succeed.” Russlynn Ali Assistant, Secretory for Civil Rights U.S. Department of Education As cited in National Opportunity to Learn Campaign,

9 The National Context 9 As cited in The National Center for Education Statistics, https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cgf.asphttps://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cgf.asp

10 What the Research Says 10

11 The Reality for ELLs High level of drop outs High level of suspensions High level of being retained Issues with Special Education services A “culture of failure” Uriarte, Tung, Karp, et al. (2011)

12 What We Can Do 12  Coherent, standards-based curriculum  Explicit teaching of all aspects of English  Opportunities to use English authentically  Multiple forms of assessment  Encourage collaboration and teacher leadership as effective PD  Exemplify cultural competence  Build climate of safety and belonging for ELL students and families Tung, Uriarte, Diez, et al. (2011)

13 Guiding Question:  Why and how can teachers be researchers? 13

14 In an ideal state… …are empowered, effective teachers. To create empowered teachers, we must:  identify their individual needs,  personalize a PD plan,  access multiple PD module, and  use continuous feedback for continual refresh of offerings based on performance. Gates PD Redesign Readiness Assessment

15 Inquiry Define the Problem Determine the cause(s ) Identify Solutions Action Plan Evaluate and Reassess

16 Guiding Question:  What can we learn from them? – How can we utilize the inquiry process in our practice? – How might we deepen our work to target specific instructional needs for ELLs? 16

17 Articles about our work 17

18 18 “In contexts of cultural, linguistic, or economic diversity, where social inequity inevitably exists, these interactions are never neutral; they either challenge the operation of coercive relations of power in the wider society or they reinforce those power relations.” --Jim Cummins

19 References and Resources For more about ELL research:  Tung, R. et al. (2011, Nov.). Learning from Consistently High Performing and Improving Schools for English language Learners in Boston Public Schools. Boston, MA: Center for Collaboration and The Mauricio Gastón Institute for Latino Community Development and Public Policy.  Uriarte, M. et al. (2011, Nov.). Improving Educational Outcomes of English Language Learners in Schools and Programs in Boston Public Schools. Boston, MA: Center for Collaboration and The Mauricio Gastón Institute for Latino Community Development and Public Policy.  Both studies available at: 19

20 References and Resources For more about different types of language backgrounds of ELLs:  Freeman, D. & Freeman, Y. (2004). Three Types of English Language Learners. National Council of Teachers of English, 9(4), 1-3. Retrieved from  Menken, K & Kleyn, T. (2009). The Difficult Road for Long- Term English Learners. Educational Leadership, 66(7), 1-5. Retrieved from Term_English_Learners.aspx. For more about the ELL population:  Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy. (2013, Fall). Closing the Gap for English Language Learners. Cambridge, MA: Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy. Retrieved from  The Progress of Education Reform. (2013). English Language Learners: A growing-yet-underserved- student population. Education Commission of the States. 14(6), 1-6. Retrieved from  The National Center for Education Statistics. (2013). Percentage of Public Schools Students who are English Language Learners by State. Retrieved from https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cgf.asp. 20

21 References and Resources 21 For more about instructing ELLs:  Long, S., Bell, D., & Brown, J. (2004). Learning from Children as Skillful Teachers of Their Peers. National Council of Teachers of English, 9(4), 5. Retrieved from  Macdonald, E. & Brisk, M E. (2004). Planning for Writing: Defining Purpose, Audience, and Topic With English Language Learners. National Council of Teachers of English, 9(4) 3-4. Retrieved from  Zwiers, J & Crawford, M. (2009). How to Start Academic Conversations: An innovative technique draws young English Language Learners in academic discussions. Educational Leadership, Retrieved from ademic%20Conversations.pdf. ademic%20Conversations.pdf  Cummins, J. (1999). BICS and CALP: Clarifying the Distinction. Toronto: University of Toronto. Retrieved from  

22 Contact Information Center for Collaborative Education Phone: (617)

23 Thank You! 23


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