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Presentation on theme: "Students click here Teacher’s click here Table of Contents Overview Introduction Task Process Evaluation Credits and References Multiple Text Web."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Students click here Teacher’s click here

3 Table of Contents Overview Introduction Task Process Evaluation Credits and References Multiple Text Web

4 Overview This social studies webquest challenges 5 th graders to explore what it means to be an American through inquiry-based instruction spanning several subject areas. The powerpoint should be shown by the teacher as a class, and not individually. Teacher will stop powerpoint to do lesson plans imbedded in the presentation until final goal is reached. The Georgia Performance Standards addressed in this project include: -SS5CG4 The student will explain the meaning of “e pluribus unum” and the reason it was the motto of the United States. SS5CG1 The student will explain how a citizen’s rights are protected under the U.S. Constitution. a. Explain the responsibilities of a citizen. b. Explain the freedoms granted by the Bill of Rights.

5 b. Describe the cultural developments and individual contributions in the 1920s of the Jazz Age (Louis Armstrong), baseball (Babe Ruth), the automobile (Henry Ford), and the airplane (Charles Lindbergh). S5L3. Students will diagram and label parts of various cells (plant, animal, single-celled, multi-celled). a. Use magnifiers such as microscopes or hand lenses to observe cells and their structure. b. Identify parts of a plant cell (membrane, wall, cytoplasm, nucleus, chloroplasts) and of an animal cell (membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus) and determine the function of the parts. SS5H4 M4N1. Students will further develop their understanding of how whole numbers are represented in the base-ten numeration system. a.Identify place value names and places from hundredths through one million.

6 M4N5. Students will further develop their understanding of the meaning of decimal fractions and use them in computations. a. Understand decimal fractions are a part of the base-ten system. b. Understand the relative size of numbers and order two digit decimal fractions. DATA ANALYSIS M5D1. Students will analyze graphs. a. Analyze data presented in a graph. b. Compare and contrast multiple graphic representations (circle graphs, line graphs, bar graphs, etc.) for a single set of data and discuss the advantages/disadvantages of each.

7 ELA5R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. For informational texts, the student reads and comprehends in order to develop understanding and expertise and produces evidence of reading that: a.Locates facts that answer the reader’s questions. b.c. Identifies and uses knowledge of common graphic features (e.g., charts, maps, diagrams, captions, and illustrations). ELA5W3 The student uses research and technology to support writing. The student a. Acknowledges information from sources. b. Uses organizational features of printed text (i.e., citations, end notes, bibliographic references, appendices) to locate relevant information. d. Uses the features of texts (e.g., index, table of contents, guide words, alphabetical/ numerical order) to obtain and organize information and thoughts. f. Creates simple documents by using electronic media and employing organizational features

8 Introduction The Scenario: An alien girl from a far off galaxy has been informed that her planet will be destroyed by a meteor in two weeks. She must find a new home, and has chosen the planet earth. She learns that earthlings live in countries, and needs to choose one to reside. She is asking citizens of each country to tell her why she should choose theirs. Our fifth graders must solidify their own thinking on what it means to be an American to persuade their alien friend what an opportunity our country provides. -The question “What does it mean to be an American?”is open-ended, and can be answered in different ways. My hope is that students will discover for themselves the answer to this question by understanding the foundation of our country, and the people that exemplify her spirit.

9 Task Students will learn about our country’s beginnings, and the original motto “e pluribus unum”, and how we are strengthened by the diversity of our nation. Students will work to find the characteristics that bind them together, and discover values held dear by Americans. They will then collectively formulate a persuasive powerpoint presentation to convince their alien friend that America is her best choice.

10 Process -Students will learn standards as they proceed through this powerpoint. - Students will work in groups to research one of 4 roles. (game-changers, dream-seekers, freedom-finders, and culture-setters) -Each roles contain several famous Americans. Students will have to decide the characteristics and values that these Americans have in common to help formulate their own ideas about being an American. -Students will then come together as a class to share their findings. They will collectively come up with 3 main reasons why their alien friend should choose America as her new home in a powerpoint presentation. Also,each student will create at least one slide that expresses what being an American means to them from what they have learned about themselves and their country.

11 Evaluation Students will be evaluated on their group participation, graphic organizers, and oral presentation. Students will also be graded on their individual powerpoint slide, and collective powerpoint presentation. Click the icon for assessment rubric:

12 References: Multiple Text Web 1. Bierman, Carol Journey to Ellis Island How my came to America. New York: Madison Press. 2. Book/Syonoptic 3.This is a true story that chronicles one Russian family ’ s experience to and out of Ellis Island. It supplements the theme of America being a country of immigrants, and “ e pluribus unum ”, by providing a real life connection to expand prior knowledge. 1. Factmonster. Retrieved October 18, 2008, from 2 Website/Complementary 3.This is the main website from which students learn about specific Americans featured in the webquest. 1.Wikipedia. Retrieed October 15, 2008, from 2.Website:: Painting/controlling 3.This is a painting by George Seurat that illustrates pointillism, and ties into the theme “ out of many, one ”. 1.Copland, Aaron. Appalachian Spring. Leonard Berstein and the New York Philharmonic CD. New York: CD: Music/complementary 3.Appalachian Spring has a uniquely American sound, and exemplifies an aspect of American culture. 1.United Streaming (2001). Our Government. (don ’ t know creator) 2.Video clip/Complementary 3.This short video clip gives a short history of our founding government, and the motto “ e pluribus unum. ” 1.Feinberg, B.S The Dictionary of the U.S. Constituion. New York: Grolier Publishing. 2.Book/Controlling 3.This reference book is an excellent resource that provides in easy-to-understand language every- thing needed to understand our Constitution. 1.Photo: Immigrant Family On Ellis Island.. Retrieved from http.//www.allposteres.com on October 15, Photo/Synoptic 3.Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. This photo visually expresses the hopes and dreams of immigrants who came through Ellis Island. 1.Feinberg, B.S The Dictionary of the U.S. Constituion. New York: Grolier Publishing. 2.Book/Controlling *3.This reference book is an excellent resource that provides in easy-to-understand language every- thing needed to understand our Constitution.

13 Credits and References analogies/analogy-cell.html analogies/analogy-cell.html dresden.de/i1/kaw/diverses%20Material/www.illusionworks.com/html/co lor_aftereffect.html dresden.de/i1/kaw/diverses%20Material/www.illusionworks.com/html/co lor_aftereffect.html 840F-41D0-B043-B178C97649CC&blnFromSearch=1 840F-41D0-B043-B178C97649CC&blnFromSearch=1 Vans-McLaughlin, V. and Lightman, M. (1997). Ellis Island and the Peopling of America. New York: New Press. Fall 2008 TOSS Click Here to return to main page

14 Have you ever asked yourself what it means to be an American? Consider what values and ideals Americans hold most dear.

15 There’s no time to waste! Listen to this urgent request: Click on the star to hear an urgent message!

16 How about our essential question? Click on the spinning object.

17 E Pluribus Unum Discovering Our Country’s Beginnings A Thematic Unit Social Studies Art Many dots, One Picture Math Many parts make a whole Lang. Arts. Reliving the Immigrant Experience Science Cells: Out of Many, One

18 When do we use a pie chart? Pie charts are useful when you want to show a fraction or percentage of a whole. Out of many slices, we have one pie: “e pluribus unum”, remember? Let’s take a look again at the pie chart of immigrants.

19 Immigrants from Europe in 1870 This chart tells us that the WHOLE is 2.7 million people. How many millions of people came from Russia? The pie chart tells us the percentage of people, but not how many. We will have to figure out what 1.3% of 2.7 million is.

20 Immigrants from Europe in 1870 How do we calculate a percentage of a number? Let’s think of an easy example. What is 50% (or half ) of 100? We know it’s 50. How did we get the answer? Let’s first take the percentage sign off by making it a decimal. 50% is the same as.50. So,we got the answer by MULTIPLYING.50 and 100.

21 Immigrants from Europe in 1870 Now back to our original problem: How many millions of people came from Russia? Let’s change 1.3% to a decimal so we can multiply. 1.3% is equal to.013. Now let’s take the decimal point out of 2.7 million: 2,700,000. SO, 2,700,000 times.013 equals 35, 100 people. Did anyone solve it a different way? Now let’s ask ourselves, does the answer make sense? Well, one percent of 2.7 million would be 27,000. So 35,100 sounds about right!

22 Real life and percentages. Remember, we always need to think of the WHOLE when working with percentages. A small whole can give a very different impression, and not always be accurate in the larger scheme of things! Click on Fido !

23 In the classroom… Let’s create pie charts! Let’s use the number of students as the whole, and analyze information about ourselves. Click the stop sign to return to main page

24 Coming to America This is an interactive bulletin board activity where you will experience what it was like to immigrate to America through Ellis Island. Be prepared to read, write, and have fun! Back to E Pluribus Unum

25 DOT Art What can you make with dots, you ask? Click the BIG dot to find out!

26 This is a work of art by a French artist, Georges Seurat, who developed an art form called pontillism. Look very closely at the picture. What do you see? Many dots! But, if you stand back, you see a man’s portrait. Now take a picture from the colored Sunday funnies provided for you. Look at the picture with a strong magnifiying glass. What do you see?

27 What’s happening? Looking close up, all you may see are a bunch of dots. But from far away, you see an array of color. This occurs because your eyes sees primary colors and your brain mixes them, so you see a fuller range of color. Try an example of the kind of “tricks” your eyes and mind can play with color.

28 This is cool! Read these instructions carefully. Keep your hand on the computer mouse. In the next slide, find the little speaker sign in the middle of your screen. Click on it and enjoy a music clip of Aaron Copland’s “Appalachian Spring”. While you listen, KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE SPEAKER ICON until the end of the music. Do not let your eyes rove anywhere else. When the music stops, click anywhere on the slide to advance to the next one. KEEP LOOKING at the icon while you do this. Do not look around. Are you ready? Let’s get started!

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31 What did you see? The science of color and visual perception is complicated, but what you saw was an afterimage of the complementary color. RedCyan BlueYellow GreenMagenta

32 Make art with dots! Let’s see what kind of art we can make together. Take an index card and cover it with dots of just red, green or blue. Let’s put them all together on the wall, and see what it looks like from a distance! Back to E Pluribus Unum

33 Cells: Out of Many ONE -Cells are the building blocks of all living things. -Trillions of cells make up your one body! -Do you think a single cell is alive? Does it: 1)Use energy to work? 2)reproduce? 3)Take in nutrients? 4)grow? 5)Get rid of waste? 6)React to outside change? Nerve cell

34 Plant or Animal Cell? How can you tell which is which?

35 Animal and Plant Cells have a: Cell membrane -gives cell its shape,and controls what goes in and out of the cell.

36 Cytoplasm -the jellylike substance that houses the organelles.

37 Nucleus -is the cell’s control center, and contains all the information to run the cells.

38 Vacuoles -oval shaped structures that store food, water, and waste.

39 Mitochondria -takes food and turns it into energy so cell can function.

40 Golgi Complex (or golgi apparatus, body) -This cell part ships and distributes the cell’s chemical products.

41 Plant Cells have a: Cell Wall -a sturdy layer around the cell membrane which protect and support the cell.

42 Chloroplast -which contains chlorophyll (the green stuff that captures the energy from the sun to make food for the plant)

43 Main difference between animal and plant cells - the key is in the chloroplast! Plants make their own food, while animals have to eat something for a source of energy.

44 Develop an analogy for the cell Now that you know the basic parts of a cell, work in small groups of 4-5 students to come up with an ANALOGY for the cell. What is a cell like? Some say it’s like a factory, or a school. What do YOU think, and WHY? DRAW a cell (plant or animal) and label your analogy. Then, let’s look at plant and animal cells in a microscope. Click here to return to main to page

45 E Pluribus Unum was a motto adopted by the United States government in 1782, and still appears on the Great Seal of the United States, though in 1956, “In God We Trust” became our nation’s official motto. (The eagle is holding it in his beak.) Can you think of where you have seen this symbol? Click Here to find out!

46 Here are some examples. Can you think of any more? By the way, have you looked closely at the dollar bill? It’s full of symbolism and mystery! Click on the bill if you want to read more.

47 “E Pluribus Unum” Translating E PLURIBUS UNUM The general meaning of each Latin word is clear: Pluribus is related to the English word: "plural." Unum is related to the English word: "unit." E Pluribus Unum describes an action: Many uniting into one. An accurate translation of the motto is "Out of many, one" – a phrase that elegantly captures the symbolism on the shield. What does it mean?!?!?

48 Our founding fathers originally chose this motto to signify the union between the 13 original states and the federal government. Today, “Out of many, one” signifies the strength of our diverse nation. Click Here to watch a short video clip

49 One of the strength of our democracy lies in the fact that we elect our president, and the people who make our laws and represent us.

50 The people elect the branches in green. Department of Justice Department of Labor Department of State Department of Transportation Department of Treasury Executive Branch The President and his Cabinet Department of Agriculture Department of Housing & Urban Development Legislative Branch Congress: The Senate and House of Representatives Judicial Branch The U.S.Supreme Court Department of Commerce Department of Defense Department of Energy Department of Health & Human Services Department of Education Department of Veterans Affairs Department of the Interior Our Federal Government

51 Remember that not all governments are democratic. Many immigrants came to America to escape political and religious persecution. Other reasons immigrants came: -to escape starvation and hardship -to avoid war or revolution -for jobs and opportunity -in search of a better life and future

52 Immigrants from Europe in )In 1870, from which country did the most number of immigrants come from? 2) How many immigrants came from that country? 3) From which country did 415,800 immigrants come from? Click here for a hint!

53 Hints: How about converting 2.7 million into a number without the word million. How about writing 15.4% so there’s no percentage mark. What would you have to do? Most of all, look at your answer and see if it makes sense! Click here to return to problem.

54 Immigrants from Europe between What reasons abroad and in America might cause immigration to peak in 1900?

55 Ellis Island (in New York) was not the only immigration processing center into America, but from 1892 to its closing in 1954, over 12 million people passed through its doors.

56 Immigrants arriving at Ellis Island were greeted by the Statue of Liberty, a symbol of freedom and opportunity throughout the world. “…Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free...”

57 Most of the immigrants who came through Ellis Island were from Europe.

58 Ellis Island Opens 1892 Peak year: 1,004,756 people processed 1907 National Origins Law reduces flow of immigration 1924 Ellis Island Immigration Center Closes 1954 Ellis Island Immigration Museum opens 1990

59 Can you imagine taking the long journey to America, only to be turned away? You had to : Pass a physical and mental exam Pass a government inspection Answer questions Have some money OR you could be detained (kept on the island) or worse, deported! (sent back)

60 Can YOU pass the citizenship test? Try a sampling of the questions new immigrants today are asked, by clicking on Lady Liberty. Click Here to skip test.skip

61 1) Who wrote the Declaration of Independence? a)George WashingtonGeorge Washington b) Thomas JeffersonThomas Jefferson c) James MadisonJames Madison d) John HancockJohn Hancock

62 Click here to next question.

63 Click here to return to question

64 2) What are the first words of the Constitution? a)When, in the course of human events…When, in the course of human events… b)In order to form a more perfect Union..In order to form a more perfect Union.. c)To whom it may concern,To whom it may concern, d)We the people…We the people…

65 Click here to next question.

66 Click here to return to question

67 3)Which one of these is a right NOT guaranteed by the First Amendment? a)Freedom of the pressFreedom of the press b)Right to trial by juryRight to trial by jury c) Right to bear arms Right to bear arms d)Right to happinessRight to happiness

68 Click here to next question.

69 Click here to return to question

70 4) What do you call the first ten amendments to the Constitution? a)The Bill of RightsThe Bill of Rights b)The PreambleThe Preamble c)The Statue of LibertyThe Statue of Liberty d)The Declaration of IndependenceThe Declaration of Independence

71 Click here to next question.

72 Click here to return to question

73 5) Which of these was NOT one of the original 13 states? a)New HampshireNew Hampshire b)New YorkNew York c)DelawareDelaware d)MaineMaine

74 Click here to next question.

75 Click here to return to question

76 6) What territory did the United States buy from France in 1803? a)LouisianaLouisiana b)AlaskaAlaska c)MaineMaine d)VermontVermont

77 Click here to next question

78 Click here to return to question

79 7)Under our Constitution some powers belong to the Federal Government. Which is NOT a federal power? a)To declare warTo declare war b)To print moneyTo print money c)To declare treatiesTo declare treaties d)To provide educationTo provide education

80 Click here to next question.

81 Click here to return to question

82 8) If both the President and the Vice President can no longer serve, who becomes President? a)Secretary of StateSecretary of State b)Secretary of DefenseSecretary of Defense c)The Speaker of the HouseThe Speaker of the House d)President Pro Tempore of the SenatePresident Pro Tempore of the Senate

83 Click here to next question.

84 Click here to return to question

85 9)How many justices are there on the U.S. Supreme Court? a)44 b) 55 c)77 d)99

86 Click here to next question.

87 Click here to return to question

88 10) Who selects the Supreme Court justices? a)The Electoral CollegeThe Electoral College b)The peopleThe people c) The President appoints themThe President appoints them d)The SenateThe Senate

89 Congratulations! You’ve passed the citizenship test. Go to next slideCongratulations! You’ve passed the citizenship test. Go to next slide.

90 Click here to return to question

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92 Click the Great Seal to view a media clip on citizenship and our responsibilities. Click here for next slide AFTER the movie

93 The Lincoln Memorial Located on the National Mall in Washington D.C. was built in the honor of Abraham Lincoln, our 16 th president. Click the picture to try again

94 The U.S. Capitol Building in Washington D.C. is where the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the federal government makes laws. Click the picture to try again

95 The Washington Monument is a tall obelisk on the National Mall in Washington D.C. This Presidential Memorial commemorates our first President George Washington. This stone structure is the world’s tallest standing obelisk. Click the picture to try again

96 Mount Rushmore is located in South Dakota. This 60-foot granite sculpture depicts four former presidents of the United States. They are (from left to right): George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. Click the picture to try again

97 The Great Seal?!?!?!? Not THAT kind of seal, silly! The Great Seal of the United States!!!!! I’m flattered, but click on me to try again.

98 Now, let’s begin your task! Before we can help our alien friend, we need to solidify our own thoughts on what it means to be an American. Your team will be assigned to research a group of Americans. Your task is to learn about each of them and discover what values, ideals and characteristics bind them together. Share your findings, and collectively come up with 3 reasons why our alien friend should choose to live in America!

99 What you will do: Game -changersDream-seekers Freedom-findersCulture-setters 1) Divide yourselves into 4 groups. Each group will choose one of the following roles on the right. 2) Go through the powerpoint and follow directions. 3) Research each American by clicking on their picture. Use a graphic organizer to process the information. 4) Summarize your findings and present them to the rest of your classmates by answering the questions posed on your main slide. 5)Then, come together as a class and decide on the three most persuasive reasons why your alien friend should choose to make her home in America. 6) Make a powerpoint presentation to send to your alien friend. Give her your 3 main reasons. Also, each student will make one slide to express what being an American means to them.

100 Dream-seekers Albert Einstein Madeleine AlbrightIgor StravinskyJohnMuir Immigrants often came to America in search of a better life…to fulfill a dream that may not have been possible in their home country. Below are four examples of people who chose, or who’s parents chose to leave their country and become U.S. citizens. Ask yourself: What do they have in common? What did they contribute to America? Why couldn’t they have done what they did in their own country? Use a graphic organizer to help you process the information.

101 Albert Einstein Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Albert Einstein? -What country did he emigrate from? -What were his accomplishments? -What was he seeking when he came to America? Click on Albert to return to Dream- seekers. When you are finished, click here.

102 Madeleine Albright Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Madeleine Albright? -What country did she emigrate from? -What were her accomplishments? -What was her family seeking when they came to America? Click on Madeleine to return to Dream-seekers. When you are finished, click here.

103 Igor Stravinsky Click on the links above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Igor Stravinsky? -What country did he emigrate from? -What were his accomplishments? -What was he seeking when he chose to become a U.S. citizen? Additional Info Click on Igor to return to Dream-seekers. When you are finished, click here. You are listening to Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring”.

104 John Muir Click on the links above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was John Muir? -What country did his family emigrate from? -What were his accomplishments? -What was his family seeking when they chose to come to America? Additional Info Click on John to return to Dream- seekers. When you are finished, click here.

105 Game-changers Lewis & Clark Henry Ford Charles LindbergBill Gates There are certain people in American history, who have invented or done something that fundamentally changed the course of our lives and the way we live. Below are four examples. As you learn of their accomplishments, ask yourself: How have they done this? What are their similarities and differences? What would life be like, if they had not been here to do what they did? Use a graphic organizer to help you process the information.

106 Lewis and Clark Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who were Lewis and Clark? -What were their accomplishments? -How did their accomplishments fundamentally change life in America? -Why might Lewis and Clark be characterized as “game- changers”? When you are finished, click here. Click Lewis & Clark to Return to Game-changers.

107 Henry Ford Click on the link above begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Henry Ford? -What were his accomplishments? -How did his accomplishments fundamentally change life in America? -Why might he be characterized as a “game-changer”? When you are finished, click here. Click on Henry to return to Game-changers.

108 Charles Lindbergh Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who were the Wright Brothers? -What were their accomplishments? -How did their accomplishments fundamentally change life in America? -Why might he be considered a “game-changer?” When you are finished, click here. Click on Charles to return to Game-changers.

109 Bill Gates Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who were the Wright Brothers? -What were their accomplishments? -How did their accomplishments fundamentally change life in America? -Why might he be considered a “game-changer?” When you are finished, click here. Click on Bill to return to Game-changers.

110 Freedom-finders Caesar ChavezThurgood Marshall Susan B. AnthonyRussell Means Tn the Preamble to the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson wrote: “We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed with certain unalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.” The following are a sample of individuals who have fought to fulfill this promise for all Americans. Ask yourself: What do these four people have in common? Who and what did they fight for? What barriers did they break? Use a graphic organizer to help you process the information.

111 Caesar Chavez Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Caesar Chavez? -What were his accomplishments and who did it help? -What freedom or rights did he fight for? When you are finished, click here. Click on Caesar to return to Freedom-finders.

112 Thurgood Marshall Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: Be sure to click on his biography and the Migrant Worker link. -Who was Thurgood Marshall? -What were his accomplishments and who did it help? -What freedom or rights did he fight for? When you are finished, click here. Click on Thurgood to return to Freedom-finders.

113 Susan B. Anthony Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Susan B. Anthony? -What were her accomplishments and who did it help? -What freedom or rights did she fight for? When you are finished, click here. Click on Susan to return to Freedom-finders.

114 Russell Means Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Russell Means? -What were his accomplishments and who did it help? -What freedom or rights did he fight for? When you are finished, click here. Click on Russell to return to Freedom-finders.

115 Culture-setters Babe RuthNorman Rockwell Louis Armstrong Walt Disney There are certain things that are uniquely American, that embody the American spirit or have become a part of the American culture. The following individuals are examples of Americans who through sports, art, music, and entertainment exemplify these qualities. Ask yourself: What did they accomplish? How did they contribute to American culture? Use a graphic organizer to help you process the information.

116 Babe Ruth Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Babe Ruth? -What were his accomplishments? -What part of American culture is he associated with? Click on Babe to return to Culture-setters. When you are finished, click here.

117 Norman Rockwell Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Norman Rockwell? -What were his accomplishments? -What part of American culture is he associated with? Click on Norman to return to Culture-setters. When you are finished, click here. Click and ENJOY!

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122 Louis Armstrong Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Norman Rockwell? -What were his accomplishments? -What part of American culture is he associated with? Click on Louis to return to Culture-setters. When you are finished, click here.

123 Walt Disney Click on the link above to begin your research. Answer the following questions: -Who was Walt Disney? -What were his accomplishments? -What part of American culture is he associated with? Click Walt to return to Culture-setters. When you are finished, click here.

124 What to do next: You have researched your Americans. Now decide what common thread binds them together. Present your findings to the class by answering the questions posed, and defining the common thread. Make sure each group member has a chance to speak. Rehearse it! Come back when you have finished.

125 Create a Powerpoint Now, as a class, decide on THREE main reasons your alien friend should make America her home. Make a powerpoint presentation to make your case. (Use this powerpoint as an example on all that you can do!) -Each of you will make an individual slide where you can express what being an American means to you. -Out of MANY slides, we will have ONE great presentation! Come back when your powerpoint is complete.

126 Now, send an astronaut to deliver your powerpoint to our alien friend. Will she choose America as her new home?

127 You’ve convinced me to choose America as my new home. Thank you fellow earthlings!

128 Great job, patriots! Reflect on your journey. What part did you like best? What did you like least? What would you like to learn more about? What contributed most to your learning?


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